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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

FR. J. DONALD MONAM. SJ 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2011 with funding from 
Boston College Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/subturriundertow1986bost 



BOSTON COLLEGE ^ 

3HESTNUT HILL, MASSACHUSETO_021^67 
\/OLUME 74 



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College. 
College College. 

Boston College. 



2 Opening 




opening 3 



It gave us the chance to know- 
The chance to understand 

our selves 

and our world. 



4 Opening 



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The Universe 

and 

The Qtonn. 

It offered us a sense 

of History 

and a sense of 

the inner mind. 



6 Opening 




Operdng 7 



We wondered quietly, 
late at night- 

What does it mean to know? 
What does it mean to love? 
To be? 
To die? 



8 Opening 




opening 9 



Some of us found answers 

but nnost of us nnerely drew owoy 

with a greater understanding 

of the oonnplexities. 

An expensive, worthwhile, 

wonderful exercise 

in futility, 



10 opening 




opening 1 1 



Now we emerge- 

Born into a world 

of mortgages and credentials. 

Born into a world 

whioh needs our talent 

our love 

our hope. 

We emerge from that 

refuge we ooll 



12 Opening 




opening 13 



College. 

College College College. 

Boston College. 



14 Opening 




opening 15 



1 8 BOSTON 
36 ACTIVITIES 
76 SPORTS 
152 PERSPECTIVES 
184 STUDENT LIFE 
246 ACADEMICS 
274 FRIENDS 



14 



16 Table of Contents 




Table of Contents 17 





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22 Boston 




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26 Boston 




Boston 27 




28 Boston 




Boston 29 




30 Boston 




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32 Boston 




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34 Boston 




Boston 35 






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ALPHA 
SIGMA 

Jesuit Society 



Alpha Sigma Nu, the Greek abbrevla- 
tlon for Adelphotes Skolastikon 
Nlkephoron (Brotherhood of Honor 
Students), was the National Jesuit 
Honor Society. Members consisted of 
juniors and seniors from, the five under- 
graduate schools and four graduate 
schools of the university. Qualification 
for membership was determined by 
scholarship, loyalty and service both in 
and outside the Boston College commu- 
nity. Scholarship was the most im- 
portant qualification for membership in 
Alpha Sigma Nu because of the in- 
tellectual purpose of higher education. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Cathy Gorrigan (Secretary), Diane Helow (Executive Committee), 
Susan Monaco (Vice President), Donna Consolini, Leslie Thompson (President), 
Robert J. Cheney, S.J. (Advisor), Dma Consolini, Richard Sica (Treasurer). 



ALPHA 

EPSILOU 

DELTA 



Society for Med Students 

Alpha EpsUon Delta was a national honor society for 
students preparing for careers In medicine, dentistry 
and the allied medical fields. This Society was 
established to promote 5 goals: to encourage excellence 
in premedical scholarship, to stimulate an appreciation 
of the importance of premedical education in medical 
studies, to provide a forum where medical and premedi- 
cal students and educators can contact one another 
regarding premedical education programs, to bind 
together students with similar interests, and to benefit 
health organizations, charities and the community with 
its knowledge. 

Members were invited to apply for election into the 
society on the basis of academic performance and parti- 
cipation in activities. Other requirements Included 
completion of three sem.e8ters of college work. 



ALPHA 
KAPPA 
DELTA 



Sociology Honor Society 

Alpha Kappa Delta was a National Sociology Honor 
Society which sponsored departmental speakers and 
other activities. Any student with ten credits m Sociology, 
a B average and a total GPA of 3.00 or better could qualily 
as a member. The society's advisor was Professor 
Michael Malec. 



38 Honor Societies 



BETA 

GAMMA 

SIGMA 



Honor Society in Business 



The Boston College chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma was 
Beta of Massachusetts. This was the only scholarship 
honor society in the field of commerce and business, 
recognized by the American Association of Collegiate 
Schools of Business. 

Membership in this society was considered the 
highest scholastic honor for a student In commerce and 
business. The advisor for this society was Professor 
Arthur Glynn. 



DOBRO 
SLOVO 



Slavic Honor Society 



Dobro Slovo was the Boston College Chapter of the Na- 
tional Slavic Honor Society. Founded in 1963 with the 
support of the American Association of Teachers of 
Slavic and East European Languages, this society was 
designed to encourage scholarly pursuits in Slavic 
studies. Membership qualifications included an interest 
in Slavic studies, three years of Slavic studies maintain- 
mg at least a B + average, and an overall GPA of 3.00. 
Professor L.G Jones was the advisor of Dobro Slovo. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: James E. Bilodeau, Jr. (Treasurer,), Joseph P. Tragen (President), Prof. 
Leon SmoUnskl (Moderator), Allison Dougherty (Vice President), Lisa Nazaretian (Secretary). 1st 
ROW: Lori Kelly, Cindy Knudsen, Denise Gross, Kerry Sullivan, Betsy Kale, Eileen Gibbons, Susan 
Morth. 2nd ROW: Pam Lindgren, Sherrle Stuekey, Alice Mills, Mark David Seman, Wally Mullin, Kara 
Unger, Robert Lum. 



OMICROIT 

DELTA 

EPSILON 

Economics Society 



Omlcron Delta Epsilon was the Inter- 
national Honor Society for Economics 
maj ors. The society was founded in 1 9 1 5 
to fulfill four main objectives: to 
recognize academic achievement m the 
study of economies, to support the study 
of economics through a grant known as 
the Fischer/Tuassig Award, to publish 
articles on topics In economics in the 
Society's journal, "The American Econo- 
mist," and to spread knowledge of econo- 
mics through public lectures, debates, 
and events. 

To qualify for membership, one must 
have been an Economics major for at 
least two years, have a GPA in Econo- 
mics of at least 3.3 and a 3.0 overall. 



Honor Societies 39 



PHI 
ALPHA 
THETA 



History Honor Society 



Phi Alpha Theta, founded In 1921, was a History Inter- 
national Honor Society. It was the largest accredited 
honor society in the association of college honor 
societies. The goal of this professional society was to 
bring together students, teachers and writers of History 
in an Intellectual atmosphere to encourage and assist 
one another in historical research and publication. 
Members were elected on the basis of excellence in the 
study of history. The society's advisor was Prof Judy 
Smith. 



PHI 

BETA 

KAPPA 



Academic Excellence 



Phi Beta Kappa was a national honor society consist- 
ing of members who demonstrated academic ex- 
ceUence. The charter for this society was received by B.C. 
in 1971. Membership was extended to AS'S under- 
graduates by invitation only. Some exceptional students 
were invited to Join in their Junior year, while the 
rem.ainder were selected before graduation. The three 
main criteria for m.embership Included excellence 
demonstrated in the student's field of study, breadth of 
course selection outside the major, and a high overall 
GPA. The Phi Beta Kappa advisor was Professor Richard 
Tresch. 



ORDER 

OF THE 

GROSS 

AND 

CROWN 

A ^ S Honor Society 



Founded in 1937, the Order of the 
Cross and Crown was the Arts and 
Sciences Honor Society for senior men 
and women who, while achieving an 
average of at least a 3.5, had records of 
service and leadership on campus. The 
selection committee, made up of the 
Dean and members of the faculty and 
administration of Arts and Sciences, 
appointed distinguished members to be 
Chief Marshal and Marshals. 




LEFtVj IIIGHT: BOTTOM; Mury Maiigmvuu i l«la.i»lia.ll), f'tilrlula li.iine,;y, Lla-i Cavmj.'iugli, Cliri.sUiia J4lppBll, Angela 151] ida, Ijuiiria J. 
BrezlJieklf Chief Mai-Bhall), 1^. WUllam NeenarifAdvlsnr), Aitdj-tia Hoairi«lIl.Susaiil'tij'clanu:o( Marshall). Martha [llltnii.I.tVTiri ChrlKLman 
(Marshall), KeraunOriazzu.lstllOW: ColJeKtiShea,KartBlack,H<)benJ.McOulr()(Maishall), Mark L)avldKKmari(Mai'shaU),<Jullf! Alvarez 
(Marshall), lAurie A. MaolJougall. Kuu:la M. Goddard, FalrlcuiM. HUl, Cinherlne K. Papso, IS. Chrlewpher Cagglano II, Maureen A Maol'ar. 
laiie, Barbara Itowling. 2nd ROW: Richard J. Hyan, Eric J. Dieffenbaoh, John C. LePore, UsaR Oaspard, EUzabeih P. 'IValnor, Irene R Good, 
Martha M. Madaue, Joseph M. Harney, Brian J. McKlnnon, Roben B, Mcljiflerty, Chuck Buller. 



40 



Honor Societies 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Maiy Margraviti, Kerstln Gnazzo, Bernadette Thie (President), 
Maria Young, Denise Gunn (Treasurer), Leah Dinnlgan. 



PI 

MU 
EPSILON 

Math. Honor Society 



M. i'i Mu EpsUon Fraternity was a 
uoii jt;(jret organization whose purpose 
was the promotion of scholarly activity 
in Mathematics among students. It 
accomplished this by electing members 
according to their proficiency In mathe- 
matics, and engaging in activities 
designed to promote the mathematical 
and scholarly development of its 
members. 

Incorporated in 1914 as the Pi Mu 
EpsUon Fraternity, over 200 chapters of 
this honorary mathematics fraternity 
were located at colleges and universities 
across the United States. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Kathleen Juliano, Semira SemJno, Elizabeth GusaneUl, 
GaroUne Long, Mona Carpenter. 1st ROW: Cynthia Kerr Lisa Pletrangeli, GaU 
Aklllian, Nancy Irwin, Paula Griffin, Lorene Vleira, AnnMarle Stephanos. 



SIGMA 
THETA 
TAU 

Nursing Society 



Sigma Theta Tau was founded m 192S 
for nurses. The name, Sigma Theta Tau, 
was derived fromi the initials of the 
Greek words meaning love, courage and 
honor. This national honor society of 
nursing was organized to encourage 
and recognize superior scholarship and 
leadership achievement in under- 
graduate and graduate nijrsing. Alpha 
Chi chapter at Boston College was 
organized in 1970 to recognize under- 
graduate and graduate nursing 
students who reflect the qualities of ex- 
cellence m scholarship and leadership 
in the profession. 



Honor Societies 41 




The School of Management Senate 
represented the SOM student body. It 
planned academic, social and career- 
related events for students and 
represented the student body on many 
comLmittees, Including the UGBC Senate 
and the SOM Educational Policy 
Committee. The Senate continued to 
push for a heavier emphasis on busi- 
ness ethics within the school's curri- 
culum.. 

The Senate sponsored such successful 
events as September's Faculty-Student 
Rcnic, an SOM Golf Tournament, an 
MBA Forum, several Meet the Dean 
socials and informal student-faculty 
dinners in Murray House. 



LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Julie Tierney (Secretary '89), Rich Litchfield (Vice 
President '89), Mark Austin (President '89), Nancy Trust (Treasurer '89). 1st ROW: 
Pete Clifford (President '86), Michael Noone (Treasurer '86), Jim Higgins 
(Treasurer '87), Dave Donatelle (President '87), Christina Abella (Vice President 
'88), Julie Chutoransky (Secretary '88). 



The Boston College School of Nursing 
Senate was a constituent of the 
Massachusetts State Senate Nurse's 
Association and the National Student 
Nurse's Association.The purpose of the 
Senate was to assume responsibility for 
contributing to nursing education in 
order to provide for the highest quality 
health care, and to provide programs 
representative of fundamental and 
current professional interests and con- 
cerns. A main goal of this organization 
was to aid in the development of the 
person, his/her professional role, and 
his/her responsibility for the health care 
of people in aU walks of life. 




LEFT TO RIGHT; BOTTOM: Kelly f'\irlong, Christine Kulsick, JentiUer Dacey, EUen 
Provogt, Nancy Borgatti, Krlsta Durant, Karen Nugent. 1st ROW: Leslie Peltz, 
Kristle Kobelski, Kimberly KeUey, Mona Carpenter, Lynmarie Fiittger, Margaret 
Walsh, Lisa Zimmerman, EUen McSweeney, Annie Pecevlch, Fran Oullette (Faculty 
Advisor), Amy Bouchard. 



42 Government 



A^S COALinON 
OF CAUCUSES 



A<5?S Government 



The Arts and Sciences Coalition of Gaususes was 
established in January, 1985, to unite all areas of 
academic concern for the College of Arts and Sciences. 
The A ©" S Coalition consisted of a number of committees 
headed by students elected in the second semester. This 
representative body aimed to increase communication 
within the Boston College Community and to provide 
leadership for all A (5f S students. 



SOE 
SENATE 



SOE Government 



The School of Education Senate was the body that offl- 
( ilally represented SOE undergraduate students by keep- 
ing the lines of communication open between students, 
faculty and the administration. The Senate was Involved 
in the Educational Policy Committee, the Field 
Placement Concerns Committee, curriculum develop- 
ment, publishing the Campion Chronicle, sponsoring 
open forums. Annual Interclass Skits, and promotion 
and tenure procedures. 

The Senate was comprised of six elected senators from 
each class who elected four officers. Elections were held 
in the spring for the next year and In the fall for 
freshmen. 




UGBC 



Government of BC 



Each year, UGBC through its many 
committees and hundreds of student 
memibers, offered academic and social 
programming to enhance student life 
and to contribute to student input m 
university affairs. It served as a liaison 
between the students and the adminis- 
tration, as well as to the rest of the 
Boston College community. 



LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Lisa Cerabino, Michael Johnson, Karen O'Toole, Janet 
Woodka, Caset Roberts, Chris ReiHy, Maureen O'SuUivan. 1st ROW: Barry Pike, 
Peter Roberts, Stephen Cadigan, Patrick Dunne, William Jones, Michael Geffroy, 
Heidi Nemec, Krlsta Durant. 



Government 43 



ASIAH 

STUDEITT 

CLUB 

Asian Culture 



The main purpose of the Asian 
Students Club (ASC) was to bring 
cultural awareness to students within 
the B.C. community. ASC was composed 
of a diverse and unique group of people. 
Such nationalities as Chinese, Filipino, 
Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese 
were represented. Others interested in 
Asian culture were also members. This 
blend of various Asian cultures was 
sought to ensure a smooth mtegratlon of 
the B.C. comimunity. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Bill Yul (Secretary), Chrltina Long (Freshman 
Secretary), Evelyn Horn (Freshman Secretary), Melissa Chin (Treasurer). 1st ROW: 
Kenny Tiangco (President), Shirley Lai (Vice President). 



AEMEKIAJSr 

CLUB 

Armenian Culture 



The Armenian Club of Boston College was a non- 
partisan student organization that encouraged interest 
in Armenian culture. Language, literature and the arts, 
as well as Armenian society, education, and recreation 
were concerns of its members. Activities included a 
panel discussion at Boston College dealing with the 
assimilation of the Armenian people in America, an 
inter-colleglate dance which drew more than 500 
students from the Boston area, and yearly donations ot' 
Armenian literature to the Boston College libraries. 
Membership was open to part and full time under- 
graduates, graduates and students in the evening 
school. 



FIETE 
ARTS 
UKTIGN 



Recognition of Fine Arts 



The Fine Arts Union attracted students of all majors, 
especially studio art and art history majors. It was con- 
cerned with creating a recognition of the fine arts by 
Boston CoUege and the surrounding commumty. The 
Union organized student art shows, a lecture series, art 
sales, and trips to art galleries and museums in Boston 
and New York. 



44 Language/Cultural 



BLACK 

STUDEITT 

FORUM 

Afro-American Culture 



The Black Student Forum was formei I 
In September, 1970 as an outgrowth ol' 
the Black Talent Program. It was an 
organization committed to current 
African issues and the African popula- 
tion here at Boston College. The Forum 
provided a social, cultural and political 
medium directed at the black student 
population. 

The Black Student Forum's goal for 
1985-86 was two-fold. It attempted to be 
more visible on the Boston College 
campus, as well as program diverse 
events in order to attract a wider 
audience. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Ethel Garvin (Recording Secretary), J.R. Clark (Vice President) 
Tlffanye Warren (President), Derek Brown (Treasurer), Michelle Smith (Clerical 
Secretary). 




The Chess Club was open to players of 
all abilities: beginner to advanced. 
Opportunities existed for both Informal 
games and serious tournaments. Club 
tournaments and a B.C. open- competi- 
tion were offered. Instruction at aU levels 
was also available. 

The Chess Club wanted to attract, 
novice players who had an appetite foi' 
the game. It wished for amateurs, as weU 
as experts to feast in the intellectually 
stimulating game. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Javier Gonzalez-Gancedo, James Doak Berry III, Henry Blackweu, 
Micheal Boucher, John Fanning, Andrea Kowalski, Pablo Llado, Brian Cronin, Ed 
Feldman, Mark O'ConneU, Mike Grant. 



Languagel Cultural 45 



HELLENIC 
SOCIETY 

Greek Culture 



As a result of growing Interest of many 
enthusiastic members, the Hellenic 
Society was able to expand Its annual 
agenda. Members were exposed to a 
broad spectrum of Greek lifestyle and 
tradition through celebrations, social 
and educational programs and religious 
commemorations. Other events were 
ethnic holidays, such as OXI Day and 
Greek Independence Day, comm.unlty 
service projects and parties with 
Hellenic organizations from their 
universities. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Nicholas Lambros (Corresponding Secretary), Christie Nicolaides (Recording 
Secretary), Christos Stamos (Treasurer), John Vardis (President), Maria Kakava (Advisor), Nikolas 
Travlos (Professor). 1st ROW: Irene Bremis, LisaKaralambos, Georgia Tsouoalas, Sandra Vegelatos, Jane 
Rouvapes, Ragnel Forens, Maria Grammas, Dia Philippide (Professor), Demitrius lairides (Professor), 
Myrna Lmardos, Ghristme Himaras. 2nd BOW: Michael St. Germain, Sonya Harami, Stephanie CaUas, 
Barbie Koukouivaris, Sophia Petradelis, Andrew Panaijuetor. 



IRISH 
SOCIETY 

Irish Culture 



The Irish Society of B.C. was founded 
in the Sprmg of 1981 to preserve and 
promote the Irish culture at the 
university. The Society attempted to do 
so through social and cultural events, 
the most significant of which were the 
siamsas (house parties), in which 
members gathered together to initiate 
new voting members into the organiza- 
tion. The Society sponsored the Irish 
Radio Show on WZBC ("Wee Bit of 
Blarney") and published an Irish 
newsletter. Professor Kevin O'Neill, of 
the Irish Studies Program, recently be- 
came the advisor and, as a result, the 
Society has begun to co-host events with 
the Irish Studies Program. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Patrice Kelly (President), Caroline Long (Ti^easurer), Tracy Reagai i 
(Secretary), Maureen O'Conner (Vice President). 



46 Language/Cultural 



OISA 



International Culture 



The Organization for International 
Students Affairs of Boston College 
(OISA) was established in collaboration 
with the International affairs committee 
of the Undergraduate Government of 
Boston College (UGBC) and the Interna- 
tional Student Association. It aimed to 
promote interaction between American 
and international students at Boston 
College. Membership was open to all 
enrolled students. 

Over 300 students representing sixty- 
four countries attended Boston College. 
OISA worked to Increase awareness of 
the special needs of these students. It 
encouraged development of interna- 
tional student leadership and student 
involvement within the B.C. community. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Fran BaHester, Marm Occhl, Marlene Strutz, Christina 
Hernandez. 1st ROW: Pablo Llado, Manuel Matuchana, Felix Gonzalez-Rubio, 
Fernando Garcia-Chacon, Beatrlz Sllva. 



LE CERCLE 
FRANCAIS 

French Culture 



Le Cercle Francals was interested m promotmg the 
study of French culture and the aspects of French life. 
They accomplished this by holding various lectures, and 
sponsoring cultural activities, fUms and trips. 



GERMAU 
ACADEMY 

German Culture 



The German Academy at Boston College was an 
organization whose purpose was to foster interest m the 
German language and culture through lectures, filmis, 
social activities and other events. 



Language/Cultural 47 



OLA 



Hispanic Culture 



The Organization of Latins in 
America (OLA) was Boston College's 
club for the Hispanic community. This 
active organization attempted to m.ake 
B.C. aware of the richness, beauty and 
diversity of the many cultures which 
comprise the Hispanic heritage. 

During the course of the year, OLA 
sponsored dances, films and lectures 
aimed at imparting a knowledge and 
appreciation of Latin-American coun- 
tries. Many different countries and 
cultures were represented in OLA. 
Students from various South American, 
Central American, and Hispanic coun- 
tries who resided in the United States 
often debated conflicting beliefs of their 
cultures, making the club especially in- 
teresting. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Lorna Colon (Secretary), Marc Pugllese (Treasurer), Carlos Areralo 
(President), Luis Roldan (Vice President), Mayra Arana (Graduate Represenatlve), 
Georglna Arrieta, Jose Andrade. 



SLAVIC 

AND 

EASTERN 

CIRCLE 

Special Student Majors 



The Slavic and Eastern Circle promoted awareness of 
Slavic culture and it served and advised students study- 
ing Slavic Studies or Asian Studies, Linguistics or 
Russian. The members learned about Slavic and 
Eastern cultures through movies and plays as well as 
literature. 



CINEMA 
SOCIETY 



Screening Special Films 

The Cinema Society was a student-run organization 
for those interested in special film programs. The Society 
screened films that were not frequently seen, including 
classical, foreign, avant-garde and contemporary films. 
It was founded in 1983 with the goal of presentmg 
quaUty films. 



48 Language/Cultural 



GREYCLIFF 

Cultural Language Dorm 



Greycliff Language House was Boston College's only 
cultural language dorm. Offering in-residence French 
and Spanish programs, it incorporated academics and 
residential living in one unique and exciting inter- 
cultural experience. Housing both the "Maison 
Francaise" and "La Casa Hispanica," Greycliff hosted 
many events throughout the year, allowing B.C. students 
and the residents themselves to become more aware of 
the French and Hispanic cultures. 

In 1986, Greycliff students organized a Counsul's 
Night, an International Christmas Party, several trips to 
cultural events in the metropolitan Boston area and 
many other enriching and fun events. 



MURRAY 
HOUSE 

Commuter House 



Murray House, located at S92 
Hammond Street, was the Commuter 
Center. It was a large Tudor house that 
offered study space, lounges, a television 
room, a typing room., a game room and 
full kitchen facilities. It was a place 
where comiinuters could meet and so- 
cialize outside the classroom. It featured 
lectures, films and Thursday night 
spaghetti dinners. 



HALEY 
HOUSE 



Center for Social Action 



Haley House served as an action/r' .: ■ ,• : 
promoting social Justice concerns at B.C. ii v.'; i.j i - / ;au.;!i .it 
314 Hammond Street and its staff members provided 
lectures, films, workshops and a newsletter on a variety 
of contemporary social issues. The house served as a 
resource center on social justice as well as a forum to 
share opinions of affiliated groups. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Nancy Savage, Kevin Yourell, Colleen Shea. 



Programming 49 



O'COKNELL 
HOUSE 

Student Union 



O'Connell House was In the middle of 
upper-campus. Formerly the Llgget 
Estate, the suppossedJy haunted man- 
sion was a gift to B.C. from Cardinal 
O'Connell In 1937. It served the B.C. 
comm.unity as the Student Union since 
the -fall of 1972. 

O'Connell House was used as a Jesuit 
residence for awhile, and then housed 
the Fine Arts Department. In 1986 it was 
used for many different student- 
oriented activities such as Sunday night 
m.ovies and Middle-March Ball. Five 
staff members ran the house and aU 
had different responsibilities. 

The house was open during the week 
for studying, piano playing and parties, 
dances, and films on weekends. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Cathy Cesario, Jacqul Brogan. 1st ROW: Alan Feeney, 
Kathy Hagerty. 2nd ROW: David Macaione. 



THE 

RAT 

STAFF 



Thursday MgMs 

Sounding like an exterminating 
company in disguise, the Rat Staff at 
Boston College was the group that made 
the famed "Thursday Night at the Rat" 
possible. These people regulated admiis- 
sion, provided music and also served 
thafgoiden nectar". 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Peter Caride. 1st ROW: James Langway, Kathy Reilly, 
Mike MacKeen, Allison Doughterty, Dave Smith, Andy Zelter, Joe Ramirez. 2nd 
ROW: Linda Nelson (Defensive Coach), Matt Mulcahy, Carlos Cala, Kelly Morrell, 
Ray Hemstreet, Robert Gonzalez, Bill Bishop, Tony Heggie, John E. Lee. 3rd ROW: 
Eileen Kelleher, Carole Kane, Deirdre McKenna, Anne Donahue, Amanda Hunt, 
Tricia Casey, Doug KeUy (Manager), Cheryl Wade, SaUie Vece, Maria Sheridan, 
Oabrielle Garofalo. 



50 Frofrramming 



PROGRAMMING 

COMMITTEES 

OF UGBC 

University Programming 



The Programming Committee, directed by the Vice 
President for Programming, scheduled and 
programmed all social and cultural events on campus 
such as prominent lectures, popular concerts. Orienta- 
tion and Homecoming. 



COALZnON FOR 
PERFORMING 
AND VISUAL 
ARTS 

Increase Cultural Awareness 



The Coalition for the Performing and Visual Arts was 
composed of representatives from the Dramatics 
Society, the University Chorale, the Dance Ensemble, 
O'Connell House, and other performing and art related 
groups. The Coalition was formed to Improve the 
commiunleatlon between such groups and to increase 
the cultural awareness on the B.C. campus. The coalition 
pubUshed a monthly calendar of all the campus cultural 
events. 



CHILDREN'S 
THEATER 
COMPAUY 



Creative Drama 



The Children's Theater Company 
offered a supplementary form of crea- 
tive drama within the University. The 
small, improvisatlonal group worked 
closely together, using its own Ideas to 
develop an origmal traveling show that 
entertained children within the greater 
Boston Area. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Kate Soriano, Carolyn Dever (Secretaiy), Mary Lemay 
(Treasurer). 1st ROW: Llane McKltchen (Vice President), Jeannlne LaPlace, Nancy 
Novo. 



Programming/ Performing 5 1 



SPIRIT 



BC Clieerleaders 



For many years the Boston College 
Cheerleadlng Squad faithfully 
cheered on varsity teams in victory 
and defeat. The squad consisted of 14 
members, 2 alternates and the Eagle 
mascot. The purpose of the squad was 
to promote and represent B.C. both on 
the playing field and off. In addition to 
cheering at the games, the squad 
attended various comm.unity events 
such as parades and other promo- 
tional activities. It was the goal of the 
squad to uphold the B.C. tradition of 
spirit and enthusiasm. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Jennifer Johnson, Tanji P. Reed, Julie Lynch, Tricia 
ScarteUi. 1st ROW: Joe Lenihan, Charlie Cresci, Tony Pelino, Decio, 





The BC Cheerleaders at the Holy 
Cross Football game (left); Captain, 
Martha Robrnson (above). 



52 I'erjormmg 




DANCE 
ENSEMBLE 

Performing Arts 



Founded In 1980, The Dance 
Ensemble of Boston College focused on 
exposing the B.C. community to dance 
as both a form of entertainment and a 
fine art. It also aimed to Improve the 
choreographic and performance skills 
of its individual members. The Dance 
Ensemble performed at a variety of 
Cabaret and Cultural Nights during the 
year and staged two major productions 
— one m the faU and one in the spring. 



LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Suzle Schmidt, Maureen MacFarlane (Director). 1st 
ROW: Kara Loft, Krlsten Burke, Carolyn Kelley, Vicky Wong. 2nd ROW: Rose Marie 
Joly, John Parisi, Suzanne O'Grady, Maryrose Lane (Stage Manager). 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: E.Christopher Cagglano III, Amy YarboFough, Maiyellen Enrlquez, Leslie 
Anderson, Richard Carey, Paul Dalgnault, Keriy Dowling, Lisa Cavanaugh, Layi.ain Chosty, Sean 
Kohane. 1st Row: Donna Brezinski, Linton Young, Glen Smith, Peter Regis, Michael Weingart, Monica 
Somesti, Paula Blute, Catherine Doody, Lisa Passacantando, Maureen MacFarlane. 2nd ROW: Daniel 
Parley, Patricia Roche, Melissa Whit?, Brian Richardson, Bobby Higgms, James Conway, James Burke, 
Houghton Brown. 



DRAMA 
SOCIETY 

Tlieatre Art 



The function of the Boston CoUege 
Dramatics Society was primarily an 
educative one. This society was 
dedicated to making its members aware 
of the nature and potential of drama 
and training them in various aspects of 
theatre (i.e. acting, directing and 
designing). 

The typical Dram.atics society season 
consisted of four malnstage produc- 
tions, several laboratory productions 
(i.e.-student-directed), and a series of 
workshops and special lectures dealing 
with a wide variety of theater art topics. 
In order to fulfill all of the society's 
responsibilities, the club not only called 
upon actors and actresses but also 
technical personnel to run lights, apply 
makeup and design costumes. 



Performing 53 




54 Performing 









BC 

MAECHmG 

BAITD 

Music 



The BG "Screamln' Eagles" 
Marching Band was one of the 
largest extracurricular groups on 
campus. The Band consisted of 
over 200 members including 
managers, twirlers and the color- 
guard. The director of the band 
was Peter C. Siragusa and the 
band's faculty advisor was Fr. 
Joseph A. Glavin. 

Aside from halftlme perfor- 
mances, the band also performed 
in various community functions. 
These included the Allston/ 
Brighton Celebration Day Parade 
and a perform.ance at a New 
England Patriots game. 



Performing 55 



UNIVERSITY 
CHORALE 



The Chorus 



The University Chorale of Boston 
College, under the direction of Dr. G. 
Alexander Peloquin, had a fabulous 
year. The 160 members were under- 
graduates, graduate students, faculty 
memibers and Jesuits. 

The Messiah Highlights, Archdiocese 
of Boston's Music Workshop and the 
Christmas Concert were the con- 
centrations of the first semester. The 
second semester was comprised of the 
Palm Sunday Liturgy, Providence 
Cathedral and Spring Concert. 

Chorale social activities included the 
infamous Chorale Parties, Talent Show 
and Banquet. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Anthony L. Falotlco, Amy M. Yarbrough, Susan L. 
Barbrow, Maryellen Enrlquez. 1st ROW: Glen P. Smith, John Werner. 2nd ROW: 
Sean Carney, Jacqueline Gradlsar. 



JAZZ 
EETSEMBLE 

Playing Jazz 



The Boston CoUege Jazz Band was a twenty-two piece 
ensemble which included saxophones, trombones, 
trumpets, a rhythm section and vocalists. The band was 
comprised of students from all different classes and 
majors. The one thing that all members had in common 
was their desire to play Jazz. 

The purpose of this organization was to give the 
student an outlet to enhance his or her musical 
knowledge and ability. The Jazz Band provided the 
entire B.C. student body and faculty an opportunity to 
hear and enjoy Jazz. Different styles of music ranging 
from big band swing to Jazz rock to pop, were performed. 

The band's schedule consisted of weekly meetings to 
prepare for both on- and off-campus functions. It 
performed for events held in O'ConneU House, the Rat, 
the Theatre and on the Dustbowl. Members hoped that 
their audience would obtain the same enjoyment from 
their performance that they received from performing. 



MUSICAL 
GTHLD 

Cultiiral Awareness 



The Musical Guild of Boston CoUege, founded in 1983, 
was an association of students, faculty, and staff 
committed to the cultivation of cultural awareness on 
campus through live performances of music. AU full or 
part time students, faculty and staff were eligible for 
GuUd membership. 

This Guild strove toward an active cultural dimension 
within Boston College by maintaining that the 
university was much miore than an intellectual institu- 
tion. Rather, B.C. was an assemblage of dedicated in- 
dividuals who strove "ever to excel" in many cultural and 
social areas. In addition, the GuUd also worked to 
enhance B.C. by promoting educational exchanges 
among those interested in music. Some of the successful 
events sponsored by this group included two mini 
outdoor concerts, two community recitals, a trip to the 
musical, "The King and I" and a recital by pianist Carla 
Hubner. 



56 Performing 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Donna Hubbard, Maya Handwerk, Michelle High (Freshman Representa- 
tive), Deneen Haywood, Katriee Rivers, Marjorie Beauvoir (Corresponding Secretary), Vickie McDanlel, 
Shawn Norton, Andrea Barnett (Recording Secretary). 1st ROW: Dora Sotelo, Una O'Mara, Michelle 
Smith, Pierre Monette (President), Aaron Ward (Freshman Representative), Terry Wlttner, Linda Jones, 
Annette Lewis (Treasurer), Charmame Mattls. 2nd BOW: Eugene Karbutz, Domenlc Bozzotto, Nma 
Rivera (Vice-President). 



VOICES 

OF 

IMANI 

Gospel Choir 



'i'iie VoiOfes ol' Iniaiii was Lhe (j'jspel 
choir of Bostx)n College whose purpose 
was to serve the college community and 
the Greater Boston area. Imani is a 
Swahlli word which means "faith." It 
was faith accompanied by dedication 
that kept the choir together. 

The choir was organized eight years 
ago, under the leadership of Larry W. 
DeLong '82, by a group of Black students 
who came together as a means of 
preserving their culture and identity. 



REPUBLICAN 
CLUB 

Politicians 



The College Republicans were formed to fuUill the 
primaiy objective of promoting the principles of the 
Republican Party among the students of Boston College. 
Members were involved In aiding Republican candidates 
In their bids for election. In addition, this organization 
helped to develop leadership skills and provide 
awareness of political issues among B.C.'s Repubilcan 
student body. 



THE 
OBSERVER 

Publications 



The Observer was established in 198S as an m- 
dependent campus newspaper. It provided an alterna- 
tive viewpoint on current topics pertinent to Boston 
College. The Observer provided miformatlve and mter- 
estmg coverage of movies, entertamment, sports and 
literature. At times, articles and editorials concerning 
campus, national and world events were satirical. WhUe 
the Observer was prmcipaUy a conservative publication, 
It did not have any affiliation with any particular political 
party. 



PerformingI Political I Publications 57 




The Heights, Inc. was Boston College's 
weekly Independent student newspaper. 
It provided all Interested students a 
medium through which to gain practi- 
cal experience in all aspects of Journa- 
lism: news, sports, feature writing, 
photography, copy, layout, editing, 
advertising and business managing. 
The weekly publication gave students 
up-to-date coverage of local and campus 
events along with an overview of an the 
important national and mternational 
news. Sports, entertainment reviews, 
special events and editorials were addi- 
tional sections. 



p 






, .: fum^ 


- ^ 








_.,>v--- 






f^ 






I- 


E":^^. 


:X 


■»»- 


^ 


k< 



LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: CoUeen MUlerlck, Maureen Sylvia, Christina Hlppell, 
James Van Anglen, P. J. Brady. 1st ROW: Jean McMillan, Kenny Carty, Karen 
O'Toole, Tony Zarfflo, Veronica Noonan. 2nd ROW: Terence Connors, Dan DaSUva, 
John Merrier, Joanne McAllister, Robert GuUleman, Sean Borstel, Steve Pitzpatrick. 



Stylus was established in 1882 as a 
literary magazine. The goal of this publi- 
cation was to cultivate literary ex- 
ceUenee by stimulating Interest in writ- 
ing for publication. Any student from 
the university was invited to submit 
short stories, poetry, essays, artwork and 
photography for the three yearly issues 
of Stylus. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Jay Venti (Editor), Diane Steinhamp, George Norman, Joan 
Rigdon (Editor), Thya Conway. 



58 Publications 




SUB 
TURRI 



LEFT TO RIGHT; BOTTOM: Bill Russell, Keith Gnazzo (Managing Editor), Anthony 
Cammarota (Business Manager), Geoff Why. 1st ROW: RJ McMahon, Carolyn 
Morrissey, Judy Vogtle, Mlmi Rehak, Cynthia Cady. 2nci ROW: Chris Botelho, 
Georglna Arrleta, Laurie Prazler, Amy Seigenthaler, Joanne Palumbo. 3rd ROW: 
Kerstin Gnazzo (Editor-in-Chief), Berta Blaz, Joanne Conte. 



The Yearbook of BC 



'.'■n\: 'I'urri, the yearUooi; of Llocton 
( > lir :^(;, was processing its 74th edition 
in the the 1985-86 academic year. Sub 
Turrl ("Under the tower"), was designed 
to give visual and Uteraiy memories to 
the student of Boston College, especially 
the graduating senior. 

The staff consisted of dedicated in- 
dividuals who often worked late into the 
night to make necessary deadlines. 

The yearbook itself contained sections 
on Boston, Sports, Student Life, Activi- 
ties, Academics and Seniors and did its 
best to give the student a taste of life on 
the Boston College campus. 



WZBC 



Tlie Radio Station of BC 



WZBC was Boston College's student-run radio station. 
Membership was open to all undergraduates and gradu- 
ates. 

WZBC-FM was located at 90.3 MHz with a broadcasting 
radius of about fifty mUes. This station offered extensive 
local and national news, public affairs programming 
and sports coverage. Regarding music, WZBC-FM 
provided an alternative music source including rock, 
folk, jazz and free-form progressive music. 

WZBC operated sixteen departments encompassing 
everything from on the air announcing to business, 
public relations and sales. 



CHARISMATIC 
PRAYER 
GROUP 

Relaxed Prayer Renewal 



The Charismatic Prayer Community was composed of 
B.C. students who believed that group prayer within a 
community added an exciting dimension to religious ex- 
perience. The group met eveiy Tuesday at 7:30 PM in St. 
Joseph's Chapel. It also sponsored a mini-course each 
semester called "The Life in the Spirit Seminar." This 
course introduced students to Charismatic Prayer 
Renewal in a relaxed atmosphere. 



Publications/Religious 59 



CAMPUS 

CRUSADE 

FOR 

CHRIST 

Grow in Faith 



Campus Crusade for Christ was an In- 
terdenomlnatlonal Christian 
movement that began in 1951 and 
spread to over 300 colleges and 
universities worldwide. Here at B.C., 
Campus Crusade was run by students 
and guided by five full-time Campus 
Crusade for Christ staff. This group 
provided large group meetings, Bible 
studies, socials, retreats and special 
summer projects for those who sought a 
personal relationship with Jesus Christ. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Lynda Schmltz (Vice President), Ruth Yang (President), 
Bill Talbot (Secretary). 1st ROW: Marty McComber, GaU Bough, Bobbie LeViness, 
Camille Toronski. 2nd ROW: Elaine Scanlon, Michael Formichelli, Tracey Lambert. 
3rd ROW: Debbie Talbot, Michael T. McGuire, Carolyn Kelley. 4th ROW: Mike Ryan, 
Rhonda Picard, Pete LeViness, Karl Lee. 



THE LITURGY 

ARTS 
GROUP 

Student Ministry of BC 



The Liturgy Arts Group was an organization that was 
formed to replace the Student Ministry of Boston CoUege. 
The group was a student-run organization that worked 
closely with the University chaplaincy to encourage 
personal growth and faith development through partici- 
pation in the weekly student liturgies. 

This organization had several folk music groups that 
performed at on-campus masses. Instruments played 
included guitars, percussion, a banjo, flute and a 
trumpet. Students in the Eucharistic Group were trained 
as lay ministers who helped distribute the eucharist at 
weekly masses. Students in the Lecture Group were 
trained in the reading of the Scripture. 



CREW 
CLUB 



Athletic Conditioning 

The Crew Club was organized in 1983. Competitions 
were held on the Charles River against such universities 
as Yale, Tufts, Harvard and Boston University. The club 
focused on morale, athletic conditioning and fund rais- 
ing. Newcomers were welcome to Join and learn to row as 
long as they had a spirit of sportsmanship. Future plans 
for the club included fielding the eight-man shell at the 
Head of the Charles as weU as entering other regattas 
throughout the year. Success for the team resulted from 
extremely dedicated morning and afternoon practices. 



60 Religiovsl Sports Clubs 



WOMEN'S 
ICE HOCKEY 

Women on Ice 



Women's Ice Hockey exisLed us a club sport at boston 
CoUege for over ten years. The team was a member of thi- 
Women's Collegiate Ice Hockey Association, a loosely- 
structured, thirty-four team league. In this league, the 
team competed against both varsity and club teams 
representing universities throughout New England. All 
equipment, except for ice skates, was given to the 
players. Highlights of the season included a Women's 
Beanpot Tournament and post-season playoffs. 



SPARRING 
CLUB 

Martial Artists of BC 



The Sparring Club w-i,;: 'i, /"roup in ■winch members 
who practiced various si;/le;; < 4 martial arts, such as Tae 
Kwen Do, Karate and Kung Pu, could get together for 
some light sparring. All sessions had at least one 
moderator. Any belts from white to black were welcome. 
It was a great way to see different styles in action as well 
as to meet fellow martial artists. Although no formal 
teaching was done, individual help was available upon 
request. 




LEJ^'l '\\j RIGHT: BOTTOM; Judy Barnet, Joseph McNabb, Rich Spinelli, Wayne Piers, Kevlii Downey, 
Patrick Hannigan, Gatiiy Martwlck, Tliomafi Hone, Rick Jones, Meg Smitli, Geoffrey Shapiro. 1st ROW: 
Denlse Walte, Elizabeth Dunn, Barbara Fountain, Shonii Williams, Liz Wall, Sharon McGarty, Chris 
Carilli, Kara Renner, John Tichenor, Dan Koerwer. 2nd ROW: Jim Dentzer, Mike Ross, Greg Yoch, Jim 
Krebs, Michael Giaquinto, Joe Bouvler, Hugh Montague, Todd Moran, John Bostany, Tim Sullivan, Dan 
McKlernan, Jimmy Tenn, John Harrington, Mike Rossacci, Mark Shaughnessy, Marianne Allaire, Dan 
Rosshlrt, Ileana Almeida, Wendy Hotai. 



EAEATE 
CLUB 

Martial Arts 



Karate Club membership was offered 
to both men and women. Tixe art and 
philosophy of karate-do offered 
members with no miartial arts ex- 
perience the opportunity to learn self- 
defense as well as an alternative method 
of exercise. For experienced miembers, 
the club was a vehicle in which new 
styles could be learned and already 
acquired martial arts skills could be 
further developed. 

In addition to membership for 
personal development, club members 
also competed against other colleges in 
New England Collegiate Karate Con- 
federation tournaments. 



Sports Clubs 61 



MEET'S 
RUGBY 

Men's Ruggers 



The Men's Rugby Club finished the 
1985 regular season with a 5-S record. 
In the post season, the men advanced to 
the seml-flnals in the 16 team New 
England Collegiate Tournament. It lost 
to Dartmouth, who eventually won the 
collegiate crown. 

Even though Men's Rugby was a club, 
they formed together like a Division 1 in- 
tercollegiate team. They played well 
under coach Ken Daley, who had 
coached the team smce 1967. 




LEFI' TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Sooll Kerslake, Bob McGulre, John Slyachjtema, Ist ROW: Paul CappaUaim, Sal Russo, VUiny Rella, John 
Edwards, Charlie Deschapelles, Matt Mudd, Ken Daly f Coach). 2nd ROW: Don ftobens, Bill O'Kane, Mike Mcljaughlin, Tom O'Connor, Tony 
DiNota. Dan Sullivan, Mike Rooney. 3rd ROW: Bob Boroff, Mike Dunbar, Mike Devlin, Ed Fernandez, Joe SLanganeill, Craig Morse, Tim 
Bradl, Adam Lowe. 4th ROW: Jim Breen, Pat Kelly, Jim Milton, Tetl Hughes, Mike Pfau, Ted Fischer, Ryan Brackley, Rob Stark, Ted Dolan. 
5th ROW: Brian Lang, Mark Austin, Tom Turley, Brtan Gasmghlno, Jack Dowling, L^an Scott, Doug Crowley, John Crowie.v, John Kenney, 
Jerry Condon, Tim Burke, Chris 2ebicoff, Herre Ijiwrence. 



WOMEET'S 
RUGBY 

Women's Ruggers 



Under the guidance of coach Ken 
Daley of Ireland, the Women's Rugby 
Team finished their season with a 
record of 6-1. This was a tremendous 
accomplishment for such a young team 
which faced competition from other 
New England schools including Brown, 
Radcliffe and Boston University. 

This student-run club was guided 
through their season with the help of 
this motto: "In a sport of elegant 
violence, the only retribution that you 
get is from yourself." 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: liUuri Herlihy (Captain j, Kan blacic coresident). Colleen 
Murphy (Captain,). 1st ROW: Mario Brehlo, Julie Doherty, Maureen Kelly, 
Catherine Nowak, Maria Dunn, Lynne Bercaw. Snd ROW: Christina Kelley, Lynne 
Hancock, Stephanie Kenney, Heather Guerriero, Liz Whalley, Anne Del Vecchlo, 
Mary Ethyl Mermin. 3rd ROW: Jen Truiillo, Jen Baldwin, Mo Jqyce. 



i 



62 Sports Clubs 




SQUASH 
CLUB 

Fierce Competition 



Allyi- 



■|.l UiOnhiiti <j\' iJllJJi';Iil 



LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Paul S. Manning, Robert Alonso, Loretta Lure. 1st ROW: 
Eric Perez, Ed Feldman, John Fanning, HoUy Hillenbrand, Fablo Grandt. 



organlziii;;, Up; oquash Club of Bostx^n 
College achieved its status In March of 
1984. Led by senior Dan O'Brien, the 
club had an Initial membership of 30. 

The club resumed the following fall 
under the leadership of Dave Spitzler 
and Ed Feldm.an. Changes were made, 
and the club began meeting on a weekly 
basis. In the end, the club filtered down 
to a handful of enthusiasts. 

In order to manage the lasting 22 
mem.bers, the club changed its constitu- 
tion by employing a round robin tourna- 
ment to precede the final ladder. 



MEU'S WATER 
POLO CLUB 

Rigorous Competition 



Water Polo was a high Intensity sport of rigorous 
competition. Dedication, discipline, comraderle, pride 
and spirit were only a few of the qualities necessary to 
create a good team. Water Polo was demanding, but 
guaranteed a season fuE of good sport and good times. 

The Water Polo team was a member of the NCAA Divi- 
sion 11, New England Conference, but also competed 
along with the Division I schools. Through the years, the 
team earned the respect and recognition of its 
opponents and was consistently ranked amiong the top 
1 in New England. Although a tough sport to play, water 
polo was exciting as weU as entertaining. 



MASSPIRG 



Public Interest Group 



Masspirg was the largest consumer and environmen- 
tal advocacy group in New England. It achieved a record 
of accomplishments that won the attention and respect 
of decision-makers and citizens across Massachusetts. 
Among Masspirg's achievements were the passage of 
the Bottle Bill, a deposit law designed to reduce litter and 
encourage conservation, promotion of proper handling 
and storage of hazardous wastes. Other successes in- 
cluded the operation of consumer hotlines at Boston 
College and five other locations set up to help Boston 
area citizens exercise their legal rights. Students in- 
volved in Masspirg could learn skUls in research, lobby- 
ing, public education, and organization. More im- 
portantly, students were given the opportunity to see 
how they could make a difference as citizens. 



Sports Clubs/Service 63 



STUDEUT 

ADMISSIONS 

PROGRAM 

Recruitment/Exposure 



The Student Admissions Program started in the early 
70's when Admissions Director, John Magulre, asked 
five students to help with interviewing. In 1986, with over 
800 participants, the Student Admissions Program was 
one of the largest student volunteer organizations on 
campus. The Admissions Office at Boston College valued 
the Involvement of the students in all areas of the 
program because they could be assigned to positions of 
responsibility as well as clerical duties. The students had 
the advantage of personal understanding and enthu- 
siasm that let the prospective applicant feel more at ease. 
The Admissions Office was confident in the professiona- 
lism that the B.C. student showed to the applicants. 



ENVIRON- 
MENTAL 
ACTION 
CENTER 

Loving Nature 



The Enviponmental Action Center of 
Boston CoUege was a group of people 
who loved nature and wanted to pre- 
serve the present environment. The 
club had a three-pronged thrust: Educa- 
tion, Appreciation and Conservation. 
Under the heading of education, it 
sponsored a series of talks and discus- 
sion on Environmental Issues ranging 
from Toxic Waste and Acid Rain to 
Endangered Species and Animal Ex- 
perimentation. 



STUDENT 

TRANSFER 

CENTER 

Transfering Students 



The Transfer Center kept an extensive, up-to-date 
GoUection of undergraduate and graduate catalogues, 
and a file of educational opportunities. The staff 
encouraged those interested in transferring and trans- 
fers to Boston CoUege to visit the office. Volunteers were 
welcome to assist in staffmg the office, as well. The 
Transfer Center was extremely useful In answering 
questions concerning various aspects of life at B.C. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Katie Brick, Ken Pui mwtt, Deanne Evans, Barbi Walther 
(Chairperson;, El MacLellan (Advisor). 1st ROW: David M. Smith, Ernest W. 
Grumbles (Treasurer), Amy Bherts, Tammy Fierro, Marc Passman (Secretary). 



64 Service 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Lisa Kalp. 1st ROW: Susan Dileo, Mark Francesconi 
(Junior Represenatlve), Irene MelvUle (Junior Ftepresenative), Leonard Riz^. 2nd 
ROW: Mary Ellen Long, Mary Gallagher, Pola Abbonizio, Rick McKenna 
(Treasurer), Vyto Jurgela. Srd ROW: Ken Karan, Chris Schmitt, Paul Bielaklewlz 
(Sophomore Represenatlve), Steven Waxman, Lenny Mirra (Secretary). 



GOLD 

KEY 

SOCIETY 

Serving BC 



The Gold Y'j'-j ;/.'uety was a ser^/ice- 
orlented orgfUiizatlon that gave 
students the opportunity to serve the 
Boston College community. For 50 years 
the Gold Key Society's motto of "Service 
and Sacrifice" haxl attracted interested 
students, making it one of the most 
prosperous and popular organizations 
on campus. Along with service, the Key 
stressed the importance of friendship 
and community within the organiza- 
tion, as well as at Boston College. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Marlbel Quinones, Yvette Desroslers-Alphonse, Ivlerediih Maoaulay, CataJina 
Pescatore, Jack Rogers, Sandy Jenks, Pauy 0,Brian,Kel]y Maskara, Linda Chaudron, Paul Veeder IIL 1st 
ROW: Stephanie Raudonis, Kathleen McGall, Michele MeCallion, Meg Shimer, Mary Cronin, Ellzaheth 
Robinson, Rosemarie LaFleur, Denise Riociardi, Jeffrey King, Mary Lane, Mary Kenney, Russen Turk, 
Gregory Pollard, Gina Birmingham, Mary Cingari, Patrick Kelly. 2nd ROW: Stephen E. Ferrucci, 
Fredrick B. Lorenz, Karen Walker, Pat Garry, Tim Boyce, Maura Ftearden, Jeff Card, John Rushford, 
Michael GiardleUo, Mark Cannon, Maureen MacFarlane, Rob Andrews, Daniel Shea. 



PARAPRO- 
FESSIONAL 
LEADER 
GROUP 

Leadership 



Founded In 1958, the Paraprofes- 
sional Leader Group was an organiza- 
tion that had a dual purpose. It strove to 
serve the Boston College community 
and to provide selected students with 
leadership training. The group was 
composed of students who demon- 
strated leadership skills and potential 
and who were committed to assisting 
those who desired to develop these same 
skills. The organization was guided by 
the Director of University Counseling 
Services, Weston Jenks. 



Service 65 



STUDENT 

JUDICIAL 

BOARD 

"Guilty" or "Not" 



All Boston College undergraduate 
students were within the jurisdiction of 
the Student Judicial Board. The board 
was composed of twenty-eight regular 
members and four chairpersons whose 
Job was to hear and decide upon cases 
concerning campus regulations. Gases 
were submitted to the board from fact 
fmdmg meetings by an Assistant Dean 
of Students or by the Dean of Students. 

The authority of the Student Judicial 
Board was delegated from the Dean of 
Students. Decisions which could be 
reached within the board were "guUty" 
or "not gmlty". 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Brian MlUer (Chaarman), John Werner (Chairman), Pamela Qiiinlan 
(Chairperson), Steve Solomon, Ken Tlangco, Jim Taglia, (Ways and Means Chairman), Tim Mitchell. 1st 
ROW: (3€orgina Arrieta, Jim McGUlivray, Monica Corrado, Anne Baeza, Kerry Sullivan, Steve Kaminski, 
Peter Daniels, Gina Signorello, Virginia WeUer, Beth Choi, Melinda OUver. 2ncl ROW: Tara Sweeney, 
Rosanna Fay, Jim Dentzer, Ginny Bevelock, Gary D. Boone, Frances J. Evans, Don Mannl, Paul Chebator 
(Advisor), Steven PeRegrino. 



WOMEN'S 

RESOURCE 

CENTER 

Today's Women 



The Boston College Women's Center, 
established in the spriog of 1973, was a 
warm, comfortable place on campus 
where women were encouraged to talk 
about, learn about and explore the 
many possibilities open to women in 
today's changing world. The Center was 
also a place for sharing with others the 
problems and worries confronting 
women in today's society. The Resource 
Center was not a club, espousing one 
single viewpoint. Rather, It was a place 
for all women on campus, of all 
backgrounds and beliefs, to gather, 
learn and grow together. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Lisa Birmingham, Donna Manocchio, Aimee BucciareUl, Lisa Cass, 
Helen Boyle, Ann Morgan, Patricia HUlman. 



66 Service 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Brian McA'Nulty (Treasurer), Jeffrey Demaso (VlcePresident), 
Richard Tuelle (President), Fr. Mahoney (Moderator). 



BELLAH- 
MIITE 
LAW 
ACADEMY 

Careers in Law 



The Beilarrrilne Law Academy was 
named for Saint Robert Bellarmlne, SJ, 
a famous Jesuit Cardinal and a dis- 
tinguished theologian and canon 
lawyer. It was one of the oldest organiza- 
tions on the Boston College campus. 

The aim of the Academy was to intro- 
duce students to various areas of the law 
in order to acquaint them with the 
numerous possibilities for lawyers in 
contemporary society. 




LEFF TO RIGHT; BOTTOM: John Deleo (Treasurer),Sandra Duffy (Organizational 
Manager), Gloria Rionda (Secretary). 1st ROW: Vinny Silvestri (Vice President), 
Timothy Guarrieri (President). 



COMPUTER 

SCIENCE 

ACADEMY 

Computer Careers 



The Computer Science Academ.y 
sponsored social and professional 
events speclficaUy related to the various 
aspects, academic and professional, of 
the computer science field. Academy 
participants gained a better knowledge 
of the many areas of computer science. 

The events sponsored by the 
Computer Science Academy mcluded 
semiinars, speakers and socials. These 
activities allowed students to establish 
and maintain contacts with companies 
m an informal atmosphere. 



Pre-Professional 67 



ACCOUITTIUG 
ACADEMY 

Accountiiig Careers 



The Accounting Academy in 1 986 was a unified group 
committed to sponsoring events for the benefit of 
accounting students and those interested in business. 
These events were designed to Inform members inter- 
ested in careers in accounting. With Professor Laurie 
Pant as moderator, the events were run successfully and 
benefited the student community as a whole. 

Academy events in the first semester Included a 
Resume Critique Workshop, Careers in Accounting 
Night, Assertiveness Interviewing, Mock Interviews, 
Office Visits to "Big 8" firms and socials designed for in- 
teraction with the faculty. 



BIOLOGY 
ASSOCIATION 



Health. Related 



The Biology Association was a new organization re- 
named in the 1985-86 academic year. (It was formerly 
known as the Biology Caucus). Under UGBC restructur- 
ing, it was incorporated into the larger structure of 
Academic Affairs, along with all other Arts and Sciences 
Associations. This enabled the Association to expand 
through the use of UGBC benefits. 

The Biology Association worked very closely with the 
Mendel Club. Together they co-sponsored events which 
enriched biology and health related majors. Included In 
these were: the Bloethlcs Conference, Medical School 
Admissions Night, Graduate School Admissions Night 
and Biology Careers Night. The turnout at these events 
indicated that the Biology Association was fulfilling a 
very vital need at Boston College. 



ECONOMICS 
ASSOC- 
lATIGET 

Economic Outlooks 



The Economics Association, formerly 
the Economics Caucus, was a student 
organization open to aU undergraduate 
economics majors and those interested 
in economics. The Association provided 
a channel of communication between 
the Economics Department and 
students. This year's officers were 
Loretta Lure (president), Freddy 
Schauder IV (vice-president), Brian 
Murphy (treasurer), Volma "Llbby" 
Straker and Michelle Guzowskl 
(secretaries). 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Loretta Lure, Frederick Schauder, MlcheUe Guzowskl, Brian 
Murphy Susan Winfleld, Volma Straker. 



68 Pre-Professional 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Patricia Dentremont (Public Relations), Anne O'Mally (Treasurer), M. Eileen 
Taylor (Organizational Coordinator), Michael Nyklwlcz (Chairperson), Andrea Beutner (Membership 
Director), Kelly Aherne (Secretaiy), Helen Rinella (Co-Publicity Director). 1st ROW: Greg Zuecher, Lee 
Rlzz, John Goodwin III, Mike Russ, Michael Wirin, Laura Mlddleton, Pablo Sabio, Stephen Parisi. 2nd 
Row: Maiy Lee Bolan, Darcy lies, Lisa FucUe, Lorrain Haley, Brian Harrington, Donnamarle Schmitt, 
Michael Dubois, Anthony Carpi, Joseph Gesmundo. 



THE BC 

FILM 

BOABD 

Weekly Films 



When the Boston College Film Board 
began, It was composed of a small group 
of students who, under the supervision 
of the Offlce of Student Programs and 
Resources, presented films on campus. 
The members also distributed a ballot to 
the student body and tabulated the 
results, deciding the schedule for the 
following semester. Unfortunately, 
membership declined and the Board 
coUapsed in 1975. OSPAR realized the 
need for the organization and reorga- 
nized the Board in the fall of 1976. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Phillip Carter (President), Anne Donahue (Secretary), Michael 
McGaUion (Vice President), Richard DeVerna (Treasurer). 



FIUAJSrCE 
ACADEMY 

Finance Careers 



The Finance Academy was a student- 
faculty forum designed for those mter- 
ested in finance. It provided students 
with an opportunity to expand their 
grasp of the field of fmance and become 
closer to the faculty through joint 
endeavors and close, informal commu- 
nication. Functions such as student- 
faculty meetmgs, socials and Alumni 
Night aided efforts In this area. 

Bringing together the academic and 
business worlds through meetings, 
seminars and career nights in topics of 
current and continuing mterest was 
another of the Academy's objectives. 
Efforts were made in this area to benefit 
the students. 



Pre-Professional 69 



FULTON 
SOCIETY 

FORENSICS 



Founded in 1870, the Pulton Society 
was the only academic, intereolleglately 
competitive team on cam.pus. It was said 
that in the late 1800's, Father Fulton 
pulled weU-spoken students out of class- 
rooms to form the "Literary Oratory 
Society". In 1890, Father Pulton died and 
the team was re-named in his memiory. 
The oratory which began the Fulton 
tradition developed into the award- 
winning traveUing debate team of the 
1960's, which became the individual 
events team of the 1980's. 

Last year, the team placed Third in the 
Northeast and First in Massachusetts, 
and competed nationally at the National 
Porensics Tournament. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Catherine John, Marie Murphy. 1st EOW: Chris Gassett (Secretary), Dyan 
McGuire, Christian Alfonsi. 2nd ROW: Kristie Velasco, Andrea Rocanelli.Susan Tardanico (President), 
Michael Janas (Vice President), David Ryan, Edward Ramos, (Jeorge Rodriguez. 3rd ROW: Amy Larson, 
John I. Goodwin, John Taylor, Dale Herbeck, Kim Wong, CJerald Dyer. 



FUTURE 

FEMALE 

EXECS 

Executives 



The Academy for Future Female Ex- 
ecutives was based upon what was previ- 
ously known as the Association for 
Women in Management. In reading 
through the club's constitution, the ex- 
ecutive officers realized the need to 
update the organization, making it into 
a more contemporary, more informative 
club. The constitution was changed and 
the goals were broadened to include the 
entire executive world, as opposed to 
focusing only on the SOM. 

The Academy was particularly con- 
cerned with the experience of women in 
the executive world and how that ex- 
perience was shaped by interactions of 
women and men. 




LEPr TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Patricia Summers, Sue Ellen GiacomeUi, Stephanie 
Daddian. 1st ROW: Mary Honan, Maria Malin. 



70 Pre-Professional 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Mary Joyce, Susan Logan Bedford, Keith Longson, 
Jennifer Rtzgerald, Carol Hesson. 1st ROW: Meg Lyons, Maureen Nickels, Jim 
Elsman, Robert Lum, Brian Pisacich, Hendrlcus Bocxe, James P. Morris, Chris 
Baxter, James P. Massman, Charles Spada, Kara Unger, Marina Scarlata. 



IITVEST 

MEUT 

CLUB 

Stock Market 



The Boston College Investment Club, 
started In 1982, was for students Inter- 
ested in investing wisely in the stock 
market. No previous experience was 
necessary. 

The club was unique, in that It was not 
Just to "paper invest". Rather, it drew 
from a $17,000 donation-based fand to 
actually purchase shares of stock. The 
experience gained was real, as the club's 
portfolio was managed without risk to 
individual members. 

Occasionally, the club would also have 
an investment professional come to a 
meeting to share his knowledge. 




MARKET- 



ACADEMY 



The Marketing Academy was open to 
aU undergraduate students enrolled at 
Boston College who possessed an inter- 
est in marketing. It gave students the 
opportunity to learn about the business 
world outside the classroom and to meet 
the marketing faculty on a one to one 
basis. Activities such as career nights, 
faculty-student socials, seminars and 
company information centers allowed 
students to increase their knowledge of 
the marketing field. 



LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Kathleen Zortman, Rosemarie Paladlno (Secretary), 
Diane Casey (Vice President), Kristin Stelnkrauss (President), Rosemary HUl. 1st 
ROW: Steve Buckingham (Chairman, Fundralslng), Dave Labbe (Chairman, 
Career Night), David Kaupp (Chairman, Seminar). 



Pre-Professional 71 



MATH 
SOCIETY 

Tutoring 



The Math Society was an organization 
of students interested in mathematics. It 
was open to all, regardless of major. It 
sponsored many social and academic 
events for students and faculty. It also 
worked with the Mathematics Depart- 
ment in tutoring and departmental 
commiittees. The Society was formed by 
students who wanted more out of miath- 
ematics than what was offered solely in 
the classroom. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Mary Mangraviti (Secretary), Brian McA'Nulty 
(President), Ned Rosen (Faculty Advisor), Carol Deuchler (Vice President). 1st 
ROW: John Monahan (Computer Consultant), Bernadette Thie (Treasurer). 



POLITICAL 
SCIENCE 
ASSOC- 
IATION 

Poli-Sci Interests 



The Political Science Association was 
sponsored by the Political Science 
Department and members concerned 
themselves with academic quality at 
B.C. The association had several 
committees with specific duties to 
perform. They usually held a social or 
luncheon for the students and faculty to 
discuss current events or personal 
matters. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Gina SignoreUo, Maribeth Bautlsta, Robert Graham, 
WiUlam Cohane, John Concanon III. 1st ROW: MeUnda Oliver, Scott Hayward, 
Karen Maskara, Mararet PechUio, Jennifer MitcheU, Heidi Nemec. 



72 Pre-Professional 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Tara Tamney (President), Professor James L. BDwditch (Go-Faculty 
Advisor), Don Baptiste (Public Fielations), Michael T. McGuire (Vice President). 



PERSONNEL 
MGMNT 
ASSOC- 
IA.TION 

Human Resources 



Personnel/human resource manage- 
ment was an expanding field both at 
Boston College as weU as in the profes- 
sional world. The aim. of the Personnel 
Management Association was to facili- 
tate communication between Boston 
College students and human resource 
professionals. The Personnel Manage- 
ment Association hoped to act as a 
forum for research and application of 
human resource management in the 
professional world. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: BOTTOM: Sofia Kotsopulos (Senior Representative), Richard Ferrara 
(President), Lorie Johnson (Secretary), Bob Berry (Operations Manager). 1st ROW: Keith 
Slatteiy (Sophomore RepresentaUve), John Petosa (Junior Representative), Doug Dahl 
(Sophomore Representative), Joe Koscluszek (Treasurer). 



SOM 
HONORS 

Helping Students 



The School of Management Honors 
Piiogram was the first program of its kind 
established in a coHegate or professional 
school of busiaess. The program, was 
designed to expand the education of 
talented students as they trained to be the 
business and community leaders of 
tomorrow. AU members took an active role 
iQ planning, executing and participating 
in the various program functions. 

The Honors Program offered Its students 
enriched opportunities in the classroom 
The Gurriciilum. consisted of intensified 
courses and courses in management 
communication skills, applied statistics 
and the senior project. A close faculty- 
student relationship fostered deep concern 
for each member's personal growth 



Pre-Professional 73 



MEUDEL 
CLUB 



Participation in Health. Fields 



The Mendel Club was an organization comprised of fu- 
ture health care professionals. One of its main goals was 
to provide active participation m the many different 
health fields. The hospital volunteer committee handled 
this responsibility by placmg premedlcal, predental and 
nursing students in the various health care facilities in 
the Boston area. The Mendel Club also provided mforma- 
tlon pertaining to health careers. Each year it sponsored 
the Undergraduate Bloethics Conference, which 
focused on the ethics of modern medicine. Medical 
School and Dental School Admissions Night allowed 
prospective candidates to gain first-hand knowledge 
from the deans of professional schools. The Awareness 
committee provided information on many pertinent so- 
cial problems ranging from alcoholism to the needs of 
the elderly. 



PRO- 
LIFE 
COALITION 



Awareness 



Established in 1983, the Pro-Llfe 
Coalition of Boston College included over 
150 members, reflecting the great inter- 
est in the abortion issue on campus. The 
Coalition was predominantly an educa- 
tional group rather than a political 
group. Its purpose was to provide in- 
formation leading to heightened 
awareness of the phenom.enon of abor- 
tion and to encourage the pro-Ufe posi- 
tion on campus. The enthusiasm and 
dedication of members was the key to 
the group's success in meeting its goals. 



AMNESTY 
INTERNATIONAL 



Human Rights Work 

Amnesty International was a worldwide human rights 
organization which was mdependent of any poUtical 
ideology, economic interest or reUgious creed. It played a 
specific role within the overall spectrum of human 
rights work. The activities of the organization focused on 
the release of prisoners who had been detained 
anywhere for their beliefs, color, sex, ethnic origia or 
religion. They were referred to as "prisoners of con- 
science" because they had not used or advocated 
violence. Amnesty also advocated fair and early trials for 
aU political prisoners and worked on behalf of such 
persons detamed without charge or trial. The organiza- 
tion universally condemned the use of torture and the 
death penalty as a degrading treatment of punishment. 
The organization campaigned for the abolition of these 
practices. 




LEFT TO KlUHT: BOTTOM: Maria Young, Robert J. Cheney, S.J., Katie Gonlon, 
Shirley Lagerson, Thomas Ptestlvo. 1st ROW: Chris Donaghue, Ann Marl Vlcosla, 
WaUy MulUn. 



74 I're-Professional/Spectjic Issues 



cElroy 141 




OFFICE 

OF 

STUDENT 

PROGRAMS 

AJSTD 

RESOURCES 

OSPAR 



The Office of Student Programs and 
Rjesources (OSPAR) was a vital resource 
to the university community. It had two 
main functions: overseeing the student 
organizations affiliated with B.C. and 
advising all international students and 
scholars on campus. 

OSPAR, under the direction of Bill 
Thompson, advised the campus student 
organizations. The office did not simply 
effect student leaders. It effected any 
student who attended any university 
sponsored function, from campus 
lectures to Middle March Ball. Bill 
Thompson, along with assistant director 
Kim Ernsting, advised the club leaders 
and UGBC programm.ers. 

Jean Yoder, the International Student 
Advisor, and her assistant, Terry 
Wittner, m.et with aU international un- 
dergraduates, graduate students, and 
scholars. This involved advising as well 
as signing immigration papers for 
travelling. 

OSPAR was also responsible for 
coordinating the Freshmen Orientation 
program, the Leadership Awards 
Banquet, and the publishmg of the 
Boston College Student Guide. 



OSPAR 75 



''^ 












► '':;>''' ■■■" 






mi.-^, *■ 












78 Football 




Eagles Regroup in 85 



There was the Heisman Trophy, the 
Cotton Bowl, the Lambert Trophy, and a 
[,top five national ranking. 

The Boston College football program 
had come a long way from the 0- 1 1 record 
of 1978. 

Now, though, came the hardest part. 
They had to prove that the last three years 
had not been a fluke. There were whispers 
that this B.C. team was a flash in the pan, 
led by a 5-9 3/4 inch miracle worker named 
Doug Flutie. 

Flutie was gone, but just as important, 
what many considered the heart of the 
1984 team, was also missing: Steve 
Strachan, Mark Bardwell, Mark MacDon- 
ald, Tony Thurman, David Periera, Todd 
Russell, and Gerard Phelan. 

The 1985 team had a big load to carry 
when practice started in August, and the 
task at hand would not be an easy one. 

B.C. would open the season at the New 
Jersey Meadowlands to face defending na- 
tional champion Brigham Young in the 
third annual Kick-Off Classic. The 
schedule which would follow was rated as 
the fourth toughest in the nation. 

The 1984 team had been in many minds 



"Doug Flutie's team." The 1985 team 
would have to develop its own character, its 
own mode for success, and the only way to 
do that was to win. Indeed, there was 
promise for a successful season and a 
potential fourth consecutive bowl trip. In- 
deed, many pre-season publications had 
the Eagles ranked in their annual top 
twenty picks. 

What followed was a frustrating season 
for the team and its fans. At first glance a 4- 
8 final record would indicate a poor perfor- 
mance by a poor team. This was, however, 
hardly the case. What made the season even 
more frustrating was the fact that, except 
for one game, the Eagles could have con- 
ceivably won every other. 

The 28-14 loss to Brigham Young was a 
let down, but B.C. fans walked away liking 
what they saw. 

They saw Ail-American nose tackle Mike 
Ruth begin his quest for the Outland 
Trophy in fine style by registering twelve 
tackles, four sacks, and one interception. 
Television analyst Bud Wilkinson declared 
afterwards, "I don't know if I've ever seen a 
defensive lineman dominate a game the 
way Mike Ruth has tonight." The defense 



as a whole shut down the Cougar running 
attack, holding BYU's explosive offense to 
a paltry 27 yards on the ground. 

The Cougars exposed the weakness in_ 
the young B.C. defensive secondary. The 
Eagles were in the game at halftime 14-7, 
like most games that would follow, but 
could not stay with the national champions 
in the second half. The Boston College 
Eagles had lost their first post-Flutie game, 
but won their second against Temple, prov- 
ing that they could, after all, win without 
their Heisman Trophy winner. 

With this win, signal caller Shawn 
Halloran established himself as a capable 
quarterback, throwing for 250 yards. The 
Eagles, although surviving a first quarter 
scare, were in a commanding position 
throughout. A slim 9-7 lead at halftime 
turned into a 22-7 lead when Darren Flutie 
hauled in a roll-out pass from Halloran. 

After Temple intercepted one of 
Halloran's few bad passes, they stalled as a 
result of numerous illegal motion penalties 
and had to settle for a 31 yard Jim Cooper 
field goal. B.C. punted but got the ball back 
when a Chuck Gorecki sack forced a 
fumble. Five plays later, John Mihalik 

Football 79 



(continued body copy from page 79) 
scored from the two, giving Don Meridith 
reason to sing, "Turn out the lights, the 
party's over." But it wasn't. Temple added 
two late scores for a 28-25 final score, forc- 
ing the Eagle fans to take a second look at 
their team. Also of note was the fact that 
tailback Troy Stradford sustained a 
hamstring injury with under two minutes 
left to play. The Eagles would be without 
him for the year. This was a major reason 
for what would follow in the course of the 
B.C. offense. 

The Eagles had faded in the fourth 
quarter against Temple and would do so 
again against the Maryland Terapins. The 
Terps jumped out to a quick 10-0 lead 
before you could say "Morning tailgate is 
over, time to go to the game." The Eagles 
would close the gap to 10-7 and would only 
trail by three at halftime. Both teams traded 
touchdowns early in the third, but a missed 
extra point made the margin of difference 
only four points. This led to a fake field 
goal attempt on a fourth and four, but be- 
cause of a mixup on the bench, the Eagles 
took a delay of game penalty. Ken Kanzler 
hooked the ensuing field goal attempt and 
instead of a boost, the mixup proved to be a 
thorn in the side of the Eagles. The defense 
could not hold together in the fourth 
quarter, and Maryland scored 14 points for 
the 33-13 final. 

The Eagles reinstated their reputation as 
being one of the most exciting teams in 
College Football the following Saturday 
afternoon in Pittsburgh. The team trailed 
the Panthers 22-21 with just 1:21 left. And 
it was fourth down. Why be conservative? 
Let's go for it ("it" being a touchdown), 
thought head coach Jack Bicknell. "It's one 
of those plays, if it works, great, if not, you 
hate it. Shawn was able to pull the trigger 
and put it right in there," Bicknell said 
afterwards. One of those plays was a twenty 
yard slant pass pattern to Kelvin Martin, 
pre-empted by Ken Bell acting as a decoy 
when he dove over the top without the ball. 
Martin had beaten the coverage, as he had 
done all day to the tune of 172 yards, and 
received a perfect throw from Halloran. 
Touchdownl Gametime. Highlight of the 
season. 

Next, Miami was coming to town. 
Remember them? You know, the Miracle 
and all that stuff. The canonization of St. 
Flutie? The Hurricanes did not forget. And 
they brought along 'Hurricane Gloria' to 
make sure the Eagles did not forget. The 
final was 45-10. 

The Eagles were in this game, trailing 
only 10-3 and had marched from the Miami 
44 yard line to the eight. A 1 0- 1 tie seemed 
imminent. However, instead of 10-10, the 




score turned out to be a demoralizing 17-3. 
On second and goal, Halloran threw into 
heavy endzone coverage and watched 
Selwyn Brown return the interception 100 
yards. 

However, the Eagles scored early in the 
third quarter to close the gap to 17-1 0. This 
would be as close as they would come. The 
Miami defense followed by shutting down 
Halloran. The Hurricane offense followed 



by erupting for 21 fourth quarter points. 
The game marked a "great opportunity," 
according to Bicknell, and the Eagles never 
really did recover. They were 2-3. They 
were frustrated. 

The Eagles followed the Hurricane 
decimation with a less than spectacular 20- 
10 victory over Rutgers, who had tied 
Miami only weeks before. Both teams 
needed this game: Rutgers, to finally 



80 Football 




Football 81 




82 loolfmll 



(continued body copy from page 80) 

register a win (they were 0-2-1), and the 
Eagles, to once again chmb to the .500 
record they had hovered at all season long. 

Both teams traded field goals and the 
Eagles only needed the Kelvin Martin post 
pattern touchdown and David Rooney's 
second field goal (a 20 yarder) of the day. 
Tyrone Taylor would cap an 80 yard drive 
midway through the final quarter to put the 
game out of reach. 

So at 3-3, the Eagles entered Mitchie 
Stadium. A win would set the stage for an 
eastern showdown with West Virginia the 
following week. But the Eagles would be 
facing the wishbone, the offense they failed 
to corral last year. This year was no 
different. The 45-14 final was the only 
game of the year the Eagles failed to be in. 
The defense could not control the middle. 
Nor could the defense control the ends, for 
quarterback Tory Crawford turned the 
corners at will. The Cadets had been under- 
estimated, and the Eagles had paid the 
price. 

The Mountaineers were coming to town. 
This was labeled as a 'must' game to fans to 
save the season. B.C. hadn't been able to 
defeat West Virginia for four years. This 
team had the chance, and at the beginning 
of the game, it had the lead, 6-0 as a result 
of a 1-yard plunge. However, the PAT was 
missed. This was all the scoring the Eagles 
would do for the day. West Virginia tacked 
on seven points in the second, and six more 
in the third. The Eagle offense was strug- 
gling. Steve Peach came out onto the field 
early in the third quarter to thunderous 
applause. But he, like Halloran, couldn't 
get the offense to score, proving that the 
problem this year was not Shawn Halloran. 

Cinncinati 24, B.C. 17. When it rains, it 
pours. Although the Eagles dominated the 
game in the statistical categories (432-333 
advantage in total offense), they still were 
unable to put the ball in the endzone when 
the opportunity presented itself. Three 
times the Eagles marched down the field 
and failed to register a point. 

Well, it was evident the Eagles were not 
going to a bowl, but that didn't mean they 



could not have fun being bowl busters. Un- 
defeated Penn State was on the agenda, the 
team that went 6-5 and denied the Eagles a 
chance for the national championship with 
a 37-30 upset in 1984. Now it was the Eagles 
turn. PSU was slated for a New Year's Day 
Bowl, but in the minds of the Eagles, the 
road to the bowl passed through Boston. 
The Eagles traveled to State College and it 
was evident that jet lag was not a hindrance 
as B.C. clung onto a 5-3 lead at halftime. 
With 3:01 left in the half, the Eagles faced a 
fourth and I at the Nittany Lion 24 yard 
line. Bicknell opted for the field goal in- 
stead of going for the first down. 

The Eagles opened the second half with a 
Chuck Gorecki sack of quarterback John 
Shaffer which resulted in a Bill Thompson 
fumble recovery. Two plays later, fullback 
Ken Bell ripped off a 54 yard touchdown 
run to give the Eagles a 1 2-3 lead. With 5:13 




left, Shaffer scored the Nittany Lions first 
touchdown. The key play was a D.J. Dozier 
42 yard scamper along the left sideline on 
fourth and 1. This was the Lions' only big 
play of the game. The defense came up 
with a big play of its own, and it turned out 
to be the game winner. On third and 4, 
Halloran stepped up into the pocket look- 



ing for Shawn Dombrowski cutting over the 
middle. Instead, Lion tackle Tim Johnson 
tipped the pass to teammate Mike Russo 's 
hands and the 262 pound tackle rumbled 
into the endzone. The play would mark the 
end of the scoring and the end of the game. 

Next up was Syracuse. B.C. bitterly 
remembered what happened in 1983 when 
the Eagles were heading for the Fiesta bowl, 
only to be ruined when they were upset 21- 
10. It was B.C.'s turn, but it was not to be. 
The Eagles went on to lose 41-21 in front of 
a thundering Carrier Dome crowd of 
45,790. There was no stopping the 
Orangemen, as they jumped out to a 14-0 ' 
lead at 10:06 of the second quarter. 

However, the Eagles responded quickly, 
with Ken Bell leaping over the top on a 
fourth and goal. Syracuse would score ten 
more points before the Eagles would get on 
the board again, but by this time it was 24- 
1 4 with 7 : 1 7 left in the third quarter. Senior 
Scott Gieselman went on to break Brian 
Brennan's career reception record, notch- 
ing his 116 catch on B.C.'s next possession. 
The Eagles were not able to fend off the 
Orangemen, who scored on a second and 
goal Don Mac Pherson plunge. The Eagles 
brought themselves back when Halloran 
found Kelvin Martin from the 14 yard line. 
After a failed onside kick attempt by the 
Eagles, Syracuse held a sustained drive that 
led to a MacPherson to Scott Schwedes 
touchdown pass with just 2:43 left. 

Only the Holy Cross game remained in 
the Eagles 1985 campaign. The Eagles kept 
their pride as they ousted their old rival 
Crusaders 38-7 behind a great perform- 
ance by Kelvin Martin and a tumult of HC 
turnovers. 

Martin opened the scoring with a school 
record 93 yard punt return and later scored 
on a deflected 35 yard TD pass from 
Halloran. Ken Bell also ended his collegiate 
career with 131 yards rushing and a touch- 
down, and Mike Ruth was named one of the 
four finalists for the Outland Trophy dur- 
ing this game. 

Tony Zarillo and Sean Hennessey 



84 Football 




Football 85 




86 Football 




Eagle's complete another touchdown (top left) ; 
Shawn Halloran searches out his receiver (top 
right) ; A scramble for the ball with Carl Pellegata, 
Bill Romanowski, and Karl Kreshpane (lower 
right) ; Coach Jack Bicknell tries to give his team 
some helpful directions (lower center) ; The BC 
Eagle discouraged after Temple intercepts the 
ball (lower left). 




-w 








Noble Netmen 



They said that the only two sure things in 
Hfe were death and taxes. However, a 
supplement needed to be added to this 
short list — the Men's Tennis Team captur- 
ing the Big East title. For the fifth consecu- 
tive season, the Big East Crown would 
sojourn in Chestnut Hill as Coach Mike 
MacDonald's 1985 tri-captained squad, 
probably one of the best prepared and 
hardest working in the East, came through 
with yet another prosperous autumn of 
tennis. 

Although it was only one of many 
highpoints during the 1985 campaign, the 
Big East title was, by far, the most im- 
portant. Senior tri-captains, Carlos Silva, 
Luis Nunez and Bobby Conklin, led the 
team to the tournament site in Weekapug, 
Rhode Island, intending to keep their Big 
East record spotless. The Eagles simply 
blew away the competition as they reached 
seven of nine finals, ultimately winning five 
of them. Steve Griffen, a junior and the 
number one seeded player on the team, 
won the singles title, and, along with Carlos 
Silva, seized the number one doubles crown 
as well. Luis Nunez and Bobby Bortnik also 
garnered titles as they won the 4th and 6th 
flights, respectively. Bortnik, like Griffen, 
was also able to secure a victory in doubles 
"play as he paired with Bobby Conklin to" 
■take the 2nd flight doubles crown. As a- 
result of the victory, Nunez, Silva and Con- 
klin, who had contributed immensely to the 
development of the successful tennis 
program, could graduate in May with the 
knowledge that they never lost a Big East 
title during their productive stay at B.C. 

It would be unfair to dwell solely upon 
the success of the Eagles within the Big East 
when they also had several other commen- 
dable performances. They finished a 
strong third, behind Harvard and Brown, 
in the New England Championships as 



Steve Griffen defeated Harvard's national- 
ly ranked star, 6-7,6-2,6-3, marking the 
first B.C. win against a number one 
Crimson player. The team also received an 
invitation to the ECAC Tournament in 
Princeton, New Jersey. Since only the top 
16 teams in the East were invited to partici- 
pate, this justifiably reflected the develop- 
ment of Coach MacDonald's blossoming 
B.C. powerhouse. 

Hopefully, the monotony of success will 
continue to plague the Eagles next season 
as Griffen and Bortnik return, along with 
four freshmen who were able to compete 
with such experienced teammates as Silva, 
Nunez and Conklin. When given the 
opportunity to prove themselves, as they 
did against Brandeis in an 8-1 win in 
Waltham, Mike Franchi, Mike Deluca, Bob 
Nestle and Steve Sigalove were all im- 
pressive. 

With the continued influx of talent, the 
development of the program and the in- 
creased success, who knows how far the 
team will go in the future? One thing's for g 
sure, no one will ever accuse the EaglecS 
tennis team of being inconsistent. 



Paul McGahren 





Meg Murphy 



88 Men's Tennis 




'l »»■ ,l»».«»'*l ll.MiMll»llll ^^ . , W ,^ ? S' 

■ - I „r I -I ' T . . » ^4 >i' 



-V_.,i, ,— 



Ssr^***** 



Vlrnlv I'«i/^;.v 83 



Amy Richardson lands a winning shot (above); Katie 
Molumphy exhibiting strains of her winning serve 
(right). 



90 Women's Tennis 







Aces Once Again 



The B.(^ Women's Tennis Team had 
their work tut out for them. They didn't 
worry, though. "We are coming off a great 
year," said Coach Howard Singer, "and we 
have some people coming back." Last year, 
the Eagles finished 13-4 in the New 
England Championship and second-place 
in the Big East tourney. F"ortunately, the 
team lost only one player to graduation, .so 
the backbones of" the '85 team carried over 
into this sea,son. 

As in years past, Syracuse emerged as 
B.C.'s top rival. The Ladies in Orange had 
traded Big flast tides with the Eagles for the 
past three seasons. If this pattern were to 
continue, B.CI would get another taste at 
' the championship in 1986 and make it the 
Year of the Eagle. 

Once again, B.C. was led on the court by 
number one singles player and two time 
N.E. champ, Katie Molumphy- Going into 
this season, Katie was ranked 38th in 
women's collegiate tennis. Sharing captain 
^'duties with this outstanding junior was 
.senior, Elaine Power. The lone freshman 
on the team was Berit Hanna, who often 
was the doubles partner (jf both Power and 
sophomore. Amy Schmidt. Other outstan- 
ding members of the team were .seniors, 
Cristina Callahan, Julie Walsh, Amy 
Richardson, Lisa Rosamilia and Heidi 
Kanichika. 

Boston College's record for the fail 
season was perfect, posting wins over 
UConn, BU, Brown and Dartmouth. 
Singles matches were won by Richardson, 
Schmidt, Walsh and Hanna against Brown. 
Although losing a tough singles match, 
Molumphy teamed with Schmidt to win in 
the doubles round, as did the .senior pair of 
Power and Callahan. In tournament play, 
Molumphy won the flight A singles tide at 
the Llnity Life Teimis Classic, while Richar- 
dson took a third in flight B. The tandem of 



Hanna and Power also placed third in the B 
flight doubles round. 

In ECAC tourney action, Molumphy was 
upset in flight A singles, but teammate 
Richard.son advanced to quarterfinal play, 
before being stopped by the eventual 
winner. Rosamilia and Kunichika both 
made it to the quarterfinals in flights B and 
(;, respectively. Also, in flight C, irosh Berit 
Hanna was victorious in the consolation 
final. The doubles round .saw the sopho- 
more tandem of Kanichika and Richardson 
advancing to the quarter finals in flight B, 
while co-captains, Molumphy and Power 
also bowed out in quarter finals in flight B. 

The Big East tourney was somewhat a 
diappointment as Syracuse took the title for 
the second straight year. Once again, B.C. 
finished second be.st, finishing ten points 
shy of the championship and copping two 
individual titles. Kate Molumphy 
succeeded in winning her third consecutive 
Big East night A Singles Championship. 
The second individual title was won by 
Hanna, the only Eagle to top a Syracuse 
player in the tourney. She cHd this in flight 
E singles competition. Syracuse swept all 
three doubles matches. The B.C. pairs 
managed to last to the semis in A and B, 
while the two seniors. Power and Callahan, 
advanced as far as the finals before losing 
the C tide. 

Although Coach Singer was dissatisfied 
with this year's tournament, he did recognize 
that his players may have been victims of 
fatigue, noting that they had been playing 
continually since August 26. Overall, 
Boston College finished a respectable 4th in 
the ECAC and, con.sidering the number of 
underclassmen on this team, the Eagle 



in the futuie. 



C. Foley 



Tir^ 




Eagle Spikesters 

Things could only get better. The Boston from the University of Rhode Island. With 



College Volleyball team was coming off a 
bleak 0-29 season and was heading into 
this one with a different coach and a fairly 
young squad. The Lady Eagles with new 
skipper Gary Gidea, former coach at 
Wellesley High and at the Junior Olympic 
Team, had nowhere to go but up. Still hav- 
ing to contend with a lack of scholarships, 
(B.C. only offered one or two while other 
Big East teams could accomodate their 
entire team), Gildea strove to develop his 
new players into a winning unit. 

Much individual talent was found on the 
'85-'86 squad. Senior captain Michelle 
Hanson, with four years varsity experience, 
played the role of seasoned veteran as well 
as that of morale booster. She, along with 
the women's V-ball team, cheered on her 
mates in times of need. Six-foot sopho- 
more, Karen Ramsey was another return- 
ing player, as was Junior Olympian, Ellen 
McCarthy. Freshman, Eileen Hoban was a 
very promising member of the team, being 
5T0" with a vertical jump of 32 inches. 

'85-'86 proved to be the year of the trans- 
fers. From the University of Arizona came 
senior Jo Ann Biszantz. Midge Connolly, 
who turned out to be a stellar player 
throughout the year, transfered to B.C. 



this much potential, the Lady Spikers were 
ready to try and erase from memory last 
year's disastrous record. 

Early losses to Holy Cross and MIT 
served as reminders of past defeats and, 
although they beat Harvard, the Eagles 
failed to gain any confidence. Lack of a win- 
ning attitude added with poor scheduling 
played a part in B.C's three consecutive 
downfalls in two days. The Day of the 
Huskies proved fatal for Boston College. 
The Eagles, after an exhausting defeat at 
the fists of UConn, dropped the second 
match to a fresh Northeastern squad. The 
following day did not prove much brighter, 
as B.C. was defeated by a very impressive 
Providence team. The Friars were just too 
much for B.C., despite a strong perfor- 
mance from Connolly. 

"We've got the talent," said Gildea at the 
beginning of the season, but a lack of 
cohesiveness and self-assurance seemed to 
cancel out this asset. Great individual 
efforts were the strong points of this year's 
season. The Eagles had bettered their 
record and , with the core of young players, 
hoped to continue improving. 

C. Foley 




92 Women's Volleyball 




Women's Volleyball 93 






94 Sailinjr 





Sail Away 




Lacking ruiids, a coach and a boalhoiisf. 
tlic B.(;. sailing u;ain started out with three 
strikes against them. But, this year, B.C;. did 
not count those one, two, three strikes. In- 
stead, they counted backwards, from 27 to 
16, which was how they were ranked in na- 
tional college sailing at the end ol the 
.season. 

The B.C. .Sailing team was a member of 
the New England Intercollegiate Sailing 
Association, one of ten different associ- 
ations across the country, encompassing 
275-300 teams. Led by captain Steve Ulian, 
the Doug Flutie of the sailing team, the 
thirty members of the B.C. crew competed 
in five to six regattas a weekend. These 
regattas spanned the East coast fiom Navy 
in Annapoliss, MD to Maritime in Maine. 
However, the majority of the best regattas 
were located in the New England area 
where the competition was the stiffest. 

The regatta wins of key importance to 
leading the B.C. sailing team to its 
noteworthy national standing, were 1st 
place in The New England Sloop Champi- 
onship Eliminations, 4th place in The New 
England Sloop Championships, 1st place in 
The Northern Series at MLF. and 8th place 
fn The Shell Trophy (Atlantic Coast quali- 
fying regatta). In any of the major regattas, 
which boasted the best teams iti the 
country, our team was in the top eight 
boats. 

The Shell Trophy was the climax of the 
fall season, with skippers Steve Ulian and 
Jeff Lewis holding their own against the 
very best teams in the country. Although 



B.C;. missed qualifying for the Atlantic 
Coasts by twelve points and two places, ihis 
regatta was the final and most inqxutani 
step in leading the B.C.'s rank as Ifnh in the 
nation. 

The B.(;. Women's Sailing leam, led by 
captain Lara Ca.ssidy, also had a siicccsslul 
.sea.son, coinpeiing in more inlerseclional 
regattas than evei before and averaging 
sixth throughout the year. The hardcore 
women skippers for tfie season were Tara 
Cassidy and freshman, Anne Haviland. 
'1 he team, which continued to gain 
strength, looked forward to an even 
brighter future. 

In November, B.C. hosted an invitaiif)nal 
which was professionally run by Sieve 
Regine and Seniors Mike Jordan and Brian 
Murphy. Sailing for B.(^. were Sophomore 
skippers Keith Longson and Kevin 
Beaulieu. 

The team was composed of thirty- 
members who boasted an array of original 
nicknames reflecting their different perso- 
nalities. They came together in the fall of 
1985 and, not only their sailing ability, but 
also their unity made it possible for them to 
accomplish the goals at which they had 
aimed. 

Approaching their spring season with: 
uncontrollable enthusiasm, this unified 
group sailed down the Charles, keeping 
their eyes peeled to the horizon and the Na- 
tional Championships in May, 1986. , 

Karen SuUwan 



ȴ, 




96 W (jnm^s<:ro<iatCoTlnlfy ' 



Harriers Fare Well 



The Women's Cross Country team had 
reached great strides. Franklin Park, the 
home course of Boston College's cross 
country team was the place of much 
success. The highlight of the season was 
definitely the Greater Boston Cross- 
country Championships. The Eagles 
finished with four runners in the top seven 
finishers and walked away with their first 
ever Greater Boston title. 

As "stars" and team co-captains, Michelle 
Hallet and Ann Fallon contended that 
strong leadership and dedication were an 
important factor for a successful team. 
They considered themselves quite fortu- 
nate to have a team that worked so well 



together. It was a great bunch ol girls all 
encouraging each other on the road to 
success. 

Although Hallet and Fallon would 
normally be looked to as the team's outstan- 
ding performers, coach Jack McDonald 
cited the team as a whole as the one outstan- 
ding performer. During McDonald's past 
eight years at B.C., he turned the Women's 
Cross Country team into a respected and 
solid unit. 

Virginia Conners, Gina Braz, Jennifer 
Weekes and Therese Doucette were five of 
McDonald's strong competitors who always 
put all their efforts into bringing the 
maroon and gold across the finish line first. 



Michele Hallett .strain.s as .she finishes the gruel- 
ling course (left); Senior Ann Fallon leads the 
pack (middle); Jennifer Weekes hopes the finish 
line is closer than graduation (right). 





Women's Cross Country 97 



Breaking Away 



After qualifying for the NCAA Track 
and Field Championships for the first time 
ever in 1984, the men's cross country team, 
headed by Coach Jack MacDonald, entered 
their 1985 campaign with high ex- 
pectations. And why not? They had Joe 
Rocha, who had been a runner up at the 
NCAA's, returning, as well as John 
Clopeck, Boston College's first ever track 
All American. Paul Plissey, another 
outstanding runner, would join these two 
celebrities. 

However, the year began with a few un- 
expected setbacks. Plissey was hampered 
with a bad knee, David Sullivan was 
sidelined with a kneecap injury, and Rocha 
pulled a hamstring, perhaps the Eagles' 
greatest loss. With these three vital people 
absent from competition, the team could 
have suffered major destruction. 

After placing fourth in the Greater 
Bostons, the Eagles rallied for what MacDon- 
ald called the highlight of the season, a 
third place finish at the Big East Champion- 
ships. Clopeck would run a 24:26 and go on 
to capture the Eagles' first ever individual 
title, one that he had had his eye on since 



preseason. "It was the one I was looking 
for," Clopeck would state afterwards. 

Due to the injuries, it seemed improbable 
for the Eagles to place as high as they did. 
The major reason for the turnabout was the 
fact that the freshmen — George Grant, 
Mike Pieroni and Mike Hersom — all high 
school state champions, learned to run 
college cross country. Grant placed 
eleventh at the Big East, in the process of 
setting a freshman record (25:42). "We 
started to get some performances and the 
confidence of our kids led to super perfor- 
mances in the Big East," praised MacDo- 
nald, "Placing third and having John win it 
was icing on the cake." 

During the 1985 campaign, it all came 
together. "We had people pull it together," 
surmised MacDonald, "It was a combina- 
tion of the new and the old. The veterans 
said, 'Hey, let's get it going. It's up to us. 
Let's do it.'" And they did. Because of this 
valiant team effort, the men's cross country 
team established themselves as a force to be 
dealt with. 

Sean Hennessey 




98 Men's Cross Country 




Men's Cross Country 99 




100 Women's Soccer 




"D"IS 
THE KEY 



DEFENSE. That was the name of the 
game for the Boston College Women's 
Soccer Team. Second year coach, Sue 
Kaplan guided the team through a very 
solid set of matches having been provided 
with a well balanced and well utilized group 
of athletes. 

The B.C. offense, at times during the 
season, seemed less than powerful. During 
its first five games the team scored just 
seven goals. Yet, amazingly, thoughout this 
period, the team earned a 5-0 record. 
DEFENSE. These kinds of results lead 
coach Kaplan to make statements such as, 
"We're dominating" and (obviously), "We 
played very well defensively". 

Outstanding players included members 
of all four classes, such as senior co-captain 
Karyn Hesse, whose well orchestrated pass 
to classmate Lynne Collins allowed B.C. to 
win the Radford game 1-0. On the defen- 
sive end, sophomore Eva Ciko provided 
constant intensity and talent. In addition, 
junior midfielder Maria Montuori 
provided much of the teams strength, rak- 
ing up ten goals by October 20th. Concern- 
ing the team, she commented, "We've had a 
great solid defense and the coaching has 
been excellent." DEFENSE. 

The team also included several freshman 
powerhouses including high school All- 
American Chris Garabaldi and halfback 
Nancy MacRina. Impressive scorer, Chris 
Johansen, whose sole goal against Spring- 
field College provided the team's margin 
of victory, also proved herself to be an im- 
T^ portant asset. 

1 Under former coach Mike LaVigne, the 
3 women seemed to embody a more con- 
^ trolled style. But, the team under coach 

2 Kaplan's charge seemed to have found its 
^ niche. DEFENSE. 



Tony Cammarota 



Women's Soccer 101 



Tough Luck 
Booters 



'['lie pjteiilial <jf the men's soccer team 
was soaring lo new -lieights. The F.agles were 
on ihe road to recovery. Coach Ben 
Brewster said that the team had a growing 
season, since it was not a championship year. 

One of the highlight games of the .season 
was the BC against Brigliam Voimg game. 
The Eagles fared well, as they defeated K\V 
bv tlie .score of 1-0. This game was held din- 
ing Homecoming Weekend (October 18- 
20). Both the oifense and the defense pla\ed 
well, as ihev held the game scoreless. It was 
not until the second half that a new candi- 
date to the team, freshman Dave Siilli\an, 
scored. This was the only goal for the F.agles. 
The defense played extremely well, as thev 
shut clown the Cougar scoring. 

The BC/Brown game presented another 
challenge for the team. Once again there was 
excellent offensive play from Ceorge Rico 
and Tonv Antiiiies. Rico knocked the first 
goal into the net early in the game. Brown 
was soon lo follow, with ancJther goal in the 



game, icj even up tlie .score. It wasnT 
until the last fifteen minutes of the _ 
game that BC scored again. Seniors, 
Brian de (iuzman, '!"odd foensing 
and Antunes combined their efforts 
to .score the final goal for BC. This 
brought the score to 2-1. I'nfoitun- 
ately, the defense could not hold 
Brown back, as they .stored within the 
last ten minutes to e.scape with a tie. 
A season with sixteen returning 
lettermen loomed to Ix; promising. 
But, a mixture of untimely goals 
and defensive lap.ses led to the loss 
of a championship .sea,son BC. l)oc:)t- 
ers dreamed about. Another "re- 
building" year hit the Heights as the 
soccer team replayed the 1984 
.season, such as a carlx)n copy, start- 
ing off extremely slow (seven games 
without a win), and salvaging the 
second half of the season with an 
alxjve average per foiinance. 



.jMA 



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102 Meri'.s Soccer 




Feeling of accomplishment as 
B.C. slops another goal (top left); 
Eyeing the ball with confidence 
(left); B.C. strives to reach the 
ball before the opponent (bottom 
left). 



104 Men's Rugby 





SKILLS 

AND 

THRILLS 

"No guts, No gloiy!" Ii is ilic iiioikj oI a 
rugby player. A sporl which has more hil- 
ling ihan An)cricati football and requires 
the physical endurante ol an Australian 
Rules Football player. A sp(jrl iti whidi no 
pads are worn, a full contact sport, a sporl 
called rugby. "Boston College has a rugby 
team?" pondered one bewildered co-ed. 
Well, Boston College Rugby was just a club, 
but the members played with all the viialily 
of any other team. 

Co-captains Scott Kerslake and John 

Siyachitema, headed the list of members on 

this club. Kerslake was a senior who played 

^inside center while "Sludge" (Siyachitema) 

J was the eight-man. Vinny Rella was another 

;;-,key member, who as junior played fly-half 

on this squad. 

The club posted a 5-1 record during the 
regular season, earning the ranking of fifth 
in New England. Along the way, the Eagles 
posted victories over Fordham 28-0, New 
England College 35-0, and Central Con- 
necticut State University 19-10, while tak- 
ing their only loss at the hands of Ivy 
League rival, Dartmouth. Only the post 
season tournament laid ahead for this club 
which impressed many opponents during 
the 1985 season. 

Rugby, a game which was claimed to be 
the greatest by those who played. Rugby, a 
game which was admired by some and a 
game which astonished others. Rugby, a 
game which was played with pure physical 
intensity. "No guts, No glory . . ." 

The Three Stooges awaiting for their turn to play 
(upper left); Tom O'Connor and his teammate 
approach their opponents (upper right); Ted 
Fischer, Marty Ashley and John Siyachitema 
wondering if the ball will fall their way (lower 
right). 



Men's Rugby 105 




106 Wrestling 




Grappling to the Top 



Geoff Why 



The Boston College wrestling team was a 
talented one indeed. Head coach Joe 
Guinta was back once again to guide the 
team, along with assistants Rich White and 
Rod Buttry. Buttry, a former Olympian, 
was a special plus for B.C. Not only did the 
team gain valuable knowledge from this ex- 
perienced wrestler, but it was also provided 
with the opportunity to practice with other 
Olympic wrestlers. 

There was an interesting twist to this 
year's squad - there were no seniors. 
However, the Eagles still had experienced 
members. Captains Tom Giacchetto and 
John Zogby were veteran members of the 
team. Junior Giacchetto had been wrestling 
on the collegiate level for three years. As a 
freshman, Tom placed third in the 190- 
pound weight class in the New England 



Championships and finished in the same 
spot the following year in the New England 
All-Star meet. Zogby, another junior, 
placed second in his weight class at last 
year's NE All-Stars. Both were well- 
prepared to meet this year's challenge. 

Other members of the team included 
junior, Ted Hughes and sophomores. Bob 
Radochia and Jamie Linkowski. Radochia 
alternated with Giacchetto between the 190 
and heavy weight divisions, and succeeded 
in copping a third place finish in the latter 
division in the AU-Star tourney his 
freshman year. Other sophomore 
standouts were Tim Martin and Bill 
Gallucci. Martin was a consistent performer 
in the 150-pound class, and although 
Gallucci was injured for the first part of the 
season, he planned to return to his winning 



form for the second half. Replacing 
Gallucci in the early part of the season was 
freshman, Alan Conkling. 

In the first part of the season, the B.C. 
grapplers faced their toughest opponents 
and posted a 3-5 record. Although losing 
early at Albany States, the team bounced 
back with strong wins over UMass-Boston 
and Williams. An important win came 
against fellow league member, Maine. The 
Eagles travelled to Cleveland for the 
Catholic School Nationalists in late 
January. 

The future looked quite promising for 
B.C. wresding. With such a young but ex- 
perienced team, plus increased recruiting, 
the Eagles should continue to fare well in 
the coming seasons. 



Wrestling 107 



STICK 
WOMEN 



A half-rounded club whacking at a tiny 
round projectile on an artificial surface. 
What is this insanity? It sounds funny, but 
it's a reality, it's the sport of field hockey. 
Girls in skirts? That's right, they dress up to 
play this game, but can they play? Oh my, 
they can play. 

"We're definitely capable of making the 
NCAA's this year," said field hockey coach 
Charlene Morett, in her second year at the 
Heights. That summed up the opportu- 
nistic and upstart squad's aspirations as the 
1985 field hockey season was about to 
begin. Why this optimism? Start with the 
fact that the Eagles were preseason ranked 
number eleven in the country and add that 
to the fact the Eagles were returning a 
"strong nucleus of seniors," according to 
Morett. 

Well, who was this returning "nucleus"? 
Linda Griffin led the cast, who returning 
after leading the Eagle's in scoring the 
season before. Shannon Murphy came back 
after netting five goals in 1984. Along with 
these two National Sports Festival partici- 
pants, the lady sticksters also returned third 
leading scorer Lori Kelfer, co-captain Trish 
Riehl and Anne Duncan. This was the 
nucleus Morett raved about, and it would 
be a most important link in the outcome of 
the 1985 field hockey team. 

With a nucleus must come a protective 
shield around it, and the Eagles lived up to 
that tradition. Three key recruits included 
Christine D'AUessandro, Maura Sullivan 
and Anne Granger. Add those names to 
Cindy Knudsen, Beth Kneeling, Theresa 
Degirolamo and goalkeeper Cathy O'Brien 
and B.C. stacked up well for its Division I A 
schedule of 1985. 

The players were set, the schedule was 
made, what was left? The actual playing of 
the season was all that kept the Eagles away 
from the post-season tourney. Would the 
Eagles fulfill their goal and enter into the 
magical world of the NCAA tourney? Time 
would tell. As for Charlene Morett, two of 
her goals for the upcoming season were to 
"create versatility among the players on the 
field," and, "get defensive players to be > 
more offensive." S. 

The scene was set for batde, but (Hily one j: 
question remained; why do they dress up to = 
play this game? 

108 Field Hockey 





Field Hockey 109 




Chris flanlcv 
Hoping for his first hole-in-one (above); Try- 
ing to line up a birdie putt (above right); Link- 
ing it up for B.C. (bottom); Eyeing a perfect 
drive (right page — left) ; Conquering the sand 
trap (right page — right). 




jpi«d»WW3ii!*'*^' 



■■ ^i»^^:^-i/r-yfrU 




110 Golf 




rni^i 



Tale 




The Eaj^li's Coif lefim li-lt ii would have 
another respectable year, with the icturii of 
thirteen veterans, most of them seniors. 
They lived up to this expectation. 

Under liie guidance of C-oath K<l(lie 
Carroll, ilie B.C golfers prepared for the 
new season. The Eagles had talent as well as 
experience. Senior co-captains, Chris Van 
Dervelde and Paul Buckley proved to be 
key players throughout the year. Talented 
sophomore, Bob Doherty lent a hand in the 
team's success as did junior, Shawn Hester. 
Tom Martin and Fordie Pitts came up with 
.solid performances. Overall, the '85-'86 
squad had the potential to fare well in 
tourney play. 

Early wins over Bentley and MIT served 
as confidence-builders for Boston College. 
At the Hawk Classic in Hartford, B.C. 
placed seventh, followed by a sixteeth place 
finish at the West Point Invitational. The 
Eagles were somewhat disappointed in 
their showing at the New England Champ- 
ionships. The team finished in the 
fourteenth spot, down from the fifth place 
captured by the previous year's .squad. 
Martin was the top player for B.C., 
followed closel\^rfiits and Hester. Senior, 



Paul Buckley led Boston College to a tliiifl 
place finish in the liig East. The Eagles 
notched a fourth in the qualifying rouiul of 
the ECAC tournament. Unfortunately, 
only the lop three teams were chosen lor 
the next round and the learn had to sit this 
one out, missing a < han( e at the < hampion- 
ship by five strokes. Boston College was 
represented in the .singles round, tlujugh, 
as Van Dervelde placed among the lop ten 
in Pennsylvania, thus (|ualifying for 
champion.ship competition. 

Although often overshadowed by big- 
lime S{)orts, the B.C. golf team managed 
once again to add to Eagle pride. Despite 
his team's failure to qualify for tlie ECAC 
tourney. Coach (Carroll was "satisfied" with 
his players' performance. The 'H.'j-'SB year 
was a solid one for the Eagles, with con- 
sistent play by individual golfers. As a team 
sport, golf enabled individuals to work 
together as a team, as well as gain recogni- 
tion for their own accomplishments. Once 
again, the B.C. squad came up with a fine 
season. 

C. Foley 




112 Jntramurals 








Build those biceps (left page); Shaping up for Spring 
Break (top); The fast moving sport of racquetball 
(left); All alone to score two (above) 



Intramurals 113 



Competing For the Fun of It 



"Grandpa... Grandpa..." 

"ZZZZ...Uh...uh, hiya Johnny. What can 
I do for you boys?" 

"Grandpa, my friend Bobby doesn't 
believe that sports were once a lotta fun. 
Tell him Grandpa. Tell him that things 
weren't always serious and competitive like 
they are now. Tell him that things have 
changed !" 

"What Johnny said was all true, Bobby." 

"But I don't understand, sir. How could 
sports be fun?" 

"Well, Bobby, they were. Let me tell you 
what I told Johnny about my school days at 
Boston College, over sixty years ago... back 
in 1986, when I was a senior." 



"1986!. ..Wow, you're ancient!" 

"Yep, it was a long time ago. Time's sure 
have changed. There's no such thing as 
what we used to call 'intramurals,' anymore. 
That's what sports should be all about... a 
little bit of competition, a little bit of skill, 
and a whole lot of fun. All that Divison I 
stuff was nonsense. When it came to sports 
back then, intramurals were the be all and 
end all." 

"Wow..." 

"We had all kinds of intramural sports 
back in 1986. In the fall, there was a touch 
football league with over 900 students and 
60 teams. It was the biggest turnout for 
football ever at B.C. The championship 



game was a dandy. The 'Oudaws,' a feisty 
team, whumped JVM.'" 

"And it was really fun?" 

"Yeah. ..and there was also co-ed 
Softball. 'Beef and Buns' won the champion- 
ship over fifteen other teams. In the men's 
Softball league, the 'Homeboys' were the 
champions. Oh, but these weren't the only 
sports. There were lots of different ones. 
There was women's volleyball. Let's see, the 
'Hurricanes' won that. There was men's 
tennis, which was probably the most 
competitive. Mark Dutil won that. The 
women's champ was Marijke Vandeven. 
Then there was racquetball, which was real 
tough. If 1 recall correctly, Lisette Martinez 



i^mm'^'i'mii^**'''!'''*'^^'^^!'' 




INTRAMURALS 



■/ a A n\ 




PlH 







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il loiirii.MiK III 

I I Ml? 



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114 



'imuraLs 



•J 



and Al Diamond were (lie winners. Heci<., I 
even remember Jose Periera hooting a ball 
40 yards lo win ihe Held goal ki( king ton- 
test." 

"There were that many dillerenl 
sports?" 

"My boy, that was just in the lall. Geez, 
there were even more in the winter and spr- 
ing. Co-ed volleyball, soccer, more tennis 
and racqiietball, and a spring Softball 
tournament — the biggest and most 
popular was basketball. There were about 
900 students and 100 teams split into two 
divisions — college and pro. In the end, 
only 24 college team, 8 pro, and 8 women's 
teams made the playoffs, so your team had 



to be good to make it. The championship 
games were even played al Robert's 
(Center." 

"(Jeez. Who was in charge ol all this? 

"Well, John Kane was the director oi in- 
tramurals and Steve Barrett was the 
student director. They did a fantastic job. 
The B.C. Athletic Association gave them 
about 42,000 dollars — about the cost of a 
semester's tuition now-a-days — and then 
the students provided the rest of the money 
by paying an entry fee for the team." 

"Were there any prizes?" 

"Well, aside from a nice mug, I guess I'd 
have to say that the biggest prize was the 
fun." 






Ann Cogavin 



Intramural Sports (left page); Dribbling down the court (above). 



Intramurals 115 



Falling Short Of The Goal 



Heading into Gary Williams' fourth 
season, the line on the team's forecast had 
been the same as it had been when Williams 
first came to the Heights: no respect, and 
consequently, no expectations. The team 
had no prognosis; it was picked to finish 
sixth in the conference. And, with that pick, 
it showed again that the prognosticators 
had seemingly forgotten where the Eagles 
had come from — that last year B.C. had 
reached the Final Sixteen for the fourth 
time in five seasons and that they had come 
within a shoelace of reaching the Final 
Four. Speculation and doubt were the 
responses the Boston College Eagles had 
grown used to, however. And they had 
made it an annual goal to prove that 
prognosticators were not always precise. 

Except when it came to this season. 

Before the season began and decisions 
were made, Williams had some decisions of 
his own to make, namely, where he would 
be coaching. It became a tradition for Gary 
Williams' name to come up whenever there 
was a coaching vacancy, and this offseason 
was no different. 

Arkansas called when Eddie Sutton left 

the school for Kentucky and Williams told 

them, "No, thank you." However, when 

Carl Tacy quit his coaching job at Wake 

Forest, Williams had a tough choice to 

make... Wake Forest was in the ACC and, 

before the Big East had been started, it was 

no secret that Williams, a Maryland^ 

. . " 

alumnus, dreamed of coaching in the == 

league. However, on July 24, the decision , 

had been made, a sigh of relief from Eagles^ 

fans was breathed, and preparations for the 

season began. 

But it was not long before the team fell 
into more misfortune. During early June, 
longtime assistant coach, Frank Power, 
passed away unexpectantly. It was a heavy 
loss for the team and for the basketball 
community. 

On top of this, the Eagles lost their start- 
ing center, Trevor Gordon, who was ruled 
academically ineligible by the school. 
Gordon would be forced to sit out the first 
six games of the season. To fill in, junior, 
Troy Bowers, jumped center while sopho- 
more, Skip Barry (6.5 ppg) occupied one 
forward spot. Bowers had played in a 
reserve role during his sophomore season 
and, although he was not a polished player 
during that campaign, he continued to 
show flashes of brilliance. As a freshman, 
Barry had stepped in the shoes of Murphy 
as the team's shooting big man, and had 
come through admirably. He was named to 
the All-Freshman team. 



Sophomore, Jamie Benton, reported to 
camp twt.ity pounds lighter and with a 
deadly outside shot. With the departure of 
Primus and Adams, the role of Benton as a 
backup loomed unavoidably in the back- 
ground. Benton had raised his stock during 
his freshman year and in the NCAAs. 

Senior speed demon, Dominic Pressley, 
returned to the offguard spot with an 
offseason spent on perfecting his skills, 
under his belt. Given his natural athletic 
ability, and the fact that Adams handled the 
ball, Pressley never had to work at ballhan- 
dling. But, with the inexperienced Barros 
at the helm, such a step became necessary. 

Although he was just a freshman, Dana 
Barros would have to fulfill the job of point- 
guard and be the general on the floor. 




While Barros was at Xaverian Brothers 
High, he had not done a lot of ballhandling. 
It would be quite an adjustment for the 
rookie from Mattapan, starting for a Big 
East contender and running its ballclub. 

Williams had brought in other key 
freshmen as well. Seven foot Englishman, 
Gary Cole, who had been playing organized 
ball for only four years, was given a medical 
redshirt due to a foot injury. Given the 
youth of the team, Steve Benton, the 6-5 
swingman from Philadelphia, averaged 
21.3 ppg and 10.3 rebounds would be 
looked to for contribution. Also, playing 
reserve roles were 6-7 forward Tom Hjerpe 
(15 ppg, 11.2 rebounds in high school), 
Kelly Monroe (24.2 ppg, 13 rpg), and 
seniors Ted Kelley. and Mike Sinicki. 

But perhaps the returnee with the most 
attention, as well as expectations, cast upon 
him was senior forward Roger McC^ready. 
The 6-5 McCready was coming off a bril- 



liant junior campaign where he averaged 
14.8 points and 4.8 rebounds per game, all 
the while proving time and time again that 
he could play against front courts that were 
consistently three to four inches taller. 

The Eagles began their 1985-'86 
campaign much like any other season; they 
started out winning six straight, including a 
win over ACC rival. Wake Forest. Five foot 
three, Tyronne Bogues led a 14-2 run that 
turned a 47-36 B.C. lead into a 50-49 
Deacon lead with 9:42 left. But Barros hit 
two twenty footers to sandwich a pair of 
Mark Cline free throws and with 1:08 left. 
Jamie Benton converted a three point play 
into the game's final lead of the night which 
gave B.C. the win, 62-60. 

B.C. then went on to post wins over 
Rhode Island, Utica, and Holy Cross, all the 
while prepping for the Big East season. But 
not before two Christmas tournaments. 
After getting by Division II Valdosta St., 
95-70, who was in the tournament only be- 
cause Stetson cancelled during the 
summer, B.C. faced their first test of the 
young season when they met Sonny Smith 
and his Auburn Tigers in the finals of the 
Red Lobster Classic. However, the first test 
of the semester did not bode well for the 
Eagle grade point average as they fell be- 
hind by as many as 16 points in the second 
half. The closest the Eagles came was 82-79, 
but it was too little, too late. Auburn took 
the game, and the fitle, 89-85. 

Next up on the Christmas list was the 
Fiesta Bowl Classic in Tucson, Arizona. A 
Barros 18 foot jumper with 0:07 remaining 
and Roger McCready's 22 points put the 
Eagles in the finals to play Arizona. But for 
the first time all season, the Eagles simply 
failed to show up. B.C. left in the first half 
and went into the locker room down by 15, 
39-24. 

The Eagles entered the Big East schedule 
at 9-2. The Carrier Dome would be the first 
stop. After forging to a five point lead (31- 
26) at halfdme, the Eagles went through a 
scoring drought that lasted ten minutes in 
which B.C. would not register a field goal, 
enabling Syracuse to win it going away, 68- 
52. 

Troy Bowers showed just why he was in 
the starting lineup when he came up with 
two critical free throws in the final 30 
seconds, in the process icing the game, for a 
61-60 victory over Connecticut. Late in the 
game. Bowers rejected shots of Earl Kelley 
and Phil Gamble and the Eagles first Big | 
East victory was the result. 

Perhaps the highlight of the season 
happened one January evening when 



116 Men's Basketball 




Hoxin); each other out (left page); Russ Dougherty 
playN tough defense (left). 



Walter Berry and the St. John Redmen 
visited the Boston Garden only to come out 
losers, in overtime, 79-77. With 0:06 left, 
Dana Barros hit two free throws to ice the 
game. Roger McCready had a game high 29 
points (17 in the second half). 

At this point the Eagles were doing what 
Eagles do best, flying, and flying high. 
They were challenging for a piece of first 
place and had knocked off one of last year's 
Final Four teams. But a visit to Storrs Field 
House changed all that as Connecticut 
avenged their one point loss suffered at 
Roberts Center with a convincing 80-69 
win. Observed Williams: "We didn't do a 
good job coming down after the St. John's 
game. We forgot why we were good in that 
game." 

They came, and they came in droves to 
Roberts Center. Providence fans. Loud 



Providence fans. And they went home 
happy because, with time expiring in 
overtime, Billy Donovan managed to 
finagle a rim aided foul line jumper that 
gave the Friars their first Big East victory, 
76-75. After the Eagles squandered a 36-26 
lead, Donovan was fouled by Barros with 
four seconds left and was going to the line 
with his team down by one point. But he 
could only manage one free throw which 
tied the game and set up his heroics in 
overtime. 

At the Boston Garden in front of a 
nationwide television audience, the Eagles 
regrouped and beat Ohio State, 87-74, 
largely in part to a 29 point effort from 
McCready. Another highlight of the game 
was the emergence of freshman swingman, 
Steve Benton, who shined with 14 points. 

B.C. needed a win against Pitt to even the 



(onlerence ic(oi(l biii Charles Siniili 
had something else in mind, as the 
Panthers, behind a 20 point effort 
f iom the sensational so|}lioiiiore, look 
a 64-62 decision at Fitzgerald Field 
House in a game that went down to 
the wire. Dtjminic Pressicy led the way 
for the Eagles with 16 points, .seven 
rebounds, and five assists. Barros got 
the Eagles to within two at 60-.58 with 
\:3() left. But a baseline jumper by 
Curtis Aiken and two Darryl Shepard 
free throws down the stretch put the 
game out of reach. 

The Eagles were struggling as they 
headed back to the Garden for a 
Saturday night home contest against 
Georgetown. B.C. would get the lead 
up to twelve and the Garden was rock- 
ing. But as with the rest of the year, 
the Eagles had the problem of putting 
teams away. Georgetown came back to 
win, 73-66. 

The Eagles hosted Syracuse at the 
Garden and were manhandled 80-55. 
It was a night when nothing would go 
right. The Eagles were down 38-28 at 
the half and came to within five at 39- 
34 but that was the closest they would 
come. Syracuse mounted a 12-2 run 
that ended any hopes of winning the 
game for B.C. 

The team found some solace in 
staging a come from behind victory 
over Seton Hall at Roberts Center but 
would lose the next three. The season 
was winding to a close and it was 
apparent that B.C. would not qualify 
for the NCAA tournament on their 
record alone. Neither would they 
receive the automatic bid into the tourna- 
ment by winning the Big East. The season 
was complete. Gary Williams and his 
Boston College Eagles accordingly called it 
a day. And, as it turns out, this would be the 
last time for Coach WilUams to hang up his 
sneakers in the B.C. locker room. In March 
of 1986, this coach of four consecutive 
years, was offered a position as Head Coach 
at Ohio State, that he could not refuse. 

So, the year ended with a lot of loss. Not 
only did the Boston College Eagles lose 
many a game. They also lost a coach who, 
for the past four seasons, had aided in 
forming them into a competitive and active 
sporting unit. 

Sea7i Hennessey 



Men's Basketball 117 




118 Men s Basketball 



Trying for two more (lefl paf;c — left); Point guard, Dana Barros, 
shfMjtinf; from outside (left pajje — right); Signaling for the ball (left); 
Waiting for the ball in anticipation (below); Uriving towards the basket 
(bottom). 




Men's Basketball 119 




120 Men's Basketball 





WEAN 



f%m i*^^ ^^ 




Gary Williams gives his team encouragement during 
a time out (left page — top); Troy Bowers attempts to 
go up and over (bottom); Bowers leaps above his 
competition (left). 



Men's Basketball 121 




122 Men's Basketball 




Troy Bowers demonstrates the art of slamming the ball (left page); 
Trying to out-rebound Villanova (top); Making an easy layup (left); A 
perfect shot (above). 



Men's Basketball 123 



The Eagles box in their opponent (right); A moment 
of concentration (right page — top); Where is the 
ball? (bottom) 



124 Men's Basketball 





Andy Ryan 
Men's Basketball 125 



Life in 

the 
Big East 

Intensity was the key to this year's Boston 
College Women's Basketball Team. Accor- 
ding to coach Margo Plotzke, this was the 
important factor for the 1985-86 season. 
Coming off a 19-9 season and a third place 
finish in the Big East, the Lady Eagles 
hoped to surpass these noteworthy 
achievements. 

The Eagles had many returners for this 
year's squad. Senior captain, Marie Grant 
proved once again that she was a vital 
member of the team. She was the leading 
scorer again for the Lady Eagles and was 
also top ten in scoring and top five in 
rebounds for the Big East. Junior center 
Kathleen Sweet (6'3") was also one of the 
top ten scorers in the Big East. The 5 '7" 
point guard had another fine season. Other 
members of the squad included senior, 
Sally Madeira and junior, Pam Thornton, a 
specialist at the foul hue. The 1985-86 
squad abounded with freshmen forwards. 
Susanne Maher was a Boston Globe and 
Boston Herald All-Scholastic. Great things 
were expected of her and her classmates, 
Leslie Bjerstedt and Bridget Cody. 

By mid-season, the lady hoopsters were 
9-6. The Eagles suffered losses against 
Villanova, Providence and Syracuse (a 
tough loss according to assistant coach, Ali 
Kanter). Big wins came against 
Georgetown and Pittsburgh. O'Day's 18- 
point performance sparked BC to an 
overtime victory over UConn. The Lady 
Eagles won by substantial margins over 
UNH (65-46), Drexel University (92-54), 
and Harvard (91-51). The team also partici- 
pated in the North Carolina State Christ- 
mas Classic, beating Louisville but losing a 
tough battle to Kansas. In this tournament. 
Grant was voted All-Tourney. Another 
tournament took place at Northwestern 
University and the season was topped off 
with the Big East Tourney being hosted by 
the Eagles at Robert's Center. 

C. Foley 




126 Women's Basketball 



W 




U It 




/ 





Shooting over the competition (left page); Eagles win the tap (top); Hop- 
ing to make an important shot (above); Defending the basketball (left). 



Women's Basketball 127 



Kings of the 
Mountains 



For those with the time, talent, and free 
weekends, the Ski team was the club to join. 
Loving to ski was of course a major pre- 
requiste for membership since dedication 
was the definite key to the team's success. 
Those on the team had to love the pain 
which coincided with the thrill and glory of 
the sport. It was not easy. Travel and sacra- 
fice were involved. But, to those who parti- 
cipated, there were no regrets. And for 
those outstanding members who placed in 
various events, there were only praises for 
the excellent leaders of the team. 

"Both the men's and women's teams 
hope to continue to represent B.C. in the 
National Championships," stated enthusi- 
astic skiing coach, Bill Toof, as the season 
was just beginning. He had good reasons 
for these high expectations. For the past six 
years, the Boston College Skiers had 
travelled to the championships, displaying 
their incredible skill on the slopes. And, 
with the return of Ail-American senior, 
Amy Glackin from time spent abroad in her 



Junior Year, the odds looked very promis- 
ing. 

Glackin, who placed first in lady's slalom 
early in the season, captained the women's 
team while Mike Leider led the men's team 
as captain. Placing 8th, in the 1984-'85 
season, the women's team seemed stronger 
than ever before. The men also promised to 
represent B.C. well, being last year's giant 
slalom champions and runners-up in 
Alpine skiing. George Abdow, last year's 
conference Champion, started off the 
1985-'86 season with a blast, winning the 
first two races of the year. His success 
proved an inspiration to other Boston 
College skiers. 

Coach Toof, as well as the members of 
the team, felt that, led by such excellent 
athletes as Abdow and Glackin, the skiers 
could not go wrong. Victories were 
definitely forecasted for the team. The fu- 
ture also promised an expected and well- 
earned participation in the Nationals. 





128 Skung 




Skiing 129 



Sprinting to New Heights 



"This could be the best track team ever at 
B.C." These were the words spoken by 
Coach Jack McDonald in early December. 
Time would tell whether or not McDonald's 
words were true. The Men's Indoor Track 
team did their best to prove their mentor 
correct. 1985-'86 was for them a great 
season. 

There were many stars on this talented 
team, each of them performing well in their 
own event throughout the season in both 
dual meets and championships. Senior Jim 
Kenny qualified for the NCAA Champion- 
ships with an amazing toss in the 35-pound 
weight throw. He also bettered his own 
record during the Dartmouth Relays. 

Juniors played big roles in the B.C.'s 



success this year. Ray Hawkins, a long 
jumper and sprinter, had an impressive 
season. He was an inch shy of the school 
record in the long jump at a meet against 
Harvard University. However, his jump 
was enough to cop him first place against 
the Crimson. It also qualified him for the 
NCAA tourney. His accomplishments did 
not stop there. He also qualified for the 
New England's in the triple jump and the 
controversial 55m dash. Another junior, 
Jim Maniscalco, dominated the high jump 
event. Apart from owning part of the 
school record for outdoor, Jim also quali- 
fied for New England and NCAA's with his 
first place performance of 6'9" against 
Harvard. 



Although it counted as a loss, B.C.'s one 
point defeat at the hands of Harvard was 
obviously a helpful one. Many champion- 
ship qualifiers emerged from this meet. 
There were other strong performances as 
well, such as the Eagles' sweep of the 1500. 
Junior Chris Blanchet was the first to cross 
the finish line, followed by second place 
finishes by sophomore, David O'Connell 
and freshman, George Grant. The tri- 
umvirate did well in other events also. 
Blanchet placed first in the 1000m and 
Grant and O'Connell finished 1-2 in the 
800. 

C. Foley 




Geoff Why 
Crossing the flnish line (above); Attempting to break away from the pack (right); 
Rounding the comer to the finish (right page). 




C^ c* 



m 




' -i&rfytttmtm 



130 Men's Track 




Geoff Why 



Men's Track 131 




Wi W W M WtjWiWBW WU^ 



f 



«>^ 




GeolT Win- 



Clearing a new height (above); Eagles leading the 
race — once again no competition in sight (right); 
Making a good hand off (right page). 





132 Women's Track 




On The 

Right 

Track 



With llic crack ol llic llrst starling gun, 
the B.C. Eagles progressed toward national 
prominence in the competitive field of 
Women's Track and Fic-lfl. This year, coach 
Jack McDonald's squad consisted of both 
seasoned experts and young hopefuls who 
dominated their first competition by 
tallying three second first place finishes and 
two first place finishes in the Greater 
Boston Collegiate Championships, held in 
early January. 

This year's standouts included transfer 
Allison Quelch in the 3000 meter run, 
Theresa Douchette in the 880 run, Janice 
Reid in the 400 meter run, Peggy Perkins in 
the 400 meter run, Joanne McDevitt in the 
triple jump, and finally, the Big East cross- 
country champ, Michelle Hallet in the 
women's mile. 

Included in the schedule for the 1985-'86 
season were the Millrose Games in New 
York City at Madison Square Garden in 
February, the Big East Championships at 
Syracuse University, and the New England 
Championships held on the home turf of 
the William J. Flynn Recreational Complex, 
here at Boston College. 

The culmination of the season was held 
in Oklahoma, at the NCAA Champion- 
ships, where Boston College proved its 
ability to handle a first-rate competition 
level with their team of experts. 

Andrea Flanagan 



Women's Track 133 




134 Men's Swimming 



Another race begins (left page); An inward tuck 
(right page). 





"^4 




^^ 



Steve Fil/patrick 



Season in the Sun 



The Men's Swimming Team had the ex- 
perience and depth to complete another 
fine season at the Heights. Many of this 
year's swimmers were returners from last 
year's squad, and Coach Tom Groden was 
back to guide B.C. through a tough season. 

Captain of this year's squad was senior, 
Kevin Kenny. An important cog in the 400- 
freestyle relay, Kenny also swam the free- 
style leg of the 400 medley relay. Other 
members of the freestyle relay team were 
juniors, Roberto Ayala and Scott Williams, 
along with sophomore, Greg Greene. Parti- 
cipating in the 400-medley team were 
Kenny, juniors. Dean Schneble (breast- 
stroke) and Jon Blood (backstroke), and 
freshman, Jim Sieve (butterfly). Eric Walter 
and Geoff Geis were two other senior 
members. 

Boston College competed against many 
teams from around New England. 
Opponents included Southeastern 



Massachusetts and UNH. Tough meets in- 
cluded Providence and Babson. The Eagles 
lost to UMass in a hard-fought battle in 
which many B.C. swimmers shone. Taking 
firsts were Ayala in the 100-freestyle and 
Schneble in the 200-breaststroke. Diver. 
Geoff Geis also took a first in this meet. The 
Eagles beat URI in the early part of the 
season where Greene smashed the Boston 
College record in the 1000 yard freestyle. It 
was up to the 400 freestyle relay team to 
clinch B.C.'s victory. 

A highlight of the season occurred 
during Christmas vacation when, leaving 
their coats and gloves behind, the B.C. 
swimmers travelled to Puerto Rico for a 
series of tournaments. After such a tremen- 
dous start to a successful season, the Eagles 
enjoyed this chance to get some R&R in the 
sun while also working out. 

C. Foley 



Men's Swimming 135 



Perfecting her diving techniques (top); A breath of relief after completing the 400 free 
(bottom); Eagles always "outstroking" their competition (right page). 




136 Women's Swimming 




Geoff Why 



Winning Strokes 



The Boston College Women's Swim 
Team was an enthusiastic and talented one. 
Although the team had lost many key 
swimmers to graduation, this year's Lady 
Eagles proved to be just as skilled. 

Tom Groden was the coach for the 
women swimmers as well as the men. Very 
popular with his team, Coach Groden led 
both squads to fine seasons. One area in 
which Groden hoped to find some help was 
the backstroke. Denise Callahan and Chris- 
tine Alola had been the top two in the 
backstroke in previous years, but they had 
since left the Heights and no new recruits 



replaced them. However, one event does 
not make an entire team. Compensating for 
the lack in the backstroke department were 
events such as the breaststroke. Junior, 
Tara McKenna was once again a great asset 
to the Eagle swimmers. In the freestyle, 
Sheila Malloy, a senior from Fall River, 
proved to be outstanding. Sophomore, 
Linda Gailius led the divers, a source of 
strength at B.C. 

The opening meet of the season was a 
very successful venture. The Lady Eagles 
literally blew UNH out of the water with a 
91-49 victory. The Wildcats were a team 



which was expected to present a challenge 
for Boston College. Instead, B.C. 
swimmers won in ten different events. 
Twelve Boston College records fell that 
day, which was the 100-yard breaststroke, 
set by McKenna. Another impressive 
victory came against such teams as UMass 
and Providence. All in all, 1985-'86 proved 
to be a very fruitful season and a precursor 
of things to come. 

C. Foley 



Wo7nen's Swimming 137 



Eagles Top Hockey East 



After a lackluster fall football season, 
people at the Heights were looking forward 
to winter, and with good reason. The 1985- 
'86 B.C. Men's Hockey team provided 
cause for excitement. The Eagles were 
hungry for a championship, as were their 
fans. After making it to the Final Four in 
Detroit last year, this season's squad 
responded with another successful 
campaign. With many of his starters retur- 
ning, Len Ceglarski looked forward to 
coaching his eleventh winter at B.C. 

Although Boston College lost some 
talent, the three top scorers from the 1984- 
'85 season returned. Senior captain, Scott 
Harlow, led the triumvirate of goal scorers, 
finishing second scorer in Hockey East. 



Fellow captain, Doug Brown, along with 
senior, Bob Sweeney, shared second team 
honors with Harlow on the All-Hockey East 
squad as well as finishing second and third 
respectively in team scoring. 

Offense was a big factor for the '84-'85 
squad, which totalled an incredible 240 
goals. With these three outstanding players 
returning, the Eagles were hoping to make 
the red light shine as many times as possible 
this year. Other forwards who contributed 
to this season's offense included, seniors, 
Neil Shea and John Orr, junior, Kevin 
Stevens, and sophomores, Dan Shea, Chris 
Stapelton, and John Devereaux. 

Good offense was not the only ingredient 
in the '85-'86 squad's success. The Eagles 



were just as adept at keeping the goals out 
of the net as they were at putting them in. 
Senior netminder, Scott Gordon, was 
responsible once again for B.C.'s great 
defensive performance. Coming off a 20-7- 
1 season with a GAA of 3.67, Gordon was a 
consistent performer between the pipes. 
Junior, Shawn Real and freshman, David 
Littman backed up Gordon on the ice. 

A core of alert defensemen helped ease 
the burden of the goalie. The 1984-85 
squad finished as the top defensive team in 
Hockey East, all owing to a mere 125 goals. 
From the onset of this season, the B.C. 
blueliners strove to maintain their stingy 
ways. Despite the loss of Dominic 
Campedelli to the NHL, the other 



Steve Fitz|),i(ru k 




members ol the (lelensivc iiiiil were l);i( k, 
keeping the puck oul ol iluir own viu\. 
Seniors, Joiin McNanun a and liol) Eniery 
were slaiwarls in I he li.Cl. end. Senior, 
Michael Barron and Junior, John McLean 
helped in the defensive eifbrts. Newcomers 
to the defense were fresiimen, David 
Buckley, Paul Marshall and Mike 
Mullowney. 

Sophomore sensation. Ken Hodge, was 
out for the first part of the season due to 
academic difficulties. The temporary loss 
of the 1984-'85 Hockey East Freshman of 
the Year did not hel|3 the team much, but 
Ceglarski used his four freshman forwards 
to fill the gap caused by Hodge's absence. 
Among the top recruits were Craig Janney, 
Rich Braccia, Shawn Kennedy and Tim 
Sweeney. 

This strategy seemed to work. B.C. was 
off to a great start, posting a 7-1 record in 
the early going. Their seventh victory was a 



special one. In Noveinlxr, I he F.agle 
|)ut khandlers beat that "oilier" school on 
the (irec-n Line, Boston University, in a 
closely-fought contest. What was particu- 
larly sweet about this win was that it 
ociui red in over-time, an area in which the 
1984-'85 squad often failed lo emerge 
victorious. Neil Shea copped this milestone 
for the Eagles, scoring the winning goal six 
minutes into overtime. 

Other wins came againsl Maine, 
Northeastern, UNH, and Providence. 
Boston College also blanked Holy Cross, 6- 
0. This game had cjuite a few highlights, in- 
cluding Freshman goalie, David Littman's 
shut out, four assists by Sophomore Dan 
Shea, and Ail-American Scott Harlow's 
second hat trick of the season. 

The only loss came at the hands of the 
WCHA's Wisconsin Badgers, 5-4. The 
Eagles came back to redeem themselves the 
following evening, topping the Badgers 6- 




,5. During liiis |jail of the season, B.C.'s 
defense was awesome, with the forwards 
helping out with their consistent back- 
checking. Cordon led the league in goal 
tending at this point, allowing only 2.20 
gfjals per game. Harlow was named Hockey 
EasiyCCM Player (jf the Week with 7 goals 
in () games for 16 points. 

lioston (>>llege then suffered two losses, 
both to Northern Michigan. The first game 
was a close one with NMU edging B.C. 4-3. 
The next night was not as close, although 
Harlow notched another hat trick. The 
usually stingy Eagles defense surrendered 
eight goals to come up on the short end of 
an 8-5 tally. Hockey East's fifth best team, 
Lowell, put up a hard battle against B.C. 
before losing 7-5. 

Bad luck continued to hover over 
McHugh as fifteen players were hit by the 
flu during the Denver series. The Eagles 
managed a 4-3 win the first night, sparked 
by a 36-save performance by net-minder 
Gordon. However, a worn-out B.C. squad 
lost badly the following evening, allowing 
nine pucks to enter the Boston College net. 

The second half of the season proved a 
bit kinder, although it took a little time for 
B.C. to get rolling. To open the second 
semester, Boston College played host to the 
Russian team, Sokol, which beat the Eagles, 
8-1. The team then suffered through losses 
to Providence and Minnesota. Towards the 
end of January, however, B.C. bounced 
back to take two games from Michigan 
Tech, 6-3 and 5-3, thus regaining first place 
in Hockey East standings. Harlow added 
another hat trick during this series, 
bringing him to a career total of 198 points, 
14 behind all-time leader, Joe Mullen, now 
with the Calgary Flames. 

Harlow and his linemate, fellow All- 
American, Doug Brown, continued to work 
well together This combination continued 
to be successful throughout B.C.'s tough 
schedule. An 8-5 loss to Northeastern the 
following week brought them to a 16-10-1 
record. They and the Huskies shared the 
top spot in Hockey East heading into 
February. Scott Gordon was then 13-8 with 
a goals-against average of 3.62. Rookie, 
Craig Janney played outstanding hockey, 
emerging as a legitimate rookie-of-the-year 
candidate. 

As for the Beanpot, the Eagles roared out 
to four quick goals in the first period 
against Cambridge rival. Harvard. Head- 
ing into the first intermission up 4-0, the 



Hodge attempts to score (left page); Paul Marshall 
follows the play up ice (right page). 

Men's Hockey 139 



Eagles had an air of confidence about the 
outcome of the game. Only two late third 
period goals by Harvard's Ail-American, 
Scott Fusco, cut the final margin in half, 4- 
2. 

B.C. met B.U. for the coveted silver 
trophy for the beans. Contrary to the 
previous week, B.U. came out smoking and 
took a 3-1 into the first intermission. 
Similar to the first round, that was all for 
the scoring until late in the game, except it 
was the winning team with the final tally. 
B.U. bested B.C. for the Beanpot 4-1 , so the 
Eagles turned ahead to the rest of the 
season. 

C. Foley 

Doug Brown chases a rebound (top); Bob Sweeney 
retrieves a lost puck (below); Dan Shea avoids the 
stick of Terry Tallifer (below right); Hodge's look 
of determination (right page). 



Steve Fitzpatrick 




W^k 



J 



% 



\ 



\ 



\ 




140 Men's Hockey 




Men's Hockey 141 




142 Men's Hockey 




Men's Hockey 143 




Steve Fitzpatrick 



Captain Scott Harlow stealing the puck (above); 
Harlow about to score (right); A little roughhousing 
(right page — top); Kevin Stevens makes an assist 
(middle); Ken Hodge breaks away (bottom). 



144 Men's Hockey 





Men's Hockey 145 




146 \\ (mien's Hockey 





Winners 
on Ice 



Kiitliusiasm. This was the main force be- 
liiiui the Women's Hotkey learn al Boston 
(College. Little notoriety and late-night 
practices did not seem to interfere with the 
team's energetic attitude. They faced each 
game with eagerness and maintained the 
( ohesiveness whici) made the team 
throughout the season. 

Coached by Tom O'Malley, the Lady 
Eagles managed a respectable showing for 
a club team which mainly competed against 
varsity squads. Experience was provided by 
co-captains, Kris Smith and Lisa Bonadies. 
Both were seniors and succeeded in leading 
their teammates through a very tough 
schedule. Other members included junior 
net-minder, Sue Hughey, fellow class- 
mates, Regan Tuerff and Kelly Keyes, and 
sophomore, Annie White. 

Being a club team, the Boston College 
Women's team lacked the support 
provided by other schools to varsity teams. 
However, the Lady Eagles strove to con- 
tinue the winning tradition of B.C. Against 
league heavyweights, Providence and 
Northeastern, the team came up with an 
admirable performance, holding each team 
to six goals-no small task for a club team 
against the top two varsity squads in the 
Women's Collegiate Ice Hockey Associ- 
ation. B.C. emerged victorious against 
cross-town rival, Boston University in OT, 
winning 4-3. 

Rounding out the season was the annual 
Beanpot Tournament. Like their male 
counterparts, the Lady Eagles skated 
against Northeastern, BU, and Harvard for 
the coveted Beanpot. 

C. Foley 



Women's Hockey 147 



Fast and Furious 




148 Walerpolo 



!$.(;. (;oalk- inakos a save (lelt page — lop); I'hc 1985-86 Boston 
College Waterpolo team (left page — bottom); A set-up for a shot 
(left); The Waterpolo team in action (below); An attempt to score 
(bottom) 








Geoff Why 



Waterpolo 149 



Scoreboard 



Football 4-8 


BC-OPP 


Brigham Young 

Temple 

Maryland 

at Pittsburgh 

Miami 


14-28 
28-25 
13-31 
29-22 
10-45 


at Rutgers 
at Army 
West Virginia 
at Cincinnati 


20-10 
14-45 
06-13 
17-24 


at Penn State 


12-16 


at Syracuse 


21-41 


Holy Cross 


38-07 



Men's Soccer 8-9-3 


BC-OPP 


at Connecticut 


0-1 


UNH 


o.t. 2-2 


at Maine 


0-1 


Syracuse 


0-2 


Stamford 


0-2 


at William and Mary 


o.t. 0-1 


at Old Dominion 


o.t. 1-2 


at Yale 


1-0 


at Harvard 


o.t. 0-0 


Providence 


1-0 


Brown 


o.t. 2-2 


Brigham Young 


1-0 


atURI 


0-1 


Merrimack 


2-1 


at UMass 


0-3 


at Northeastern 


1-0 


Vermont 


1-2 


St. Louis 


1-0 


Holy Cross 


2-1 


at B.U. 


1-0 



o.t. 



o.t 



-5 
-5 
-0 
■1 
-5 
-4 



Men's Hockey 26-11-3 BC-Opp 

at Maine 2-0 

Northeastern 5-2 

UNH 7-3 

Providence 5-1 

Wisconsin 

Wisconsin 

Holy Cross 

at B.U. 

Lowell 

at Northern Michigan 

at Northern Michigan 

at Harvard 

Denver 

Denver 

at Minnesota-Duluth 

at Minnesota-Duluth 

at UNH 

at North Dakota 

at North Dakota 

SOKOL-KIEV (USSR) 

at Colorado College 

at Colorado College o.t. 

at Providence 

Minnesota 

Minnesota 

at Lowell 

Michigan Tech 

Michigan Tech 

at Northeastern 

Harvard (Beanpot) 

UNH 

B.U. (Beanpot Final) 

at Providence 

Lowell 

B.U. 

Maine 5-3 

Maine 7-1 

at Northeastern 5-2 

at B.U. o.t. 3-3 



4- 

6- 

6- 

2- 

7- 

3- 

5-8 
.4-4 

4-3 

3-9 
1-10 

4-3 

8-4 

3-2 

3-4 

1-8 

8-2 
. 3-3 

1-4 

1-5 

8-4 

9-6 

6- 

5- 

5- 

4- 

5- 

1- 

5- 

3- 

7- 



-3 
-3 
-8 
-2 
-2 
-4 
-1 
-0 
-4 



Wrestling 4-11 


Result 


WNEC 


Lost 


Brown 


Lost 


Albany 


Lost 


Maine 


Won 


UMass-Boston 


Won 


Williams 


Won 


Plymouth State 


Lost 


WPI 


Lost 


Lowell 


Lost 


Amherst 


Won 


URI 


Lost 


Harvard 


Lost 


UPenn 


Lost 


Conn College 


Lost 


UNH 


Losi 



Field Hockey 


10-5-5 


BC-OPP 


James Madison 




2-0 


Northwestern 




1-3 


Yale 




2-0 


UMass 




0-2 


Purdue 




3-2 


William and Mary 


1-0 


B.U. 




2-2 


Brown 




2-0 


Rutgers 




2-0 


Providence 




1-1 


Springfield 




3-0 


Northeastern 




2-2 


Villanova 




4-1 


Temple 




0-2 


UConn 




1-3 


Harvard 




1-1 


UNH 




0-0 


Maine 




3-0 


Lock Haven 




1-0 


Northeastern 




0-2 



150 Scoreboard 



Women's B-ball 

at UNH 

at Drexel 

Harvard 

Alabama 

Bowling Green 

B.U. 

Hartford 

Kansas 

Louisville 

Villanova 

Georgetown 

at Providence 

at Pittsburgh 

UConn 

at Syracuse 

at St. Johns 

Seton Hall 

at Holy Cross 

at Villanova 

at Georgetown 

at Georgetown 

Providence 

Pittsburgh 

Conn College 

Syracuse 



12-10 



Women's Tennis 

UConn 
Dartmouth 
Brown 
B.U. 



4-0 



BC-OPP 

65-40 
92-54 
91-51 
69-78 
47-60 
64-59 
80-40 
59-68 
74-68 
61-67 
78-63 
71-87 
69-57 
62-55 
56-67 
59-55 
69-54 
68-75 
54-81 
53-81 
53-56 
71-77 
71-57 
59-55 
64-70 



BC-OPP 

8-1 
5-4 
6-3 
9-0 



Volleyball 11-27 BC-OPP 

Harvard 3-0 

Holy Cross 0-3 

at M.I.T 2-3 

Syracuse 1-3 

UConn 0-3 

Northeastern 0-3 

Providence 0-3 

Fairleigh-Dickinson 3-0 

Colgate 0-3 

Cornell 1-3 

Brown 1-3 

at Syracuse 0-3 

at Providence 0-3 

UConn 0-2 

UNH 2-0 

Vermont 2- 1 

St. Lawrence 2-0 

Queens College 2-0 

Holy Cross 1-2 

Brown 2-1 

Colgate 0-3 

Cornell 0-3 

UConn 1-3 

Rutgers 1-3 

Harvard , 2-1 

Colgate 1-2 

Bucknell 2-0 

Cornell 0-2 

Robert Morris 2-1 

Drexel 0-2 

Towson State 0-2 

Pittsburgh 0-3 

UConn 3-1 

Seton Hall 1-3 



Men's B-bali 13-15 


BC-OPP 


al Maine 


82-69 


UNH 


78-55 


at Wake F"orest 


62-60 


at URl 


76-58 


Utica 


93-66 


Holy Cross 


84-57 


Valdosta State* 


95-70 


Auburn* 


85-89 


Wisconsin** 


74-72 


Arizona** 


61-71 


at Syracuse 


52-68 


UConn 


61-60 


St. John's 


o.t. 79-77 


at UConn 


69-80 


Providence 


o.t. 75-76 


Ohio State 


87-74 


at Pittsburgn 


62-64 


Georgetown 


66-73 


Syracuse 


55-80 


Seton Hall 


76-65 


at Providence 


83-92 


Villanova 


57-67 


at St. John's 


75-87 


at Seton Hall 


74-85 


Pittsburgh 


71-68 


at Georgetown 


76-90 


at Villanova 


63-74 


Big East Tournament 




Syracuse 


79-102 


* = Red Lobster Classic, 


Orlando, 


Florida 




** = Fiesta Bowl Classic, 


Tucson, 


Arizona 





A special thanks to the Heights and 
Sports Publicity for all their help with 
the sports section of the 1986 
yearbook. 

Scores are complete through March 
12,1986. 



Scoreboard 151 



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Perspectives 



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156 Perspectives 




Spirit 

of 

America 



Perspectives 157 




158 Perspectives 



The Chamoions 




Swecliicss and (icorge. They say these 
two athletes finally received what was due 
them and had always seemed to elude 
them. Two potential Hall-of-Farners 
received the most coveted prize of all, a 
championship ring. 

Walter "Sweetness" Payton led his 
Chicago Bears to an expected Super Bowl 
triumph, while Third Baseman George 
Brett brought his Kansas City Royals from 
the underdog role into the forefront and a 
World Series title. 

The Bears led everyone in the NPL with 
an awe inspiring 15-1 record, and con- 
tinued their trek with playoff shutouts of 
the Giants and Rams. The culmination of 
the Bears Super Season was a Super rout of 
the New England Patriots 46-10 in the 
finale. 

Entering the playoffs, the Royals were 
not expected to fare well against the stingy 
Toronto Blue Jays. After overcoming their 
first obstacle, they battled the again favored 
St. Louis Cardinals. Seven games later, the 
Royals and Brett had become the World 
Series victors. 

As for the college football ranks, Barry 
Switzer's strictly disciplined Oklahoma 
Sooners battered undefeated Eastern In- 
dependent Penn State 26-10 to cop the 
mythical NCAA Division One football 
crown. 



Perspectives 159 




Tragedies in tine Air 



With technology always advancing, 
wouldn't it seem that safety would also be 
improving? But, things just didn't work 
that way in 1985. Whether it was faulty 
technology or just sheer accident, the year 
proved to be disastrous for air travel 
throughout the world. 

Five major air crashes resulted in 1,185 
lost lives, one of the worst years in the air 
ever. Headlining those crashes was the 
debacle in Japan which cost 520 lives, the 
worst air tragedy ever. 

In America, on August 2, 1985, a Delta 
L- 1 1 1 crashed in Dallas killing 1 34 people. 



It was another disaster which became a part 
of reality in 1985. 

Aside from mechanical malfunctions, air 
travel had its problems in the form of ter- 
rorists. A TWA plane in Athens, Greece 
was overcome by Sheite terrorists and the 
163 people lived in panic as the hijackers 
took the plane to Beirut, Algeria and then 
back to Beirut again. One American was 
killed in the transition. 

What happened to air travel in 1985? 
What will happen in the future? Hopefully, 
the conditions will improve. 



^«4^£[^\ 




160 Perspectives 



'.^■' 






Perspectives 161 




162 Perspectives 



Head liners 




Clockwise from left: 

Mick Jagger joins Tina Turner at 

the Live-Aid concert; Miami Vice 

Heartthrobs Don Johnson and 

Phillip Michael Thomas; Madonna 

captures the crowd; Rock Hudson; 

Whoopi Goldberg from "The Color 

Purple." 



Perspectives 163 






When we first came to B.C. four years 
ago, we were naive, away from home for the 
first time, and unsure of what to expect 
from university life. Even though we were 
the ones who had made the choice, Dina 
grumbled about the barbarity of being sent 
away to a cold dorm room. I remember 
being struck by the sound of the Gasson 
bell, which, at the time, was missing a note. 
It drove me crazy. Soon all the dust settled, 
however. Ma was gone and Dina and I were 
left with the excitement of Boston and a 
new life! 

In the next few weeks, we met all sorts of 
wonderful people and exalted in our choice 
of schools. Of course, there were surprises. 
Except for the Southington-ites up here, 
few seemed able to tell us apart. Sometimes 
the confusion was fun. 

The best thing about college was that you 
could do whatever you wanted, and revel in 
various harmless eccentricities. I smile 
when I think of us singing Makem & Clancy 
tunes in the shower. (Dorm bathrooms 
weren't like home, but the acoustics were 
great.) And then there were the puppets. 
I'm sure people chuckled at us clumsily 



dragging our wares from Newton Campus. 

At the same time, we were acutely sensi- 
tive to the problem of what to ultimately do 
with our lives. Though it remained unsaid, 
Dina and I were both certain something ex- 
citing lay on the horizon. An initial interest 
in languages (sparked by another South- 
ington B.C. grad, our beloved high school 
Italian "prof," Alphonse D'Angelo), led to 
further interests. At B.C., other great 
people sparked our enthusiasm for 
German as well. The most fascinating 
people study and teach languages — 
cosmopolites, marathon runners, opera 
singers. And the faith and support from 
these two departments helped us visualize 
futures in graduate school. 

This year we had the valuable experience 
of Scholar of the College Projects. Dina's 
work with Mark O'Connor in the Honors 
Program explored the idea of mission in 
Dante's Commedia, Goethe's Faust, and 
Dostoevsky's Brothers Karamazov. I, mean- 
while, jumped into German medieval 
courtly romances, specifically Tristan and 
Parzival, aided by Michael Resler in the 
German Department, whose enthusiasm 



and faith went a long way! 

Reflecting on these four years which 
have brought us to this stage in our 
personal and academic development, I 
naturally think of the family, friends, and 
mentors who have shaped our futures. 
What makes Dina and me different is 
what excites us in life: languages, puppets, 
and the people we love - Ma, Pa, friends. 
This is the bond which we have with 
everyone else who has left B.C., or any 
university. Everyone, looking back on four 
years, can point to particular individuals 
whose presence was magic. 

Leaving was very difficult. We found 
ourselves on the threshold of something 
new, as we had four short years ago. 
However, now we had valuable experiences 
(good and bad) behind us and within us. 

Ultimately B.C., like any experience in 
life, becomes what you make it. Friends are 
everywhere for the asking; life is there for 
the taking! 



■ Donna and Dina Consolini • 



164 Perspectives 




Perspectives 165 




166 Perspectives 




When looking back at my nursing educa- 
tion at Boston College, I realized why the 
program had such a good reputation. I had 
excellent faculty instruction in the class- 
room as well as in the clinical setting. The 
major teaching hospitals in the Boston area 
with which B.C. was affiliated, provided me 
with extensive and varied learning ex- 
periences. 

As a nursing student, I had to make sacri- 
fices. Getting up early in the morning, my 



fellow nurses and I would go to the hospital 
for clinical. There were also many occasions 
when I would be required to stay in on 
Thursday nights to do care plans or spend a 
considerable amount of time in the library. 
The curriculum demanded a tremendous 
amount of hardwork and dedication. 

Outside of the top notch nursing educa- 
tion and preparation that Boston College 
provided, I also enjoyed "the city" and all 
that it had to offer. The fact that I had 



always loved Boston even played an im- 
portant role in my decision to attend 
Boston College. The hard work, fun and 
lasting friendships were the three main 
characteristics of B.C. that truly made my 
college years worthwhile, memorable and 
thoroughly enjoyable. 



I Arine Pecevich • 



Perspectives 167 



I 




Although the academic standards, 
friendly atmosphere, and community life 
of Boston College were all instrumental in 
my choice of college, the location of the 
university was also a major consideration in 
my decision. A school with both an urban 
and suburban environment was my ideal. I 
wanted the opportunity to have both 
cultural and social experiences which only a 
city could provide. At the same time, 1 
wished to retain the hometown atmosphere 
I had left behind. 

I had many pre-conceived notions about 
"college life." However, it did not turn out 
as I expected. The road was not as smooth 
as it seemed. Now, when looking back, it 
does not surprise me that there were times 
during freshman year that I found myself 



down in the dumps and homesick. 

However, B.C. proved to become more 
and more enjoyable with each passing year. 
Friendships became more closely knit as 
our class unity grew. I became involved in a 
great amount of activities which made me 
feel a more a part of the college experience. 

Being an Education major, I found that 
class size was small and I had the good 
fortune to know my professors on a 
personal level. This type of learning situa- 
tion proved very positive. It enabled me to 
develop many friendships among class- 
mates as we walked through the corridors 
of Campion. We would struggle through 
"Teaching Social Studies" or "Philosophy 
of Ed" and then join for coffee and cookies 
in Sister Helene's and Sister Claire's office. 



The School of Education and its staff went 
out of their way to provide a friendly atmo- 
sphere for the students. 

People have asked me, many times, why I 
chose to become a teacher. The truth was 
that I had wanted to pursue education since 
my teenage years. The educational and 
professional experience I recieved from 
B.C. was rewarding. It deeply enhanced my 
interest in the teaching field. 

It was hard to leave Boston College. 
However, the knowledge that all the friend- 
ship and experience I gained at B.C. will 
travel with me into the future, made my loss 
a little easier. And just think. ..I got all this 
for a mere fifty thousand dollars! 



•Maria Daronco • 



168 Perspectives 




Perspectives 169 




170 Perspectives 



'P 



^ 



-a^jM 



Representing an International Student 
at Boston College, Demetri Pelidis came to 
America from Athens, Greece. Demetri 
was a twenty-two year old senior who 
majored in psychology and history and was 
looking toward a graduate degree in child 
psychology. However, this B.C. Greek's 
first and last love was soccer. Demetri 
aspired to play the sport professionally. 

An American friend travelling in Greece 
first introduced Demetri to B.C. Calling 
Boston the collegiate center of America, 
Demetri's friend encouraged him to apply. 
So, he did. He was accepted and came to 
B.C. for a trial run. It turned out that he 
loved it. "It's the best thing I've ever done!" 
admits Demetri. 

The main reason for leaving his 
homeland for America was so that Demetri 
could get a respectable education. "I had to 
do it to get my own personality," he 
admitted, "There is a different mentality in 
America. My way of thinking and doing 
things has changed for the better." 



"My English wasn't that great," said 
Demetri about his initial arrival in America. 
Also, he found adjusdng to the American 
culture and college life difficult at first: "I 
didn't even know what a syllabus was when 
I came here." 

Demetri had come a long way since his 
arrival, due in part to his success as a soccer 
player. He said that the U.S. played a much 
more physical, aggressive, and defensive 
game than the Europeans. Feeling that the 
Europeans played with more finesse and 
imagination, Demetri saw them as more 
skillful than Americans. 

In Boston, Demetri saw a city which was 
youthful, alive, and exciting. You would 
not often find Demetri in the Boston bars, 
for he preferred dining and dancing to 
slugging and staggering. Some of Demetri's 
favorite spots were Capuccino's on Beacon 
Street and The Metro in Beantown. 

Compared to Athens, Boston was much 
more structured around the university. 
Athens, a city of hustle and bustle, held a 



high concentration on industry. However, 
when it came to weather conditions, Boston 
was no comparison to the the sunny Greek 
peninsula. "Athens is bright almost 350 
days of each year," Demetri reminisced. 

Demetri felt that friendships and 
learning from the American culture were 
the major benefits of his B.C. experience. 
He enjoyed just living in America and the 
great collegiate spirit of Boston College. 
"The academics are highly competitive," he 
commented, "while this is also a social 
school." As for his differences with the 
university, Demetri stated, "Don't ask me 
about something I can find wrong with this 
place because I love it!" He found the Inter- 
national students were treated very well: 
"The International organizations do a 
great job; they are very helpful in every 
aspect." 



Keith Gnazzo 



Perspectives 171 






I was always, first and last, a Boston 
College student. I often had to remind 
myself and others of this as I progressed 
through these past four years. When I 
joined the Reserved Officer's Training 
Corps (ROTC) in my freshman year, I was 
not aware of the time committment I was 
making. Especially in my junior and senior 
years, ROTC meant alot of early mornings 
and exciting, but tiring, weekends. On the 
other hand, this military program enriched 
my college years immensely. I could not im- 
agine what my life, over the past four years, 
would have been like without it. 

ROTC gave me the opportunity to do, 
learn and experience things which many 
may never even dream of. While in ROTC, 
I took one military class per semester. 
These included such subjects as: Land 
Navigation, Military History, Small Unil 
Leadership (which was basically organiza- 
tional behavior). Small Unit Tactics, 
Military Law and, in the last semester of 
senior year, a transitional seminar entitled. 
From Cadet to Lieutenant. In my Tuesday 
and Thursday morning "Leadership Labs," 



I went from learning how to salute and 
other basic military skills, to commanding a 
battalion of cadets. The leadership training 
and experience which I received was im- 
measurable in terms of future value. 

Due to a continual influx of new and ex- 
citing subjects, ROTC was never boring. I 
was involved also in various "extra- 
curricular" activities for ROTC, such as, 
writing for the Cadet Battalion newspaper, 
and being a member of two different 
military organizations; one of these was a 
social and service-oriented organization 
while the other concentrated upon military 
tactics. 

The highlight of my ROTC experience, 
however, was the summer between my 
junior and senior years. At this time, I 
attended Advanced Camp and U.S. Army 
Airborne School at Fort Bragg, North 
Carolina. Advanced Camp was basically a 
six-week evaluation period. Cadets were 
questioned on virtually everything they had 
learned in their three previous years in 
ROTC. More importantly, leadership 
qualities and potential were evaluated. 



At Advanced Camp, I met ROTC cadets 
from the entire East coast — last year there 
were approximately 3700 cadets at Fort 
Bragg. Participants were given a leadership 
rating of between 1-5 (5 being much more 
than exceptional) and an overall rating of 1 - 
3700. 

After Advanced Camp, 1 went to U.S. 
Army Airborne School. At Airborne 
School, I spent two weeks learning how to 
safely jump out of airplanes. I then ex- 
ecuted five successful Airborne jumps. 

Overall, I really enjoyed ROTC at Boston 
College and looked forward to at least four 
years on active duty for the United States 
Army. Despite the early mornings and my 
busy schedule, I felt that I had the best of 
both worlds over the past four years. When 
I graduated in May, I not only became a 
graduate of one of the finest universities on 
the East coast, I also became a Second 
Lieutenant in the U.S. Army. 



' Carole Kane 



172 Perspectives 




Perspectives 173 




174 Perspectives 




Most students knew Peter Thomas as the 
President of the Undergraduate Govern- 
ment of Boston College. What most 
students did not realize, however, was that 
Peter had had a physical handicap since he 
was ten years old. On July 3, 1974, he and 
his family were driving in Canada when 
they were involved in an accident. Peter's 
younger brother was killed and he, himself, 
had to have both of his legs amputated 
from the knees down. He was then taken to 
the Craig Rehabilitation Hospital for three 
and a half months. There he was fitted for 
artificial legs and slowly learned to walk 
with them. 

Although it was a tragic ordeal, Peter's 
attitude remained positive, greatly due to 
the inspiration of the other patients. They 
all lacked self-pity; their attitudes were "It 
could have been worse." Each person saw 
someone who's misfortune was greater 
than his own and was then thankful. Peter 
was grateful that he wasn't paralyzed from 
the waist down. The person paralyzed from 
the waist down was thankful he wasn't 
paralyzed from the neck down. The person 
who was paralyzed from the neck down was 
grateful that he was not blind. Each realized 
that their own misfortune was mixed with 
blessings. 

Peter also received a great deal of 
support from his family and school friends. 



His walking gradually improved. Soon he 
was setting his sights on sports. Biking and 
swimming were great challenges. However, 
the sport in which he excelled was skiing. 
He began racing in the National Handicap 
Championships and came home with many 
medals. Active and competitive sports, 
especially skiing, gave Peter a new attitude 
which was reflected in his rising grades. He 
gained confidence in himself and realized 
that the loss of his legs did not mean limita- 
tions. He began to play up his strengths, be- 
coming interested in student government. 
He was elected president of his senior class. 
And here at Boston College, he obviously 
continued his activity in area. 

Peter felt that the greatest influence on 
his life was George DePontis, the president 
of a public relations firm in Miami, Florida. 
He was always interested in the rehabilita- 
tion of the physically handicapped and put 
out the National Handicap Championship 
Magazine, doing a feature story on Peter. 
DePontis counseled and encouraged Peter, 
helping him organize the Handicap 
Awareness Day at Boston College. 

Peter felt that Boston College made an 
effort to provide for those who were physi- 
cally handicapped. Ann Morgan was in 
charge of making sure that their needs 
were met. Peter says that most buildings 
and classrooms were accessible to the hand- 



icapped, some better than others. As for 
housing, most of the dorms, except the 
Mods, were equipped with handicap 
rooms. These rooms had larger doorways, 
bedrooms and bathrooms so that a wheel- 
chair could be easily manuevered within. 

Peter did feel some sense of pride when 
people were surprised by what he calls his 
"physical challenge," and he makes no 
attempt to hide it from anyone. As he put it, 
"Everyone has a handicap in some way, 
shape or form." Peter had three goals: to 
unify the handicapped students at Boston 
College, to educate the B.C. community 
about the physically challenged and to edu- 
cate society on the whole. Physically 
challenged people do not want sympathy, 
they want understanding. 

"Handicaps can be overcome. It is really a 
question of attitude. A positive attitude can 
turn a negative situation into an attribute. 
I'm not going to say that if I had it all to do 
again that I would chose to have two artifi- 
cial legs, but the positive aspects that have 
resulted from my physical challenge have 
far outweighed the negative aspects. It has 
definitely been a positive influence in my 
life." 



• Roberta Blaz 



Perspectives 1 75 






Playing two varsity sports. Can it be 
done? Or, better yet, can it be done 
successfully? The answer to both these 
questions is "yes," that is, if you are Doug 
Brown. A twenty-one year old senior from 
Southborough, Massachusetts, Doug was a 
prominent member of both the B.C. 
hockey and lacrosse teams. 

One wonders how such an active athlete 
could have had any time for academics. 
"My time is limited, but it has helped me 
organize my academics," admits Doug who 
was completing his major in history, "I find 
I have enough time for my academics." 
Looking into the future, Doug wished to 
pursue his life long dream of professional 
hockey as his career. 

Doug chose to attend Boston College be- 
cause, "It had a top-notch athletic program 
and it competed in the highest academic 
caliber to go along with its beautiful 
location." He does not regret his decision to 
become an Eagle and reach new heights. 
Although Doug saw the possibility "to 
compete at a high level athletically," a very 



important aspect of his B.C. experience, he 
also strove "to be a part of the classroom, 
part of the entire school environment." 

Most widely known at B.C. for his success 
in hockey, Doug's interest in lacrosse was 
overlooked considerably. "Hockey is a way 
of life and can be pursued professionally," 
says Doug, accounting for the emphasis 
placed upon his role as a hockey player. 
However, although often placing a more 
intense importance upon hockey, Brown 
did not neglect his other athletic interest, 
emphasizing, "I love lacrosse dearly." 

Doug openly admits that he had many 
fun years at Boston College. However, 
when asked what experience he saw as most 
memorable, he remarked, "I can't really 
single out one specific thing because I've 
enjoyed so much. But, athletically, reaching 
the NCAA Final Four has been a dream 
come true and just plain meeting people 
has been an enjoyable experience." Seeing 
"the repore between the students and the 
professors," as one of the strongest assests 
of the university, Doug stressed that the 



tremendous sense of community on 
campus had made his years complete. 

During his college years, this B.C. athlete 
also found time to venture into the city of 
Boston, the hub of New England. "Boston 
is a city of athletics, art and colleges," 
Brown commented, "It is the educational 
center of the United States." Doug did not 
not even stop to think when asked about his 
favorite spot within the city itself: "I like 
Faneuil Hall with its fine assortment of 
food!" 

Doug Brown thoroughly enjoyed his 
B.C. years and looked forward to his 
future, hopefully in the NHL. Asked if he 
had any advice for upcoming youngsters 
with athletic talent, Doug said, "Reach for 
the stars. ..push your athletics to the fullest. 
"But," he warned, "Keep other outlets 
open. Stress academics because your 
athletic career may not always work out." 



■ Keith Gnazzo • 



176 Perspectives 




Perspectives 177 




178 Perspectives 




Carlton Sauls, a twenty-two year old 
Sociology major interested in hospital 
administration, aspired toward attending 
graduate school. And the B.C. senior, who 
hailed from Washington, D.C., had the 
ambition and determination to accomplish 
his goal. These qualities were best ex- 
emplified by his success as a Boston College 
Resident Assistant for two of his four years 
in college. Carlton also took on the added 
job of Staff Assistant during his senior year, 
making Roncalli his B.C. home. The 
organization and evaluation of the College 
Road staff were Sauls' main duties as S.A. 

Taking his own definition of his role 
seriously, ("An R.A. is a multifaceted in- 
dividual who takes on many roles, such as 
student counselor, friend, listener."), 
Carlton tried hard to fulfill his obligations. 
His decision to continue as an R.A. in his 



senior year was based upon the good ex- 
periences and challenges it had provided 
during his junior year. Being a Staff Assis- 
tant also proved a brand new adventure. 

The job of Resident Assistant was looked 
upon with pride by Carlton: "I am very 
lucky to experience the University and be 
such an active part of it." There were, 
however, drawbacks to the position. 
"Sometimes I wish I were living with my 
peers, but my friends are only a phone call 
away," Carlton emphasized when asked if 
he felt excluded from the "senior life." He 
also saw the continuous demands on his 
time as a minor drawback to being a 
Resident Assistant. 

Because he felt that a close interaction 
between students and resident assistants 
was not achieved when living on Lower 
Campus, Carlton chose to live in the 



College Road area. "I can have the privacy 
of my room or open the door and have fifty 
roommates," he quipped. 

Pertaining to the University as a whole, 
Carlton was overjoyed with his experience 
at Boston College. He had a strong sense of 
community at the school and also felt that 
there was a genuine concern on the part of 
the professors. "There is a good one-to-one 
relationship with the professors," Carlton 
said,"but it is up to you to make the first 
move." However, he also believed that all 
schools had their drawbacks, B.C. not ex- 
cluded. The only negative criticism Carlton 
had of Boston College, though, was its lack 
of racial integration; "The groups stick with 
their own." 



Keith Gnazzo 



Perspectives 179 



w^^ 

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"You don't have to be an expert to get out 
and do it!" This was the message which 
Woody Driggs wished to give. ..and it was 
such a fitting motto for Woody himself. 
During his four years at the university, he 
showed the entire Boston College commu- 
nity just what a little initiative can do. 

For Woody, the final choice of a college 
was simple. He reached his decision 
basically through the process of elimina- 
tion... B.C. was the only school that did not 
"wait list" him, so there was little else to say 
about the matter. 

The city of Boston was what initially 
attracted this young man to Boston College. 
Campus life and the campus community, 
although important, were only secondary 
considerations. Little did Woody know 
that, within his next four years, he would 
create an organization that would have a 
great impact upon this B.C. community. 

As a freshman, Woody saw a notice 
calling for musicians tojoin a folk group for 
the Newton Campus Liturgy. He had had 
very little musical training except for three 
months of trumpet in the fifth grade and a 
few guitar lessons. Organized religion was 
also not a great concern of Woody's; he had 
been brought up in a Catholic environment 
but did not attend church regularly. 

Through these folk group meetings. 
Woody met a university chaplain whom he 
considered one of his major inspirations — 
Laetitia Blain. While he was a freshman, 
Woody learned a great deal of liturgical 
music as he participated in the folk mass 
and sang in the St. Ignatius choir. As a 
sophomore, he ran the folk group at the 
masses on Upper Campus. Prom his junior 
to senior year, he ran the 1 p.m. folk Mass, 
on Sunday nights, in St. Ignatius Church. 

180 Perspectives 



During this time, the enthusiasm, spirit and 
participation of the student community in- 
creased steadily. 

Up until the day of graduation, Woody 
could not read sheet music. However, this 
did not stop him from creating The Liturgy 
Arts Group, established principally for the 
organization of Masses on the B.C. campus. 
He created it not only to serve the commu- 
nity, but also so members could "help 
themselves while helping others." 

One of Woody's major goals was to unify 
the spiritual community at B.C. In order to 
accomplish this, he aimed at various 
problems which the group had sited at 
Boston College liturgies. For example, the 
lack of liturgy planning between priest, 
student leaders and chaplains was noted 
and planning committees were established 
to help communications between all in- 
volved. 

Woody said that the major stopping 
block to the unification of B.C.'s spiritual 
community was the lack of a central chapel. 
There was nowhere to foster the enthu- 
siasm and talent of those who were willing 
to share their gifts with the community. 
The barriers between Newton, Upper and 
Lower campuses had to be eliminated. So 
that all of the resourses available to the 
community could be pooled and taken 
advantage of effectively. Woody felt that 
this geographic separation of students was 
a detriment to B.C.; it was an issue which 
Woody believed the university should have 
addressed as a whole. 

The Liturgy Arts Group was at times a 48 
hour per week job for Woody. Because of 
its Catholic foundation, he saw its potential 
as one of the most infiuential groups at B.C. 
He joked that "The Sunday liturgy was the 



most well attended event on campus." 

By founding this organization. Woody 
felt that he had accomplished what he 
wished during his senior year; he had 
organized a group which addressed major 
spiritual concerns on the campus. When 
one considered Woody's potential, it was no 
surprise that he had achieved what he 
wanted, successfully. 

As Woody ended his four years at B.C., 
he realized that there were two major 
pressures which drove his college ex- 
perience: grades and leadership. It was the 
equilibrium of these two forces that he 
struggled to maintain. 

In his freshman year, Woody, who hailed 
from Vernon, Connecticut, felt compelled 
to pursue medicine. After travelling several 
paths, he finally decided to pursue a 
computer science degree, though he had 
had no previous experience with 
computers before coming to B.C. And, 
even with schoolwork and the Liturgy Arts 
Group, Woody still found time for a part- 
time job at the Computer Center. 

No one could say that Woody Driggs was 
not a doer. Although he was not an expert 
in the activities which he became involved, 
he had the natural capacity to grasp the 
basic concerns and needs of the community 
and the natural resolve to take action. 
Woody did not sit back and let the world 
take care of itself. Instead, he resolved to 
make a change. Although not an acclaimed 
musician. Woody could be hailed as one of 
the great composers of the 1 986 graduating 
class. His success was measured by the 
harmonious spirit he attempted to create 
within the community's environment. 



Kerstin Gnazzo > 




Perspectives 181 




182 Perspectives 




Dave Smith almost didn't work 
"Tiiursday Night at the Rat" for all his four 
years. Due to the rise in the drinking age, 
there was a question as to whether or not 
there would be a "Rat" this year. However, 
thanks to the support of Father Hanrahan, 
the tradition continued and Dave retained 
his job... and received a managerial position 
to boot. 

The Rat was originally set up for student 
to "drink, dance, eat pretzels and have 
fun." By most accounts, it lived up to that 
reputation. It was, by far, the most popular 
of the campus pubs, primarily due to the 
setting it provided. "You don't feel guilty 
about spilling beer on tile floors." 

The success of a Thursday night 
depended on the crowd and the DJs. A 
number of trends could be noticed at the 
pub, such as the major decrease in the 
crowd size at mid-term time or the increase 
of Rat dwellers during the second semester. 
Dave attributed these phenomena to the 
overall attitudes of the seniors, who made 



up the majority of the Thursday night 
crowd. During the second semester, they 
saw Thursdays as "one of the last times we 
can go to the Rat." 

Besides, the first Rat of the school year, 
the biggest turn-outs were the semester 
airbands. Dave, who usually served as the 
emcee, looked at this as "the Rat giving 
something back to it's patrons." It was not a 
profitable evening but the staff did not 
seem to care. It served its purpose. It 
provided good clean fun. 

Dave, a finance and computer science 
major from Long Island, saw his job as 
manager as a way to use what he learned in 
SOM. The school's curriculum was very 
structured, but it provided students with a 
good overview of managerial skills. 

Although it was academically 
challenging, Dave found time to get in- 
volved with other things at B.C. He spent 
his "junior year abroad" as a resident assis- 
tant in Hardey dormitory on Newton 
Campus. It was "a lot of give and take" and 



it required a large time committment, but 
Dave looked at it as a way of contributing 
something to B.C. 

"The greatest thing about having gone to 
Boston College is the ability to say 'I went to 
Boston College.'" Where did Dave see 
himself ten years from now? "I see myself as 
a well-off, over-weight, bald man with 
seven children and a beautiful wife coming 
to all the home football games. I'll be on 
Shea field in a Winnebago." 

Dave faced graduation with mixed 
emodons. "SOM has been four years of 
being primed. It's been a very textbook 
oriented education with a lot of case 
studies. I'm excited about taking what I've 
learned and applying it to the real world, 
and making lots of money. But maybe I 
won't make it. Maybe I won't be happy. 
There's a lot of anxiety, a black spot, to see 
what the future will hold. And about 
leaving B.C. ..I'm bummed." 



Roberta Blaz 



Perspectives 183 








m^: 









August 1, 



Dear CarOlyxty 

I hope you are enjoying your summer vacation. But, 
September is fast approaching and it won't be long until you are ^ 
a freshman at Boston College! | 

My name is Debbie Kelly and I am going to be your freshmari__ 
assistant. We'll be spending orientation week together. I'm a 
senior in the school of Arts and Science, majoring in Speech 
Commitinications. You and the other five freshmen in the group 
are also comimunication majors so I'm sure we'll have much in 
common. I caji help you with any problems or questions you 
may have and recommend courses and teachers for you to take. 

Our first meeting will be Siinday September 1st, at 9:00 AM 
Campion Hall room 201. I have circled Campion Hall on the 
enclosed map. This first meeting will give our group a chance to 
get to know each other. After we will go to a welcome in Roberts 
Center given by Father Monan, President of the University and 
by the President of UGBC. Following the welcome we can go on a: 
tour of the cam.pus. I can point out where aJl your classes are 
and where you have to go to see your advisor and so forth. Folio 
wing the tour we can go to m.y apartment for lunch. I live on 
lower cam.pus in 316 Edmonds Hall. I have circled Edmonds in; 
case you need to come see me before September 1st. I jarill be 
ing in August 28th so feel free to stop by. 3^^=* !====^=ses=^^ 
-^^^ We meet for the second time on Monday in Campion 20 1 , once 
again, at 10:00 PM, and from there we will go the New Theater to 
hear from the Dean of Arts and Sciences, Father Neenan. 

Tuesday, September 3rd will be our Boston day. Wear comfoi 
table shoes and bring money for the T (75 cents). I will take you\ 
on a walking tour of Boston's historical sights and then we cai 
go to Faneiiil Hall for lunch! 

I am looking forward to meeting you on September 1st. If you 
want to talk to me before September here is my number: (617)- 
484-3303. Now I'll let you get back to the beach and siunmer fun. 

See you soon, 

Debbie 





186 Remember 



^/-i.^ 





, : Vice President Fr. Joseph Fahey, SJi 

.freshmen a crash course in culture on the 

useum of Fine Arts (lop); Freshmen on Newton 

discovered the hard way that buses were the only 

way to go (bottom right); BC Freshman Assistant 

rem inds her group members of their first meeting 

Bgand place (bottom left). 





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188 Remember 




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Freshman year and "The Boston 
College Experience" began in a 
rather ordinary rectangular cinder- 
block room equipped with the barest of 
essentials: two beds, two desks, two 
bureaus, two lamps and a garbage can. The 
object of the game was to take all this luxury 
and make it "home," because, like it or not, 
home it would be for the next few months. 
The transformations were swift and in- 
spiring. Pictures and favorite posters from 
home were the first to grace those cement 
walls. They would soon be accompanied by 
tailgate pictures, and the Heights issue 
when you made the police report. At least 
one stereo per room was hooked up, and 
one could often hear an entire dorm tuned 
to a great song on WHTT or KISS. Hot 
pots, toaster ovens, refrigerators and 
popcorn poppers were essential in every 
room when late-night munchies attacked. 
Then there were the "creative decorat- 
ing" missions. The quest? Milk crates for 
everything under the sun and street signs to 
add character. Usually it was your 
roommate who pulled off these litde capers 
with you, laying the foundations for a 
friendship that would last at least four 
i years. You knew you had a good thing 
"§ going when you engineered the plot to 
^ "borrow" that couch in the study lounge- 
^ and pulled it off! 



While your roommate was your first 
friend at B.C., each day you met more 
people from your dorm. They were the 
ones who saw you at your worst (right 
before your 9:00 midterm) as well as your 
best. Before you knew it, Christmas break 
was over, and you were calling B.C. 
"home". You couldn't wait to get back to 
hall sports and snowball fights, study 
breaks and all-nighters(?), community 
showers and those daily social events- 
dinner at McElroy or Stuart. But most of 
all, you wanted to be back in the place that 
made you feel like you belonged. 

Freshman year came to an end, and 
everyone scattered- to off-campus, Walsh, 
and a few to Upper Campus or College 
Road, but the dorm would always be spe- 
cial. Somehow it had changed from a brick 
building into something more- filled with 
countless memories where dreams and 
fears, heartache and happiness were 
shared. Within the safety of its walls, there 
was built a community of lasting friend- 
ships- a home. 



Judy Vogtle 



Home again, Home again (top left); Penthouse 
view (top right); Dorm resident wonders if there's 
nowhere he can ha ve a moment to himself (bottom 
right); The gangs all here (bottom left). 



Dorms 189 




IN LINE 



. . . m> 



Undoubtedly, B.C. had given us a 
well-rounded education. We had 
taken courses in the arts, the 
sciences and yes, the guts. But, the one class 
you couldn't find listed in the course 
description booklet was "The Art of Stand- 
ing in Line," better known as Patience 101. 

Lines, lines, lines. ..we'd been in so many 
lines at this school they even decided to 
name a building after them (?). One thing 
was for sure, the most favorite line was no 
line. 

Remember waiting in the Baybanks line 
only to find out you didn't have any money 
left. And who even tried to make a 
withdrawal on a Friday afternoon? By the 
time you made it to the head of that line you 
had already gone through withdrawal 
yourself. 

Or how about the catch-all drop/add line, 
every semester without fail. What a comfor- 



ting feeling to know you had waited all that 
time only to find that ail the classes you 
wanted were filled. 

Isn't it fimny how you'd stand in line at 
the Eagle's Nest and instead of moving 
forward you'd be moving backward. The 
only thing that line was good for was in- 
digestion. 

After long, hard years of battle in the 
bookstore, you finally came to the conclu- 
sion that the only way to have dealt with 
those lines was to have waited until October 
to buy your books. Too bad when the 
demand went down, the prices didn't. 

Or how about those early mornings and 
endless hours you spent waiting in the 
Screw your Roommate ticket line. How 
frustrating that you had lost those precious 
hours of sleep only to find out your 
roommate really did "screw" you. 

There were only three lines, however. 



WaiHng is 
nardesi part 

that did in some way seem justified at this 
school. Those hot nights were well spent in 
the White Mountain line. Your reward: 
Oreo ice-cream with three, maybe four 
mix-ins. 

No one denied the Rat line was well 
worth it... or if they did complain you still 
found that person among the crowd the 
next week. And weren't you psyched when 
you moved to the front of the MA's line 
only because your "good friend" had 
somehow become the bouncer. 

There was also a lighter side to waiting in 
lines. It was how you found out about a 
good number of parties, and yes, all the 
gossip. And look at all the friends you met 
while standing in them. Ah, those lines... 



Sue Clark • 



190 Remember 



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192 Remember 




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So, you missed mom's food this year. 
Missed the way she added just the 
right amount of salt to your veggies 
orjust enough bhieberries to your nuif tins. 
The campus food was a big switch for 
anyone accustomed to individualized 
service, and the B.C. Dining Service 
realized that. "There are so many people," 
admitted executive cfief, Peter Douchette, 
"that we're not going to compare with 
mother." However, they tried their hardest 
to come as close as possible to the 
homemade meals you had come to know 
and love. 

Douchette sat proudly in his office, 
surrounded by awards and mementos 
gathered over his many years as a chef. 
Preparing daily meals for thousands of 
students was a complicated task and 
Douchette, after ten years of practice at 



B.C., knew the routine. "We start planning 
at the begiiHiing of the summer, deciding 
what was good, what the students like," said 
Douchette who, along with other food 
service personnel, prepared a yearly four 
week menu. This menu was subject to 
change over the year according to student 
preference: "We do what the students like 
to have done." 

The provisions were ordered a week in 
advance according to a Production Sheet 
which specified a food's history of being 
eaten and of being left-over. And, contrary 
to popular belief, the edibles at B.C. were, 
in fact, edible. A campus dietician made 
sure that each meal was well-balanced and 
complete. Nine cooks, 140 food personnel 
and 400 hired students made it possible for 
everyone to be fed each night. In McElroy 
alone, two thousand entrees were served a 



night, roast beef, pasta and fries being 
among the favorites. As Douchette 
admitted, "The food is one of the best." 

Youdidn'i ihiiik so? Think again. Boston 
College was one of the only schools in this 
area with its own private dining service. 
Most other institutions had food prepared 
by national services which did not allow for 
the personal treatment that was offered at 
the Heights. The staff saw a difference too. 
"Its a much better feeling working for 
yourself rather than an outsider," said 
Douchette, "This is our own food service 
and that makes me more attached." And 
with the help of the Dining Services, he 
hoped that for students, B.C. would truly 
become a "home away from home," food 
and all. 



Amy Seigenthaler , 



.^^?6<i^ yU,^:^.^ /tC^ryu^yn/t^yi.^^ P 







"Carrots" presented by Frank, one of B.C.'s 
finest (inset left); "Here's the beef!" (bottom 
right); Chef Peter Douchette reveals inside 
scoop on BCDS (left). 



Dining Services 193 



AND THEY'RE OFF 



The wave of moving vans began dur- 
ing the tail end of August. Rising 
and heightening as the days wore 
on, it reached its climax as a tumult of 
students and their tumult of belongings 
descended upon such streets as Egremont, 
Sutherland and Chiswick. And the show 
began. 

Thus premiered the 1985-86 off-campus 
season. Receiving unfavorable reviews in 
past years, due to the hassles of finding an 
apartment, catching buses, and buying 
food, off-campus life gained renewed 
popularity when a new character was intro- 
duced into the plot: The B.C. Alcohol 
Policy. Those students who lived on 
campus the past year realized, with much 
chagrin, that both the RA's and Father 
Hanrahan meant business. Their solution? 
Head off. 

And they did. The students who once 

had felt unlucky to have to live off, quickly 

became aware of the advantages of their 

■ position. Many of them needed not to step 

)ut of their apartment to find a party. In- 



stead, they found their on-campus friends 
on the doorstep, willing to pay upwards of 
five dollars in order to drink off a keg. 

For enterprising off-campus residents, 
this phenomena turned into a gold mine. 
Risking the chance of eviction, some 
students raised enough money to purchase 
such luxuries as gas grills and VCR's. Profi- 
ting from their "misfortune" of living off, 
students raked in the cash while also provi- 
ding their friends with entertainment. 

Perhaps this is the reason off-campus 
students felt no remorse when asking their 
on-campus friends to buy them lunch with 
points. Maybe this was the reason they did 
not complain as much about waking ten 
minutes early to catch a bus. With the onset 
of 1985, off-campus life gained an appeal 
which it had never had before. Freedom of 
drink became worth the little extra efforts, 
and classes became the only functions B.C. 
students attended on campus. 



Amy Seigenthaler 




194 Remember 




The joys of cooking and 
cleaning are two new ex- 
periences enjoyed by off 
campus residents (bottom 
= left); Students take a break 
?f while moving in to their off 
~ campus apartment (top 
T right); Favorite Cleveland 
^ Circle hangout to catch a 
quick "slice" (bottom right). 




Judy Vogtle 



Off Campus 195 




.^^Ji^^ yii^:^^uc> /UyrJ^U^T^ri/oc^ P 



f' 



196 Remember 



DRINK DON'T DRIVE 



// 



Where do you pahk your car] 



7 



n 




D linking and parking were ihe iwo 
most difficult tilings to do on 
campus iliis year. Tfie rules and 
regulations surrounding these two dis- 
similar practices were so abundani thai 
some li.d. sludents were having a hard lime 
telling them a[>arl. It set-med that ifiose 
who regulated parking were slighdy ton- 
fused also. I'or, as the year wore on, people 
became more anfi mcne suspicious that 
Father Hanrahaii had, to no one's 
knowledge, taken over the job ol Dean of 
l^arking as well. 

In order to get an ID (better known as a 
parking sticker), students first had to be of 
legal parking age. Bouncers tonliriually 
stood at the gates, checking ID's as people 
drove in, making sure that no minors 
slipped by. So, for those who did not 
possess an ID, this became a big problem; 
they either had to fake one or go off 
campus to park. Money often changed 
hands as students, desperate for legality, 
paid-off upperclassmen, who didn't need 
ID'S, to get them one instead. But, for those 
unfortunates who couldn't manage to find 
identification, parking was a risk, one that 
often involved warnings, and then fines, if 
they got towed. 

It was easy to see how students at B.C. be- 
came totally confused by the drinking and 
^ parking policies. People didn't know if they 
,^ were getting suspended from housing be- 
g cause they parked on campus or if they 
^ were getting towed in for possession of a 
six-pack. A state of chaos hit campus as 
students attempted to differentiate 
between rules. Finally, the smoke cleared 
and a consensus was reached: if you wanted 
to do something illegal on campus, leave 
the car at home and drink. In the long run, 
it would be much more fun and less of a 
hassle. 



4wv Seigenthaler 



Towed again! A familiar scene on campus this 
year (opposite); A little too close for comfort (top 
right); Even after getting a sticker the tickets add 
up (bottom left and right). 




Parking 197 



N^ 



THE 

BUS 

STOPS 

HERE ? 



C 4 '^^ ^ewton or Circle?' were 
common strains chorusing 
from an impatient bunch of 
students on a typical B.C. day. Whether liv- 
ing on-campus, off-campus or on Newton 
campus, students found that the bus was 
the one and only means of transportation 
offered by B.C. and unless you wanted to 
walk, you had to wait. 

Some alumnae still shudder at the 
thought of it: The Wait. No matter if you 
arrived at the bus stop ten minutes early or 
ten minutes late, the bus had just left and 
inevitably, the next one that rolled by would 
be the wrong one. So, in a huddle, with ten 
strangers, in sub-zero temperatures, you 
stood and waited, and waited, and waited. 

Shivering under the weak shelter, you 
memorized the graffiti on the wall, chatted 



with the Chi-Chi burger man, knawed or 
your arm — anything to pass the time and 
keep you moving. You wondered if the bus 
driver had taken a lunch break. You 
wondered if frostbite had taken over your 
toes. All the while, your eyes were strained 
in hopes of spying the big, four-wheeled 
maroon monster. 

And finally, the bus arrived, rolling up to 
the stop. Your body cracked as you lifted 
your frozen limbs from the bench. Climb- 
ing the steps, walking down the aisle, sitting 
in your seat, you cursed the day you ever 
chose to wait. You realized, too, that you 
would choose to wait again, and again, and 
again! 



Amy Seigenthaler 




198 Remember 




Buses 199 



hen students took their daily 

/trips to the Bookstore, they 
. probably weren't aware of ail the 
care that had been taken in selecting 
employees who would best serve them. "We 
have the best group of cashiers in the 
world," said John Durkin, manager of the 
Boston College Bookstore. "Our people 
have to like students," he added, making 
sure that they won't walk out of the Book- 
store without have acquired what they 
want. 

Each person, therefore, is carefully inter- 
viewed and screened through the Human 
Resources Department. The final decision 
on who will be employed is made by the 
Bookstore and is based on their desire to 
care for and serve the students. 

This business of "caring and service" is a 
lively one and one that, for B.C., is growing 



ftOOKpiT Td 



fast. Plans are in the works for a major ex- 
pansion of the Bookstore so that the 
problems of high demand and long lines 
can be solved. The 1984 sea.son was one of 
unheard of sales for the Bookstore due 
mostly to Flutie mania and B.C.'s newly 
acquired public image. Profits gained from 
this extraordinary year went into the 
general fund of the university and will be 
used for such renovations as new carpeting. 
This emphasis on well qualified employees 
and continual improvements confirms that 
all that is done at the Bookstore is done with 
the student in mind. 

' Amy Seigenthaler — — — — 

A quiet respite at the B.C. Bookstore (background 
shot); Bookstore staff is hard at work (inset). 




Bay Banks machines are too con- 
veniently located (right); Wait 
till you see what's for dinner 
tomorrow night (below); 
Frequent trips to L'il Peach, 
Store 24, or Christy's put a strain 
on student budgets (opposite). 





f^Bnt 




SOM attempted to teach many of us 
how to invest and make money. 
However, one thing no one had to 
teach us was how to spend it. Whether it was 
a credit card, a Baybanks card, or that 
monthly check from Daddy, B.C. students 
were faced with an endless maze of oppor- 
tunities to spend the bucks. 

For some, trips to Star Market or Stop 
and Shop represented the biggest bite out of 
their budget. Wasn't it depressing, though, 
that all of that money had to be spent on 
food and not Filene's. 

The second big expenditure a B.C. 
student faced was the eternal clothes bill. 
The old saying that "When the going gets 
tough, the tough go shopping" certainly 
reflected many of our actions through the 
years. And yes, all those impulsive shop- 
ping sprees usually resulted in the buying 



of a lot of unnecessary things. Filene's, 
Jordan Marsh, Bloomingdale's and VISA 
certainly had the right idea in mass mailing 
pre-approved credit cards to all the people 
on campus. 

Leaving campus never meant leaving our 
wallets behind. Remember those "road 
trips" to concerts and friends' colleges. And 
how about all the bowl games: Tangerine, 
Liberty, Cotton and yes, the fatal Tiki Bowl. 
So exciting, so exhilirating, sooo expensive! 

The bookstore in its infinite wisdom 
learned how to maximize its profits while 
minimizing our wallets. Any way you look 
at it, if you weren't in there buying books, 
you were in there blowing your money on 
an endless line of B.C. paraphenalia. All 
those sweats, shirts, mugs and stationary 
piled miles high in the store. Every time you 
walked in there you came out with some- 



thing new you never really wanted in the 
first place. 

What about the liquid assets? As you 
learned, Boston had a large selection of fine 
drinking establishments that we all at one 
time or another helped to keep afloat. For 
those not too picky about atmosphere, 
MA's or Sam's always did the trick. But for 
those with more refined taste Faneuil Hall 
offered an alternative. 

Well, our parents told us that money 
doesn't grow on trees, but little did we 
listen. However, at B.C. we learned at least 
one thing: It's always nice to have 
money. ..'cause there's always a way to 
spend it. 



• Sue Clark- 



DISAPPEARING DOLLARS 

Now you see 'em, n(^w f ©y d©[n]'S 



202 Remember 



.^C^^C^ ^^^^-6^ /tZyyyiCyJ-r2^i-^!^y\___ 'P 




Andy Ryan 



Spending 203 




204 Remember 



li's a beauiiifiAl day in ike neigkborkood 







Bac kyai'd harbcc iics...( i (H|ihI ...ilic 
" (| 11 a d " . . . " r c g i s I c- r c- d " k c g 
|)arlics...lreshnian girls waiideiiiig 
a roil iid .. .eternal I y sticky kite lien 
floors. ..the swoosh of sliding glass 
doors. ..conversations with your next dooi 
neighbors through the walls. ..carefree 
abandon- these were some of the 
( haracteristics of life in the mods lor the 
li.(j. senior who was lucky enough to have a 
high lottery number junior year. The mods 
were more than just a place to eat, sleep, 
and drink, they were a legend passed down 
by previous upperclassmen to us since 
freshman year. Where else on campus 
could one be awakened by the sound of a 
tennis racquet swatting a tennis ball? 

The mods had their drawbacks, sure, like 
their almost non-existent walls that called 
for keeping gossip to a minimum, and their 
dishwasherless kitchens unlike the plush 
Hillside apartments, but still they reigned 
as "the place to live" for senior year. The 
mods meant there was only one year left to 
have fun. Many mods residents could be 



seen strolling in the direction of the campus 
pub on Tuesday, Wednesday, and 
Thursday niglits. A typical mod was the 
gathering |}lace for late night cram sessions 
for "Tuture of Consciousness." 

It was not uncommon seeing mod 
dwellers taking out the trash, doing dishes, 
or tanning themselves in lounge chairs in 
their very own backyards. The mods meant 
borrowing food from your neighbors with 
the promise you'd return it right away. 
Freshmen were attracted like magnets to 
the mods after hearing rumors of parlies 
but were too afraid to walk into them 
anyway. Hurricane "Gloria" will be 
remembered by those who lived in the 
mods in 1985 as a day for waiting out the 
storm by mudsliding and partying in the 
backyard of IB. Being that the mods were 
almost a thing of the past, they will long be 
remembered by their residents as the last 
gasp before entering the real world. 



Tracey Wallisch 




Mod Life 205 



The Night 
Before 

Twenty was a momentous age for Boston 
College students. Not only was it an obvious 
sign of inevitable adulthood, it was also the 
age at which all bar doors flew open and all 
alcohol ran free. When B.C. students 
celebrated their twentieth birthdays, they 
automatically became legal. With the 
protection of the government of 
Massachusetts, they could drink anything 
and anywhere. Therefore, as one would ex- 
pect, most of the students at Boston College 
were at least twenty. Or their licenses said 
so. 

Twenty was such an undeclared age that 
anyone sixteen to twenty could appear legal 
and get a drink. Bar-hopping was the thing 
to do, and for those who had not yet 
reached that prime age, fake I.D.s were 
easy to come by. All along the streets of 
Boston, photographers, with their Polaroid 
Instamatics, mass produced identification 
cards which required no verification. 
Students were skillful in the art of lamena- 
tion, fixing the authentic licenses of their 
friends. The identification game was one 
which many didn't mind playing. These 
I.D.'s were tickets to social heaven. They 
allowed students to participate in the 
favorite B.C. pasttime . . . drinking. 

Weekends ranged from casual yet wild 
nights at Mary Ann's and Sam's to 
somewhat elegant and fun-filled nights at 
Houlihan's and Division 16. Nightlife in the 
bars made students feel independent, 
sophisticated and mature. It also gave them 
a pretty good buzz. 

The slightest resemblance on a picture 
I.D. was accepted by leniant bouncers at 
bars all over Boston. Students soon learned 
the art of passing already used I.D.'s to 
those friends still waiting in line. Because 
the possibility of being turned away was 
near to impossible, it was extremely easy to 
get in and to get a drink. Students took 
advantage of this easy access. 

Drunkedly unaware of impending 
changes in drinking laws, the carefree 
college student spent his days and nights at 
any bar he chose, in a state of total bliss. No 
time was taken to stop and smell the drink 
which would soon be whipped from his 
hand. If only he had known what soon lay 
ahead for he and his drinking habits. 



Regina Baluyol 




206 S'ighl Before 




■f 










Night Before 207 




I 




c~. 



208 Morning After 




SOCIAL SCENE 



The Morning 
After 



June I, 1985. For many al Boston 
College this dale marked the turning 
point in their social lives. It was on this 
date that the drinking age in 
Massachusetts tfjok its drastic change 
from twenty to twenty-one. It was <jn this 
date that the drinking age at Boston 
College, in accordance with state laws, 
was also altered. It was on this date that 
the gray cloud of sobriety darkened the 
once happy B.C. campus. With the 
change of date came the change of law 
which brought about a change of habit 
for the majority of the University 
community. 

Although the drinking age only 
moved up one year, the age of twenty- 
one held entirely different connotations 
from the age of twenty. For, while most 
everyone could look or at least pretend 
that they were twenty, twenty-one signi- 
fied a maturity that few at B.C. had yet 
reached. Most students, and bouncers, 
realized this fact. The difficulty of 
buying liquor and getting into bars in- 
creased significantly as rules quickly be- 
came more severe and the slightest dis- 
crepancy on an I.D. became reason for 
rejection. Those under the age of 
twenty-one fortunate enough to be able 
to own an acceptable fake I.D., then 
faced the problem of purchasing a 
Massachusetts Liquor License which 
required several forms of often un- 
attainable identification. The threat of 
immediate imprisonment discouraged 
many attempts by students to obtain one 
of these prized forms of I.D.'s. Most 
finally consented to go without . 

Drinking, therefore, became a 
welcome luxury rather than an old habit. 
It presented a problem and was a hassle. 
However, B.C. students always loved a 
challenge. They soon discovered sneaky 
devices which helped them circumvent 
the new restrictions. They overcame the 
inconvenience. Not wishing to break the 
long tradition of drinking at B.C., 
students became friendly with bouncers 
and discovered back entrances. Few 
students lost their buzz and few bars lost 
their business. 



Regina Baluyot 



Morning After 209 



SONG 




Chorale 



Amid the great number of social and 
athletic activities on the Boston College 
campus, there reigned one organization 
which strained the tongues and lungs of the 
members, not the triceps and biceps. Those 
who belonged to the University Chorale, in 
melodious tones, added a much needed 
cultural dimension to the Boston College 
community. They voiced the ideas and in- 
spirations expressed by composers, over 
the centuries, in music. 

One needed only to attempt to carry a 



Concerts which included these different 
forms of music were presented both on 
campus and throughout New England, 
often with full orchestra. 

The Chorale, which practiced three 
evenings a week, contributed greatly to the 
musical culture of the Boston College 
community, while affording its members 
the opportunity to perform great music 
with a high degree of professionalism. Run 
by an elected student executive board, 
those in the organization were united into 



tune in order to appreciate the efforts of one big "family" by the desire to give a 



the talented members of the Chorale. From 
bass to soprano, each individual had to stay 
on key as well as in harmony with his fellow 
performers. This proved no simple task, 
and only those capable of fulfilling 
necessary voice 
requirements at 
auditions were 
able to join the 
select group. 

In its 31st year 
under the direc- 
tion of Dr. C. 
Alexander Pel- 
oquin, Boston 
College's com- 
poser-in-res- 
idence, the 163 
member Chorale 
was composed of 
undergraduate 
and graduate stu- 
dents as well as 
faculty and staff. 
It performed 
works from both 
a traditional and 
contemporary 
repertorie. 

Handel's "Messiah" as well as modern 
liturgical pieces composed by Dr. Peloquin, 
were among the Chorale's many selections. 




Chorale performances were always inspiring. Photos 
by Geoff Why. 



polished performance each time they went 
on stage. 

Although despondant over the cancella- 
tion of their engagement to perform in 
Rome at the Vatican and at North 

American Uni- 
versity due to 
numerous terro- 
rist attacks in 
Europe at that 
time, the mem- 
bers of the 
Chorale re- 
mained spirited 
and enthusiastic 
about their 
Spring concert 
and Palm Sunday 
Liturgy. This 
dedication and 
spirit, along with 
the fine voices of 
the chosen mem- 
bers, resulted in 
establishing the 
Boston College 
Chorale as one of 
the finest college 
choruses in the 



United States. 



Catherine Doody 



■%■■ 



IJRM 



■^ni 



i -^-v 



210 Chorale 




Chorale 211 




212 Drama 




STAGE 



DRAMA 




For years the Boston College conimiiiiity 
had been entertained and touched by the 
dramatic productions presented by the 
University's own thespian organization, the 
Boston College Dramatics Society. This 
group, once again during its 1985-'86 
season, provided its patrons, new and old, 
with a wide variety of theatrical works. 
Diverse productions, such as a British 
comedy and a twentieth century drama 
about fame and power in the eighteenth 
century, were performed with the energy 
and originality that had become the 
hallmark of the society. 

October 25, 1985 ushered in the new 
season with the dedication of the E. Paul 
Robsham, Jr. Theatre. The ceremony in- 
cluded speeches by Father Monan and 
various members of the B.C. Dramatics 
Society. Family 
and friends of 
the R o b s h a m s 
attended along 
with many in- 
dividuals from 
the B.C. commu- 
nity. 

Following the 
ceremony, all 
were treated to a 
performance of 
Peter Shaffer's 
newest success, 
"Amadeus," di- 
rected by Dr. J. 
Paul Marcoux. 
The previous 
weekend had 
seen the opening 
of Second Season 
performances 
with "You're a 
Good Man 

Charlie Brown," directed by senior, Mary 
Pat Dunn. Both of these productions 
proved to be harbingers of a successful and 
entertaining season. 

The B.C. campus was given a delicious 
taste of the yuletide spirit in the form of a 



touching adaptation of Charles Dickens' "A 
Christmas Carol," directed by senior, 
Stephen Flatley. On the mainstage, at this 
time, the first of two guest directors, David 
Woodman, treated the audience with the 
presentation of the British comedy, 
"Bedroom Farce." The production 
provided for countless guffaws and 
prepared the anxious actors, actresses and 
patrons for the season's second half. 

Two Irish plays were the first presen- 
tations of the Dramatics Society in the 
second part of the season. "Kathleen Ni 
Houlihan" and "The Spancel of Death" 
were both directed by Tomas MacAnna of 
the Abbey Theatre, Dublin, Ireland. These 
two shows were juxtaposed brilliantly 
against Second Season's production of Neil 
Simon's riotous "God's Favorite." Follow- 
ing the tradition 




B.C. actor in dramatic role (above); Actors in scene 
from campus production of "Bedroom Farce" 
(opposite). 



of B.C. Second 
Season, this show 
was once again 
directed by a 
senior, Richard 
Carey. 

The already 
supremely suc- 
cessful year for 
the Boston 
College Drama- 
tics Society closed 
with the musical 
celebration, 
"Once Upon a 
Mattress," 
directed by 
Howard Enoch. 
For its gifted 
members, the 
year was one of 
intense study and 
performance. 
However, it was ultimately a gratifying ex- 
perience as each curtain fell to the applause 
of an audience which had been thoroughly 
entertained. 

— C.C. Lambrow and Timothy W. Pierce -— 



Drama 213 



— PESTS 

Unwanted 
Guests 

Faster than your roommate, able to 
climb tall walls in a single bound . . . it's a 
spot, it's a crumb ... no, it's Roachman! 
He was always there when you needed 
him least. He knew the campus like the 
back of his hand. Walsh, Edmunds, 
Hillsides, and the Mods werejust a few of 
the many places that he called home. 
When you stepped out of the shower, 
reached for the snickers on the top 
shelf, or put your hand in your bookbag, 
he was always right there at your side. 
And so that he wouldn't get lonely on his 
visit, Roachman always brought along 
his family. 

Since as long as most of us could 
remember, roaches and their rodent and 
reptile friends were secret inhabitants of 
Boston College housing. They did not 
break drinking rules or steal trays from 
the dining halls. But they did not pay tui- 
tion bills or register for classes either. 
Therefore, the establishment wanted the 
roaches and their cohorts off campus. 

This, however, did not prove an easy 
task. The roaches were quick, and 
students, in their lethargic state, could 
prove no match for their speed. The 
more they tried to catch or stomp them, 
the more the roaches trained, to increase 
their speed, at the Roach Gym (nextdoor 
to the Roach Motel). Poison didn't work. 
Traps didn't work. The roaches were 
just too clever and students, even with 
the advantage of a Boston College 
education, could not mentally keep up 
with the roaches' cunning little minds. 

Exterminators from all around the 
world were called upon to help with the 
eviction. But, as hard as they tried, no 
one could seem to get these violators of 
housing regulations in front of the 
judiciary board or into the Dean of 
Student's office. These stubborn litde 
creatures, like their fellow student 
residents at B.C., had been struck by the 
contagious B.C. spirit and had decided 
to stay. They loved the University (espe- 
cially the dining services) as much or 
more than Father Monan himself. It was 
a hopeless case. They were here for 
good. 

Outside of a few shouts or shrieks dur- 
ing the night, peace returned to Boston 
College. Man and roach lived in near- 
perfect harmony. We couldn't whip 'em 
or join 'em. So we just tolerated 'em. 



Ellen Dadekian 















■^». 



^ 



'" ' 



JbyL. 



*%^ 



Roaches quickly become "part of the family.' 
Photos by Geoff Why. 






\^0i. 



214 Roaches 



^ckX^^H foK Gory 




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Roaches 215 




216 Masses 




Campus 
Masses 

Father Adclman, I'alhcr Hanrahan, and 
KalhcT Ncenan all had sfnneihing in 
(ommon outside the fact that they were 
niemhers of tfie same religious fjrder. 
They, along with a number of otlier [priests 
on campus, were responsible for the fiorni 
Masses wliich became institutions at Boston 
C^ollege, and set the tone for an integral 
part of B.C. campus life. 

Each Sunday, in practically every dorm 
on campus, one or more Eucharistic 
celebrations were said. Numerous students 
attended these services in order to receive 
spiritual guidance and peace with God and 
themselves. Especially during exam week 
or at times of great stress and tension, 
students could be seen trekking to the 
basements or lounges of their 
dorms, looking for heavenly aid as well as an 
hour of silence and solitude. Students often 
saw religion as the greatest strength during 
trying times and found great comfort in the 
fact that they could go to Mass donning 
their sweats and sneakers. 

Almost always informal, the dorm 
Masses gave a person a chance to attend a 
religious service without actually going to 
St. Ignatius on Sunday morning. Students 
were able to worship in the comfort of their 
own dormitory and with their own neigh- 
bors and friends. The dorm Mass provided 
a convenience that many found difficult to 
ignore. Since it was no longer a task to 
attend Mass, more students took advantage 
of the opportunity. 

The Masses in the dorms also enabled 
students to become integrally involved in 
the service. They were given the opportu- 
nity to participate as Eucharist ministers 
and lectors. Informal choruses and folk 
groups were also independently formed by 
students. 

Although the Catholic religion was never 
forced upon students at B.C., one was 
always able to participate in the faith if they 
so wished. The prime example of in- 
volvement in Catholicism would be that of 
the dorm Mass. It was where students could 
find support and love from fellow students 
and Jesuits without leaving their own 
homes. 



Keith Gnazzo 



Masses 217 



SHOPPING 



4:30 on a Thursday afternoon. Two 
quizzes and an un-researched, un-written, 
un-typed paper due tomorrow. Freshmen 
worried, but upperclassmen knew better. 
There was only one way to deal with a crisis 
like this and the seasoned student knewjust 
what to do. The laundry had to wait.. .the 
change had to be used for something far 
more important. When the going got 
tough, the tough went shopping! 

The nature of the shopping depended a 




^H^ 



Filene's basement-always a bargain shopper's dream 
(above); A size for everyone (opposite). 



Geoff Why 



great deal more on the nature of the im- 
pending disaster than on the need to buy 
anything in particular. For a quick fix, the 
Chestnut Hill Mall offered a classy but ex- 
pensive escape. Besides, a long walk is 
always good for clearing the mind for 
study. 

But in times of real disaster, it was neces- 
sary to remove oneself completely from the 
scene of the crime, to a new crime scene, 
where a new kind of crime could take place. 
The crime, of course, was spending. And 
most all B.C. students could be convicted. 
The more spending done, the more time 
necessary for returns next week - when a 
full-scale term paper hung overhead. 

To really spend, it was necessary to 
convince oneself that enough had been 
saved to make the amount spent im- 
material. To accomplish this, the well- 
trained student headed straight for Park 
Street and Filene's Basement. Here the 
bargains were always easy to come 
by. Interesting note: though it was im- 
possible to remember a single calculus 
equation the next day, one always 
remembered the original price and the 
markdown prices on any item bought in the 
basement.) 

If one wished to assume the identity of a 
student from another college. Harvard 
Square was the answer. Here one could 
shop for more exotic items and soothe the 
nerves with more complicated, in- 
tellectually enriching foods. The true 
escapist drank coffee in an obscure cafe and 
assumed the identity of a mysterious and 
misunderstood writer. This face was easy to 
produce when one's mysterious and 
misunderstood history notes came to mind. 

Copley Place and Newbury Street were 
good excuses to get dressed up and spend 
hours searching for the "perfect thing," or 
a less than perfect thing at a terrific price. 

Whatever escape route taken, reality, on 
weekdays, tended to sink in between 7:00 
and 8:00 P.M. (One need not be troubled 
with reality on weekends.) It was time to dig 
for change for the T, sprint down to the 
tracks, and wait twenty minutes for a B.C. 
train. Or maybe take the Cleveland Circle 
train and pick up some things in the 
circle. ..Or maybe the D line to Newton 
Center... 

1^^^^— Amy Innes DiBona ^^^^^ 



218 Shopping 





"viio 





Shopping 219 




220 Regatla 



TRADITIONS 



Gotta Regatta 




Weeks belore ihc main e\eiil, jjcople 
began to anticipate il. They waited im- 
patienlly. They polished np their l)oaliiig 
shoes, shined their sunglasses, and packed 
(heir picnics. Everybody was going to the 
Regatta (or "The Head of the Charles"), 
and everybody was psyched for it. 

And why shouldn't they have been? The 
Regatta was not only the most fmi rowing 
event in the world ... it was also tiie largest. 
However, it was not just the race which 
drew such a mass of spectators. There was 
something else awaiting those who 
travelled to the banks of the river . . . the 
people. 

Boston College students who headed to 
the Charles to watch over 3000 rowers 
cover the three miles between the Boston 
University Boat Club and the finish line 
beyond the Eliot Bridge, encountered a 
sorted and interesting group of people. 
The stone-faced boater was matched 
against the goofy rower in bright patterned 
swimming trunks. The nationally famous 
team was matched against the recurrant 
loser. State was matched against state. 
Country was matched against country. This 
odd mixture of participants resulted in an 
odd mixture of spectators. People came 
from all corners of the Earth to view the 



Regatta. C)i so it seemed. Black, white, 
yellow, orange, brown, and beige all 
showed up for the festivities. Faces in the 
crowd donned everything from dark 
"Risky Business" shades to bejeweled horn- 
rinmied glasses. All sorts were there. They 
intertwined, forming a colorful picture on 
the background of blue-green grass. 

Although slightly dismayed by the 
banning of alcoholic beverages at the 
October 1985 race, Boston College 
students still set out, in full force, for a day 
of cheers, sneers, leers, and beers. Early in 
the morning, on overflowing T's and in 
overflowing cars, they left the campus at 
Chestnut Hill, not intending to return until 
later that evening. Perfect spots were found 
on the banks of the Charles. Tablecloths 
and coolers found their homes in the grass 
and students found their place among their 
friends. The party began. 

No one, by the end, was actually aware of 
who had won. No one, by the end, was 
actually aware of who they had been for. No 
one, by the end, was actually aware of 
where they had been. However, as no one 
could deny, a good time was had by all. 



Amy Seigenthaler 




Boston's Head of the Charles Regatta is a perennial favorite. Photos by Gary Fung 



Regatta 221 



SUPERBOWL 



Patriot's Fever 



It was Super Bowl time again, and 
surprisingly, the Patriots were right in 
there. And Boston citizens and B.C. 
students were right in there with them. 

For those who had not followed the 
sordid history of the Patriots' football club, 
they may not have been aware that the team 
had rounded out the bottom of their 
division for over thirty years. What few 
people in the sports world realized was that 
the Patriots, by finishing last for so long, 
were actually accumulating first round 
draft picks, and amassing an undefeatable 
squad of talented players. 

Super Bowl XX pitted these champion- 
ship veterans against the Chicago Bears. 
Chicago played a near perfect season, 
winning fifteen of its sixteen games. In light 
of this fact, the Bears were a ten point 
favorite in this clash. The seemingly in- 
destructible team, with an array of inter- 
esting and entertaining characters, seemed 
a clear winner over the weaker Pats. 

However, the people of Boston and the 
students of Boston College had faith in 
their team. Despite seemingly in- 



surmountable odds, the city, which had 
already been amazed by the teams number 
of surprising wins, rallied around to 
support its champions. A Patriot pep rally 
took place in the City Hall Plaza to welcome 
back the Pats from their Miami victory. 
Students, many who had never taken inter- 
est in the losing New England team, 
huddled around television sets and joined 
in victorious celebrations. Local radio 
stations cleverly changed the words to 
popular songs to help in encouraging the 
Patriots on to victory. "Squish the Fish" and 
"Berry the Bears" took their long awaited 
place in the Bostonian vocabulary. 

Patriot fever reached record-breaking 
temperatures in Boston. All the symptoms 
were present and the thermometer reading 
indicated that Bostonians were ready for a 
change in the Pats. Overcome with enthu- 
siasm, they waited, with bated breath, for 
the outcome of the Super Bowl where team 
would be matched against team, city against 
city, and spirit against spirit. 



Steven Martin 




"Berry the Bears" was New England's battlecry. Photos by Geoff Why. 




222 Patriot Fever 




Patriot Fever 223 



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fa« Series 



LECTURES 



Humanities Series 



Rounding out its thirtieth year, the 
Boston College Humanities Series 
presented ten events in the 1985-'86 
program. They were free to the Boston 
College faculty and students, and the 
general public. 

JP Donleavy, Irish novelist, spoke on 
"Tools and Traumas of the Writing 
Trade," on September 19. On October 3, 
Nobel Laureate Mairead Corrigan Maguire 
spoke on the work of the Peace People in 
Northern Ireland. The annual Alice 
Bourneuf Lecture was given on October 10 
by Professor Edward J. Kane of Ohio State. 
Professor Peter Arnott of Tufts staged a 
marionette performance of Antigone on 
October 24. Mary Gordon, novelist, 
lectured on November 7 on the topic, "A 
Writer Among Irish Catholics." 

Poet, Amy Clampitt began the second 
semester offerings, reading from her 
poems on March 13. On March 28, Wilfrid 
Sheed, novelist, spoke on "The Life-Cycle 
of a Book," and another novelist, Brian 
Moore, described "The Writer as Exile." 
This was the Levine Lecture in Irish 
Studies. 

"The New China of Tomorrow" was the 
topic of Professor Yuan-Li Wu, of Stanford 
University, on April 7. The final event of 
the year was a lecture on April 10 by 
Reverend Norbert Lohfink, SJ, on 
"Deuteronomy: The People of God as a 
Learning Community." 

— ^— ^-^ Francis W. Sweeney, SJ ^—^— 




Humanities Series lectures provided students worldly knowledge. Photos by John Vachon and Ellis Herwig. 




226 (Campus Colors 



Amid the lowers of 'I'he Heif^lUs, 
Tlie leaves all look, their festive 
nights, 
Spiraling gently to the earth. 
Bringing news of fall's rebirth. 

Heads buried deep in lofty books 
Failed to lift, to take a look 
At quilts of russet, gold and red 
Which covered up their once green bed, 

And tucked them in, forewarning frost 
and other signs of summers lost. 
But if, by chance, the heads did rise 
Toward hiding sun and graying skies, 

Waiting was such beauty rare. 
The morning fog, the ice-laced air 
Were proof of many Autumns past, 
When footballs flew to band's shrill blast; 

And rain drizzled cooly to the ground 

Where well-wrapped students could be 

found 

Hurrying to class before the wind 

Convinced them to go home again. 

Where, shielded from the bitter cold. 
That falling temperatures foretold. 
They drank in warmth from steaming cups 
That thawed the heart, kept spirits up. 

And gloried at the many things, 
That Fall, in all its brilliance, brings. 



Amy Seigenthaler 





New England autumn at its finest (opposite top); 
Fallen leaves clutter campus (opposite left); Autumn 
in the quad (opposite right); Dave Sutton kicks up 
heels in autumn leaves (above); Matt Rockett enjoys 
the splendor of a perfect autumn day (left). 



Camptis Color 227 



The ultimate Guidance counselor (below); Registrar 
personnel cross off classes as they close during regis- 
tration (right); Sophomore student is pleased to see 
none of his courses are closed (opposite); "Student 
checks to see what courses are offered" (below right). 




Andy Ryan 




228 (Jioosing (Aasses 



3 




I 




▼ ▼ s 



4 « ^ A 7^ hat classes am I going to 
take?" At the end of each 
semester, the same infernal 
question was asked. And it never proved an 
easy one to answer. Sitting among 
numerous and unorganized course 
schedule pages, the confused student had 
to take this seriously. It was necessary for 
the continuation of his higher education. 
And, of course, it was tedious, difficult and 
complicated. 

The B.C. student had to primarily dis- 
cover what was required for the completion 
of the core courses and his major. In other 
words, he had to find out what he had to 
take to graduate. Memories of the 
threatening words of parents before 
returning for the semester ("If you get 
lower than a 3.899, you're done for!!!") 
drew the student to the "gut" courses; those 
he could take and, most probably, pass. 
They donned a variety of names: Science 
for the Inferior, Kindergarten Calculus, 
History of the Comic Strip. They appealed 
to the masses. They were filled within the 



first hour of registration. 

The student whose registration slot was 
beyond that first slot, erased them from his 
list of possible courses and climbed to the 
next rung of the registration ladder. He 
turned to those classes which were affec- 
tionately called, "Classes that sound hard 
but, if you show up, act interested, 
memorize the professor's office hours and 
complement his wife, you're assured a 
respectable grade." Simple enough. But 
getting into these still proved a chore, to the 
chagrin of the student, his Mom, his Dad 
and his grade point average. 

He then resorted to the classes from 
which even graduate students steered clear. 
The "Be here every day, be on time, be alert 
and be ready to memorize each and every 
definition" classes. In these could be found 
last-slotted Freshmen and calculator-toting 
bookworms. Also, the "I really want to learn 
this semester and get something out of 
college" students can be sighted. However, 
you had to look fast. They withdrew after 
the first week. 



So, the student sat there on the floor, eyes 
tired, head weary, back strained and course 
registration sheet empty. There was only 
one answer to the problem, and it was in- 
evitable. The next day, the student went to 
registration. Sitting down in that awkward 
green chair, next to that awkward wide- 
eyed lady who operated that awkward, in- 
trusive computer, the student spouted out 
numbers, picked at random. "Thank you. 
You can pick up your list of courses at the 
printer," said the awkward lady, computer- 
strained eyes bugging even further. 

Eyeing the paper as it rolled off the 
machine, the student laughed at the 
printout. No, these classes would not be as 
difficult as first thought. As a matter of fact, 
they wouldn't be hard at all. In that 
spontaneous burst of random numbers, the 
student had, unknowingly, registered for 
the classes he had just completed that 
semester. Which way to Drop-Add, please? 



Amy Seigenthater 



Choosing Classes 229 




For Boston, For Boston . . . 
We sang our proud refrain. Again 
and again the words echoed across 
the grounds that we fondly called "The 
Heights." Boston College. Fans cheered 
when the first note was played, when the 
name was said. Alumni danced to the 
resounding words. It was spirit and if 
anyone had it, we did, and we knew it. 

Priding ourselves on excellent tailgates, 
great attendance at games and outstanding 
alumni support, the Boston College 
community liked to show its true colors. 
Blood running pure Maroon and Gold, the 
masses came running whenever the first 
whistle blew, the first beer can popped. 
And they remained . . . until the last swig 
was swug and the last second played. No 
one could deny that, whether win or lose, 
we sure had fun doing it. All in the name 
and honor of B.C. 

Who else would wish death upon a 
Providence hockey player except those 
loyal B.C. fans? Who else would want to 
desecrate the Holy Cross except those with 



bells on, ready to defend our school and 
flatten anyone who used her name in vain. 

That was what it was all about. Tradition. 
The stronghold of our community. The 
motive behind our unfailing spirit. 

But the spirit of Boston College spanned 
far beyond the playing field or athletic 
arena. It spanned far beyond the Bay State 
or Alumni parking lots. B.C.'s traditions 
and spirit were just as emphatically demon- 
strated in the academic and social realms as 
they were in the athletic. The Boston 
College community continually strove to 
uphold its reputation of academic ex- 
cellence and social awareness. Anyone who 
frequented the O'Neill Library and found 
it jam-packed, attended a moving lecture or 
an emotionally stimulating rally could attest 
to this. The true spirit of Boston College 
was the intangible sense of community felt 
by every student, faculty member and 
alumnus. 



Amy Seigenthaler 
• Joanne Conle - 



230 BC Spirit 




The spirit of academic excellence at BC captured in a 
„ student on the O'Neill library steps (opposite); 

'^ Enthusiastic fan cheers for the team at the Miami 

in 

^ football game (left); Traditional tailgating turns into 
— "hood gating" for die hard Eagle fans (bottom left); 
CO BC spirit spianned beyond playing field into the so- 
cial realm (bottom). 




Geoff Why 



BC Spirit 231 



This man had jazz. 
This man had pizazz. 
But this man got the blues, 
And it don't get no worse than this. 
This man got the mailroom blues. 

For most students on B.C.'s campus, this 
was the song they sang most . . . "The 
Empty Mailbox Blues." No matter if you 
were the most popular dude around, you 
were just as low as the rest of us when it 
came to mail. We either all got nothing at all 
or all got the same thing. It began to seem as 
if UGBC cared more for us than our 
parents, friends and grandmas. By the end 
of the year, we were sure they did. 

Of course, by senior year, the mail 
situation had become old hat. The only 
thing we looked for in our mailboxes was 
our extra supply of oxygen. However, our 
traumatic mailroom days as freshmen had 
not totally escaped our memories. Those 
countless hours spent running to the 
mailbox, searching among the molecules 
for some sort of correspondence . . . 

It had all seemed hopeful when we had 
left high school. With our address books 
lined with names, we had come, prepared 
to write daily. Where had all the time gone? 
Looking back on those names, we 
wondered where our many high school 
buddies were now and why they had never 
written. 

Those painful, woe-begotten days ended 
long ago, but the memory remained. And 
occasionally, just occasionally, we would 
once again venture into the mailroom. 
Amid the countless moans and wails, we 
would take a peek in the box, hoping to find 
one of those many letters that we were sure 
had been lost in the mail. 



Amy Seigenthaler 




^Hailroom ^lues 



Mailroom Blues 232 




t^^**: 






Yet another trip to the mailroom . . . (large photo); 
. . . and another case of those "mailroom blues" 
(inset). 



Mailroom Blues 233 




Bill Russell 



234 Road Tup!, 



\r 



Koad trips make for wild weekends (left); B.C. road- 
tripper about to add last bundle to packed car 
(opposite, bottom); Primitive accommodations add 
spice to road trips (opposite, bottom); Loaded car 
ready to "get outta town" (below). 



K 





I Ou l@ Toum 



44 



G 



endemen, I have the perfect 
■solution to this problem . . . 
Road Trip!" 

The saying was coined in the blockbuster 
movie, "Animal House." But the popularity 
of roadtrips had existed for some time. 
Whether it be to Penn State, to Vermont to 
ski, to Biffs beach cottage or Myrtle's 
house, the road trip became a common 
entity, a well-known companion during the 
college years. 

What was the appealing factor of these 
weekend, and sometimes weeknight, 
ventures? Maybe it was the the appeal of ex- 
ercising collegiate freedom. Maybe it was 
the appeal of traveling wherever you 



wanted. Maybe it was the desire to see your 
long-lost acquaintance from golden days of 
high school. Maybe it was the wish to escape 
your cramped existence at B.C., hitting the 
highway, wind whipping through your 
hair. Whatever the reason, roadtrips were 
important parts of the college experience. 
For some, they were a necessity. 

These trips provided many good times 
for students, but, more importantly, they 
led to unbelievable stories that always 
seemed to coincide with life on the road. 
Bags were packed, cars loaded and coolers 
filled. The highways and bi-ways were on 
the horizon, ready to be tackled by B.C. 
students. 



Some trips were local, to near-by schools. 
Others were more colorful, such as ex- 
cursions out west or to Ft. Lauderdale. But, 
perhaps for the class of 1986, the trips to 
the Tangerine, Liberty and Cotton bowls 
proved best of all. 

These infamous journeys did, however, 
have their drawbacks, the most famous 
being the "C equals E times P, squared" 
equation. Translated, it meant, "cost equals 
empty pockets, squared." Still, Boston 
College students were known to fight 
adversity. Whatever the price, the B.C. 
student was always ready and willing to take 
a roadtrip. 
— — — ^-^— Keith Gnazzo — ^^— — 



Road Trips 235 





a 



Number 38!" The cryer 
shrieked over the hustling, 
impatient sound of the 
crowd in Lyons' basement cafeteria. A hand 
rose in the air. "Over here! It's about time!" 
the owner of the hand yelled, his voice 
muffled by the masses who swarmed 
around him. He then made his tedious and 
often dangerous push toward the counter, 
reaching high in order to get a grab at his 
food. Finally arriving, the food was cold. 

Such was the normal routine of lunch at 
Lyons Hall cafeteria. Perhaps it was its 
great location. Perhaps it was the fact that it 
was a great place to study, scope and 
socialize. Whatever the reason, Lyons was 
known far and wide for being packed at 
lunchtime. 

Lyons did not only have a hot lunch line. 
It also hailed of a grocery store, where one 
could purchase anything from Ruffles to 
Windex, and a Deli which sold such dietary 
staples as fresh fruit and homemade candy. 
These added extras, although convienent, 
were not meant for the money-conscious; 
they had reputations for exorbitant prices. 
Still, they did come in handy for those who 
had points to spend. 



236 The Rat 




Bat 



However, not until Thursday nights, 
after the sun liad gone clown, (hd Lyons 
cafeteria show its true colors. Taking on a 
new identity, new name, and new look, the 
mild mannered cafeteria stepped out for a 
night on the town. Tables were moved 
back, kegs were rolled in and "The Rat" was 
ready to party. 

As night fell on the campus, the many 
students who had been heard chorusing, 
"We're going to 'The Rat' tonight!" during 
the day, converged upon the waiting 
cafeteria in full force. Once inside, the 
celebration began as the magnitude of the 
crowd became apparent. After weeks of 
long hours the students were in the mood 
for a good time. 

The next day, Lyons was once again 
retransformed into its old self. Lines again 
extended out its doors and students again 
worked, watched and waited at its tables. 
However, no one had forgotten the night 
before (although some would rather they 
had), and they were all too ready for 
another Thursday to roll around. 



Keith Gnazzo 





Morning at the Rat usually means catching a 
quick bite before class (left); The afternoon 
"scoping" scene is a bit more crowded and so- 
cial (middle); On Thursday nights, pretzels, 
beer, and dancing are the norm (right). 



The Rat 237 




J he strains of the Boston College 
fight song rang true. "For Boston, 
For Boston . . ." It was an 
appropriate lyric. Since many of the B.C. 
students ventured into the city streets dur- 
ing the weekend, they knew Boston almost 
as well as they knew this popular refrain. 
What was the attraction of this city, 
famous for baked beans, the Boston 
Harbor and Faneuil Hall? The fact that 
Boston was a raging college town provided 
some of the main ingredients which led to 
its success. Bars, one of the city's many 
attractions, were first in popularity. 
Topped by the famous "Cheers" bar (The 



Bull 'n Finch Pub), the long list of night 
clubs, throughout Boston, was long and 
diverse. 

Boston's many "hot spots" were often dis- 
covered through the help of limo-races. 
Students paid upwards of twenty dollars in 
order to ride in a limosine and visit such 
bars as The Purple Shamrock, featuring 
live Irish entertainment, Houlihans, in the 
heart of Quincy Market, and TGIFridays, a 
national favorite with its Boston location on 
Exeter Street, in the Back Bay. 

The suburbs boasted of bars which 
attracted a greater number of the B.C. 
crowd. Mary Ann's, the most popular of all 



B.C. favorites, was located in the heart of 
Cleveland Circle. Thursday night was its 
night to shine, as students sought entrance 
into the door of the overflowing pub. 

Still, with the weekend, came the city. 
B.C. students frequented their favorite 
bars or discovered emerging favorites. 
Whether to meet an acquaintance, to ex- 
perience some of the city's culture, to say 
you went to "Cheers," or to have a damn 
good time, the bars in Boston were the 
place to be. 

Keith Gnazzo 



238 Night Life 




si 

My'' 


5 


■HH .it 

1 IIb 




^ I 







To some at B.C., getting in shape 
consisted of walking from the bed 
to the breakfast table and back 
again. However, to a growing number of 
others, getting in shape entailed much 
more than this. These were the people 
making regular visits to the Plex, staying in- 
side for hours on end. They sported more 
exercise suits than underwear. When you 
told them to do twenty-five situps, they did 
fifty. And, of course, they were the ones 
whose bodies were gawked at and envied. 
It had all grown out of the "shape-up" 
craze. Students were transforming their 
bodies left and right, bettering themselves. 
The short, the tall and the in-between were 
seen flocking toward the pointed towers of 
the Plex, the haven for those aiming toward 
lofty fitness goals. They had their totes in 
hand, minds in gear and were ready to roll. 
Emerging six weeks later, these once 
muscleless entities were new people, 
sporting new, slim-fitting clothes and 
refreshing smiles. We, in our baggy sweats, 
glared at their newly found selves as we 
passed by the Flex's hallowed doors. They 
glowed with their accomplishments while 
we cowered beneath our flab. 

So, soon, we too became part of the 
fitness craze, convinced that our entire 
image could be changed through a little 
physical pain and sweat. In aerobics classes, 
at the Plex or in our dorms, we felt "the 
burn." Our worn out sneakers pounded 
city streets. Our rackets sent numerous 
tennis balls flying. Any physical activity be- 
came acceptable and helpful. B.C. changed 
from an immobile, stagnant community to 
a campus bouncing with healthy, fit in- 
dividuals. Muscles were no longer confined 
to varsity athletes. The "common people" 
were moving in, and were soon to take over 
as the new physical wonders at B.C. 



/4my Seigentkaler 




240 Shape-up 



IjC 




\ 





Andy Ryan 



Sophomore Julie Lynch leads the 4:30 Aerobics class 
(left); Students enthusiastically follow (above); 
Nautilus and raquetball are student favorites at the 
Plex (opposite). 




^^ 



SluLpe-up 241 




Co-eds enjoy a Screw your Roommate Dance (above); 
Paul Young in concert (right); A ride on the scram- 
bler at Fall Fest (opposite,right); Live concert on 
campus (opposite,far right). 



242 UGBC Events 





This year's revised Fail Fest 
turned out to be a "Festival of 
Fun." A carnival seemingly 
appeared on B.C's lower campus over 
night, attracting enthusiastic, though 
few, supporters. Those who joined in the 
festivities, despite an incessant drizzle, 
were not disappointed as they reverted 
back to their childhood years, indulging 
in cotton candy and candied apples. 

The carnival rides, however, were not 
the only things swinging during UGBC's 
Fall Fest. A variety of international foods 
were sampled by willing students in 
Lyons cafeteria. There was also the 
NRBQ and the DelFuegos'concert, 
which kept the campus shaking long into 
the night. To those who braved the 
weather and joined the fun, the weekend 
proved to be a tremendous amount of 
food, fun and Fuegos. 

When Simon F opened for Paul 
Young on November 1, he began his 
performance by stating that, "A small 
number of people run the world and 
they are happy to keep it that way." Thus 
followed his heavy metal concert which 
was neither appreciated nor enjoyed by 
the majority of the audience. 

Paul Young's performance was a 



welcome contrast to this radical warm-up 
band. Young, the main attraction, 
wasted no time in creating a party atmos- 
phere in Roberts Center, delighting the 
enthusiastic audience, which was happy 
to find Young's performance well worth 
the long wait for tickets. Young was 
coerced, by their applause, into giving 
two encores. People soon forgot their 
disappointment with Simon F as they 
danced out the doors, praising Young's 
and UGBC's success. 

At the annual fall "Screw Your Room- 
mate," students, once ignorant of their 
intended dates, arrived at the student 
dining halls prepared to rock and roll. 
However, disappointing musical selec- 
tions discouraged their happy feet, and 
left many watching the large video 
screen upon which songs were visually 
displayed. Despite these problems with 
location and music, those who attended 
the dance still, to their surprise, had a 
blast, as they reunited with old high- 
school sweethearts, met long admired 
strangers or enjoyed the company of 
their best buddies. Hearts, instead of 
feet, danced the night away. 



Kerstin Gnazzo 





EVENTS 
EVENTS 
EVENTS 



UGBC Events 243 




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• ^v -M /^de shpes'and tap^^hpesvyese thiags . . 

• 1 of the past as RcebSksJ and jazz 
. *JL -.shoes hegaji. to adojrn dahcing,feet.' . ■ 
. AvP.C.-, the. Dajfee Ensemble.entered ifs 
eighth- season- jn the 1985-86 schooj year, • 
yfery ih tyhe^ to thg change* in dance, . 

TijeienjeiixBli?, which w^s*; directed by '. 
•Maiireen- MacFarlanie and •ad.fised by- -: 
^RobpEt VerEecke, S.J.; was a student jrun\ 
. opganizatit?!!. Through the creating; direC- - 

■ ting an.d"'<tpagning of various routines, 

■ menibers- of •tne,gr^p prepared -for their 
•'first per for ma'nyi.. •• ,. ■ - _„ 
; -"Moves," the t^st procluction of. the,;- 

•1:9^5-86 seasdri, was well jiainied, for it was ". 

• exeiri^qry df .the m^n,y different methods, 
ijiOtions and -movements .thajt. this yOung . 
*rouJ? of dancers, were able to dO- P^P 
.music such as Madonna's "Dress. You Up,"", 
ahd LTonelRitehie's. "Hello," chorused in ■ 
the background as "Students synchronized .. 

; their turjns', steps and leaps to the ixjusiC' .. 
Although .membership entailed an iti-'. 
twSe amount of practice, those-wbp partici- *' 
pated found it.rewafdirig a% tl>eijj?.stretched* * 

• ript Pnly their limBs^but aTst>.tBeir'talenf|, 

,' .* . -■-• ■■ ■- ■ " • ». . 

and s|jiritsj -.•- .... ' .• -i: . --y^ ■■ 



KSijth Gnazzo 




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Dance EnsernJ)!^ • . 245 






^ 



DEAJSrS 
AFTER 
DARK. . 




248 Deans After Dark 




In one important respect my 
fourteen years as president have ex- 
actly paralleled the class of 1986's 
experiences of its four years at 
Boston College. Years pass like days 
when you enjoy what you do and the 
people who form your community. 
May you find your BC wherever you 
go." 

-Fr. J. Donald Monan, SJ, President 



Fr. Monan 249 




"On a clear Sunday afternoon, I 
rocket down Lake Street to the 
Charles River Bike Path..., coast into 
the Esplanade... and curl up with a 
snappy title from the Dean's List..." 

-Fr. William Neenan, SJ, Dean of Arts and 
Sciences 



250 Dean Neenan 



"In my spare time I like to do things 
out of doors. I jog, occasionally run 
marathons, ride bikes, ski a lot — but 
not well. I enjoy backpacking, have a 
big interesting garden, and like to 
build furniture. Sometimes I read 
and write." 

-John J. Neuhauser, Dean of School of 
Management 




Dean Neuhauser 251 




"Since I was recently married, it be- 
came inevitable that my hobby 
would be writing thank you notes. I 
must say, I am enjoying the hobby 
immensely, but within a week or two 
I shall be ready for a new one." 

-Mary Griffin, Dean of School of Education 



252 Dean Griffin 



The opportunity to have much 
more free time to read is one of the 
many joys I look forward to as I 
anticipate my coming retirement." 

-Mary A. Dineen, Dean of School of Nursing 




Dean Dineen 253 



wsii' 




"My favorite hobby is playing black- 
jack, either in a casino or with 
friends. Blackjack is the only casino 
game in the world where the player 
can have a statistical advantage over 
the house. The game absorbs me 
and, because so many of the players 
are on vacation, it is played in a very 
relaxed atmosphere. Of course, it's 
even more fun when you win." 

-Fr. Joseph R. Fahey, SJ, Academic Vice 
President 



254 Fr. Fahey 



"Commencement- A time to reflect 
on four years of happy memories; a 
time to be grateful to parents for an 
education that will enable you to live 
meaningful and productive lives in 
the world of today." 




Fr. McGovern 255 





The most enjoyable part of my 
work is watching students grow over 
their four years at Boston College 
from wide-eyed anxious freshmen 
to mature, sophisticated seniors- 
ready to face life and the world as 
much richer and stronger persons 
than when they came." 

-Kevin Duffy, Vice President for Student 
Affairs 



256 Kn'i)i Duffy 



p 




"The endless pursuit of appreci- 
ating the human dignity of under- 
graduate students; this year will not 
be the end of my quest, nor the end 
of an era." 

-Fr. Edward J. Hanrahan, SJ, Dean of Students 




Fr. Hanrahan 257 




258 ('.<ill<'irr (,j Alt'. (Did Si w 



The College of 



ARTS & SCIENCES 




The College of Arts and Sciences (A&S) 
at Boston College had the title of being the 
oldest and largest of the four under- 
graduate schools. It had a very structured, 
yet very unstructured curriculiun. Students 
had the opportunity to follow a program 
which provided them exposure to both the 
major areas of liberal arts and one specific 
field. A number of electives could also be 
taken to suit their interest. A&S gave the 
students freedom to specialize as much or 
as little as possible. 

In order to graduate, a student had to 
pass thirty-eight one-semester courses, 
keeping in mind that thirty-two had to be 
taken in A&S. The other six could be taken 
in the other three schools. The normal 
course load for a full time student was five 
courses for the first six semesters, dropping 
to four courses for the senior year. In a 
sense, B.C.'s liberal arts education was 
three-fold. The first part of the curriculum 



was I he (^ore. 1 he 
ic(|uii ed core courses 
were I he dreaded 
lourieen. An A&S 
student had to take 
I w o English, two 
European History, 
two Philosophy, two 
Theology, two 
Natural Science, two 
Social Science, and 
iwo from the cluster 
of either two Mathe- 
matics or two Fine 
Arts or Speech 
(Communications and 
Theater. 

The search for a 
tolerable core course 
was usually long and 
tedious. The advice 
of experienced 
friends was sought 
for valuable tips. It 
was during the selec- 
tion process that the 
famous search for the 
"gut" was initiated. 
The moment of 
terror came upon the realization that this 
gut course wasn't such a picnic after all. 
Memories of Theology term papers, more 
than three hundred students crammed in 
Devlin 008 for biology, The Symposium, 
and geology classes haunt many A&S 
students. Sometimes came the startling 
surprise that some of these courses were 
actually interesting. RJ McMahon, a senior 
Economics major, stated, "If it weren't for 
the core, I wouldn't have taken Rhythm 
and Blues in America and French Literary 
Filmmakers. I was able to truly expand on 
the liberal arts education I received at B.C." 
The second part was the all important 
major. It was ten to twelve courses in a field 
in which a student wanted to specialize. 
More than twenty areas for specialized 
study were offered, leading to a Bachelor of 
Arts or Bachelor of Science degree such as: 
Biology, Chemistry, Classical Studies, 
Computer Science, Economics, English, 



Fine Arts, (ierrnanic Studies, History, 
Mathematics, Music, Fliiloso|jliy, Political 
Science, Psychology, Sociology, Speech 
Communications and Theolf)gy to name a 
few. This would provide students with 
sufficient information and exposure, so 
that they could prepare for a wide variety of 
careers. A student could choose two majors, 
but these had to meet the minimum 
requirement set by each specific depar- 
tment. 

The third part of a student's education 
consisted of electives or shall we call them 
guts. If a student did not take on a double 
major, he was left with twelve to fourteen 
electives. Some students took advantage of 
this and tried to take courses in as many 
different areas as possible. Students could 
learn more about Theology or take an in- 
teresting History of Boston course. The 
electives, on the other hand, served as the 
gut outlet. Seniors ran around during 
registration trying to find the right gut that 
fit in the perfect time slot. Among the more 
popular ones were: Future of Conscious, 
Contemporary Ethical Perspectives, 
History of Theater and Ideas of Insanity. 
Electives also gave students the chance to 
take at most six courses from the other 
schools. 

A&S had a number of academic 
programs to enrich a student's education. 
One of the demanding programs of study 
was the Honors Program. It was designed 
to provide new and imiovative courses to 
satisfy the talented students who were 
motivated and prepared. If a student 
wanted a challenge, he could apply to be a 
candidate for the Scholar of the College 
program in which a scholarly project would 
be done in his specialized field. 

Since A&S was very diverse, a student 
had to take great care in the selection of his 
core courses, his major and his electives. 
There was a staff of over four hundred and 
fifty faculty members to provide good 
advisement and adequate information of 
one's undergraduate education. 

— — Kerstin Gnazzo and Chris Botelho —^ 



College of Arts and Sciences 259 



The School of 



MANAGEMENT 



Otherwise known as the "School of 
Money," the School of Management had 
the reputation of being the most competi- 
tive school on campus. Students were 
educated in skills necessary to excel in the 
modern business world. After being ex- 
posed to a liberal arts and professional un- 
dergraduate education, SOM graduates 
could be found managing business, gover- 
nment, service and educational in- 
stituations as well as large corporations. An 
impressive number of students also went on 
to further their education by attending law 
school or pursing their MBA. 

Since there was so much competition 
when landing jobs in the business world, 
students at the undergraduate level felt 
pressure to excel in every aspect of their 
work. According to SOM students, there 
was a highly competitive atmosphere 
throughout their four years in the school. 
Senior Accounting major, Christine 
Lubanski thought that the competitive 
element was an asset. "Although it has been 
a very competitive four years, I have 
enjoyed the school immensely," she 
commented, "I feel that I am very prepared 
to be a career woman of the 80's." 

In order to produce effective managers 
and leaders in business, SOM attempted to 
inform the student about the social 
environment in which they would be 
working. The Boston College SOM filled 
the need to provide a professional business 
education based on broad knowledge 
rather than specialized training. This 
allowed students to effectively interact with 
clients and customers who were at the basis 
of business itself. "The School of 
Management has allowed me to develop the 
business skills that I will need while 
encouraging me not to forget that Boston 
College means dedication to Liberal Arts," 
said Andrew Kreshik, a senior with a con- 
centration in General Management. Both 
moral and ethical questions were involved 
when business decisions had to be made. A 
Jesuit education aided students in fulfilling 
their moral obligations in today's growing 
and changing society. 



To furnish stu- 
dents with a signifi- 
cant background in 
liberal arts, the study 
of English, history, 
mathematics, social 
sciences and the 
natural sciences was 
required. After these 
core courses were 
completed, students 
would then begin the 
management 
courses, which were 
taken sometime during their first three 
years at B.C. The purpose of the special 
management core was to develop a sound 
background knowledge of the basic con- 
cepts and processes of modern 
management. Usually during their junior 
year, students began to concentrate in a 
specific area of mangagement and then 
continued the sequence until graduation, 
according to the major's specific 
requirements. In SOM, students could 
choose to major in accounting, computer 
science, economics, finance, general 
management, marketing, organizational 
studies, human resources management and 
quantitative analysis. Of the thirty-eight 
courses required for graduation from 
SOM, fourteen had to be taken from the 
College of Arts and Sciences. The 
remainder included sixteen management 
courses, two liberal arts electives and six 
free electives. The curriculum was, there- 
fore, very broad in its scope. Students were 
urged to utilize their electives according to 
their own personal interests and their 
desire to develop certain skills. Foreign 
language exploration was also encouraged. 

The School of Management offered its 
undergraduate students the opportunity to 
integrate the study of management and 
psychology in a special concentration. 
Students could also complete a major in the 
College of Arts and Sciences by taking 
electives in a certain discipline. 

Involvement in extra-curricular activities 
was an important facet of SOM that 




encouraged student and faculty communi- 
cation and aided students in acquiring 
knowledge about their particular career 
fields. The SOM Senate was the official 
representative body of the undergraduate 
School of Management. Each class was 
represented by four elected officers in the 
Senate who strived to meet the academic 
and cultural needs of the student body. In- 
formation about career opportunities was 
available through the Accounting, Finance 
and Marketing Academies, the Economics 
Caucus and the Personnel Management 
Association. All of these organizations 
sponsored career nights, interview 
workshops, guest speakers and social 
events to enhance the student's job search 
and career planning. 

The SOM Honors Program offered ex- 
ceptional students an opportunity to 
develop professional skills and leadership 
ability. Throughout the program, a partici- 
pant had to maintain Dean's List grade 
point averages and actively plan and ex- 
ecute Program functions. The Loyola 
Lecture Series, sponsored by SOM each 
year, invited two national or international 
figures to discuss current topics, not only in 
the fields of business, but also in the 
humanities. The B.C. School of 
Management exposed students fo a multi- 
tude of disciplines providing for the 
personal and intellectual development of 
business ethics and practices. 



Tracey Wallisch 



260 Management 




Management 261 




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262 .Wursing 



The School of 



NURSING 



A Bachelor's Degree in the Boston 
College School of Nursing was obtained 
through the study of liberal arts and the 
study of the practice and theory of nursing. 
However, some unwritten requirements 
were necessary in order to suceed as a nurs- 
ing student. The 
program centered 
around the theory 
that nursing was a 
combination of many 
different disciplines - 
the biological and 
physical sciences, 
philosophy, theology 
and the social 
sciences. Through 
the exploration of 
these various realms 
of nursing, the B.C. 
nursing students 
would become sensi- 
tive to the needs of 
their future. 

The study of nurs- 
ing at Boston College 
involved work both in 
and outside of the 
classroom. The 
liberal arts, which 
were stressed during 
the first and second 
years, provided a basis for the subsequent 
study of nursing. It was during this time 
that students explored areas of interest, 
making sure that nursing was their true 
vocation. Fulfilling the core liberal arts 
courses also gave the nursing student a 
chance to attend classes with non-nursing 
majors. After their first few years of 
college, the students rarely got this oppor- 
tunity due to concentrated and specialized 
curriculums. 

The third and fourth years of B.C.'s four 
year nursing program emphasized the 
clinical aspects of the nursing experience. 
Each class was divided into two plans to 
facilitate the clinical process - Plan A and 
Plan B. Students in Plan B began clinical 
work in the second semester of the sopho- 
more year while those in Plan A began their 
first semester of junior year. The first plan 
completed the nursing curriculum one 
semester before the other plan. 




Clinical experience was usually gained 
two or three days a week. There were 
approximately fifty hospitals and health 
care agencies in the Boston area that 
enabled students to gain the invaluable ex- 
perience of working in a health care facility. 
Each student was 
assigned a SON 
faculty member to 
guide and counsel 
them throughout this 
period. 

After freshman 
and sophomore years 
spent completing, 
along with the core 
courses. Chemistry, 
Anatomy and Physi- 
ology, Microbiology, 
and Pathophysiol- 
ogy, students were 
ready to embark 
upon the clinical 
nursing courses. The 
central concern of 
these courses was that 
of promoting health 
through preventive 
intervention at three 
different levels : 
primary, secondary 
and tertiary. 
The study of primary preventive inter- 
vention followed the notion that the health 
problems could be avoided by practicing a 
first line of defense, that of prevention. 
Students were taught to recognize the 
symptoms of various illnesses, to differen- 
tiate between what was healthy and what 
was not, and to put to use their knowledge 
of necessary interventions. Students 
practiced these skills in community settings, 
such as healthy individual and family units. 
Secondary preventive intervention con- 
centrated more upon the practices that 
were necessary once it had been established 
that a patient had an acute health problem. 
Here, the student was called upon to serve 
the needs of the ill pafient. Clinical ex- 
perience called for the identification of 
certain health problems and the knowledge 
to prescribe the proper interventions. This 
was done in maternity, child health, mental 
health, and medical-surgical surroundings. 



(3ne of the final courses taken in SON 
was Tertiary Preventive Intervention 
which taught the techniques necessary in 
caring for patients and their families. At 
this level, the students learned rehabilita- 
tion skills that would help an individual 
achieve his optimum level of functioning. 

Both individuals and groups were viewed 
at all these developmental stages so that the 
future nurse could acquire the proper 
knowledge, skills and attitudes at that level. 
The clinical groups were made up of 
approximately seven people, making it 
possible for students to know fellow 
students and faculty members very well. 
Senior nursing student, Susan Evans, 
commented on the highly respected clinical 
placements, "We've been very fortunate to 
be affiliated with the reputable hospitals in 
the Boston area such as Beth Israel, 
Children's and Mass General. These teach- 
ing hospitals provide the maximum learn- 
ing experience." 

The clinical rotations not only took place 
at impressive hospitals but were also 
diverse. "I still remember the anxiety I felt 
when I was assigned to my very first patient 
sophomore year," says senior nursing 
student, Nancy Connors, "Now, looking 
back at various experiences such as assisting 
in the delivery of a baby, caring for acutely 
ill surgical patients and interacting with 
psychiatric clients, I realize the value of the 
B.C. Nursing program and how much I've 
grown from it." 

A B.C. Nursing education, with all its 
clinical applications, tended to be time con- 
suming and rigorous. "To pursue a nursing 
career, there are sacrifices that must be 
made. One often has to give up Thursday 
night at the Rat due to long care plans and 
the requirement of arriving at the hospital a 
7 a.m.," said Senior nursing student, Tricia 
Casey, " The lack of guys in classes and the 
sight of the same faces year after year tend 
to make every class routine, but it's been 
worth it." After graduation. Nursing 
students passed their state boards in order 
to become registered nurses. Then, they 
were off to practice the vocation to which, 
for the past four years, they had aspired. 



Tracey Wallisch 



Nursing 263 



The School of 



EDUCATION 



To be an education 
major at Boston 
College meant 
having a strong 
devotion to educa- 
tion and/or human 
services. Students 
might choose to 
major in Early Child- 
hood Education, 
Elementary Educa- 
tion, Middle School 
Education, Second- 
ary School Educa- 
tion, Special Educa- 
tion, Severe Special 
Education or Human 
Development. Many 
specialized fields 
were offered within these majors such 
as Bilingual Education, Computer Usage, 
Gifted Child, Mathematics, Reading, 
Speech Science, and Media and Fine Arts. 

SOE students received a strong liberal 
arts background and the necessary 
teaching skills to prepare students for 
professional teaching postions. SOE 
required that students complete the 
University Core Curriculum by taking two 
courses in English, Math or Natural 
Sciences, Philosophy, Theology, European 
History and the Social Sciences. It was 
recommended that these courses were 
completed during the first two years of 
study, leaving adequate time to complete a 
major field of study, a minor field, and a 
few electives. A student's minor was made 
up of four to six courses in the College of 
Arts and Sciences and was usually executed 
during the sophomore year. 

Students in the various programs that 
SOE offered could have opted for a five 
year course of study leading to a Bachelor 
of Arts degree and a Masters degree. These 
programs included Special Education, 
Higher Education and Educational 
Technology. There was a close-knit 
relationship between students and faculty 
in SOE. Freshmen had weekly meetings 
with their advisors in their first semester at 
B.C. Faculty taught both at the under- 
graduate and graduate levels. Many were 
engaged in research projects and a good 
number had p.ublish€;d their observations 
in their field of education. ' 




A very rewarding aspect of education at 
B.C. was working with special needs 
children. B.C. had its own Campus School 
for Exceptional Children. There were two 
levels of handicapped children from which 
students could choose to work — moderate 
special needs and severe special needs. 
Students in the first program learned to 
teach children with mild to moderate 
learning disabilities. The Campus School 
and public school field work were the 
settings for field practicisms that began in 
the sophomore year. The severe special 
needs program was designed for severely 
retarded or emotionally disturbed 
children. Course work was integrated with 
appropriate field experiences, including a 
full-time student teaching assignment in 
senior year. 

The Boston College Campus School was 
a day school for handicapped children and 
young adults. The fact that this school was 
in a university setting was a positive aspect 
because of its access to the university staff, 
students in training and volunteers. The 
Campus School offered one on one 
learning settings to its students because of 
the volunteer involvement of Boston 
College students. It was not an uncommon 
sight to see B.C. education majors working 
with their handicapped students around 
campus. The Campus School was a unique 
learning experience which benefitted all 
those involved because of its individualistic 
and energetic approach to teaching. 

Most B.C. education majors student 



taught during their 
junior and senior 
years. The knowl- 
edge gained while 
student teaching was 
valuable because 
it was the type of 
education which one 
could not get from a 
textbook or in a class- 
room setting. Stu- 
dents applied for 
student teaching 
positions in the 
sophomore year and, 
if accepted, they 
reported to their 
placements one day a 
week both semesters 
junior year. First semester senior year, stu- 
dent teachers took one course at B.C. and 
spent the rest of their time out in the field 
full-time. Field placements coordinated 
with the students major and occurred in 
educational facilities in the Boston area. 
Seniors had the opportunity to student 
teach in one of ten foreign countries or 
another state. 

One of the outstanding characteristics of 
SOE was its excellent advisement program. 
Faculty advisors not only assisted students 
in choosing programs, they also made it a 
point to see that students came to them 
whenever they needed any career or 
counseling advice. Mark Scheel, a junior 
Secondary Education and Math major, 
said, "Advisement in the School of Educa- 
tion is great. They come to you and help 
you, you don't have to go to them." This 
created the ideal student and faculty 
repore. The advisors and professors really 
looked out for their students' best interests 
and career goals. 

SOE was accredited by the National 
Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education and by the Interstate Certifica- 
tion Compact. Nearly all SOE graduates 
found teaching employment or went on to 
graduate programs. The Boston College 
School of Education prided itself on educa- 
ting future teachers according to the values 
of the Jesuit traditions here at B.C. 



i 



Tracey Wallisch 



264 Education 




Education 265 




266 Jesuits 



JESUIT TRADITION 

"Contemplatio en actione." 




(-I.X. (>lavc-i, Loyala, Xavici. I hey were 
only the names ot a some dorms on Upper 
Campus. Or were they? Whal did ihose 
three letters stand for? Why were they so 
important that d(jrms should have been 
named after them? 

We begin with Loyola, that is, St. Ignatius 
Loyola. He became, in 1 52 L the founder of 
the Jesuits. St. Francis Xavier was a 
personal friend of Loyola and a significant 
follower of his. Another renowned Jesuit 
was St. Peter Claver, who eased the plight of 
the African slaves. 

Almost 500 years later, the Jesuit tradi- 
tion continued, with 26,000 members 
throughout the world. It was the largest 
religious order of the Roman Catholic 
Church, boasting twenty-eight Jesuit 
universities in the United States alone. At 
B.C., the Society of Jesus flourished, as 
there were 1 15 Jesuits in residence. 

In the university itself, forty Jesuits were 
full-time professors, in comparison to 573 
lay teachers. Would the Jesuit tradition 
continue at Boston College? 

Father Monan, President of the 
University, offered his answer to this cru- 
cial question: "Since there are high, 
rigorous standards for faculty, research 
work and students, student life and policy, 
all are sufficed with a spirit of mutual 
respect, helpfulness and cooperation - a 
manifestation of Christian charity." For his 
sake and that of the students, it was hoped 
that these aspirations would be fulfilled. 



Keith Gnazzo 



Jesuits 267 



REQUIREMENTS 



The Core of a BC Education 



Boston College conferred academic 
degrees through the College of Arts and 
Sciences, the School of Management, the 
School of Nursing and the School of Educa- 
tion only after students had taken courses 
from a Core curriculum, as well as from 
their major courses of study. These Core 
courses were intended to provide the 
cultural background, intellectual training 
and structure of basic principles by which 
students could comprehend a complex 
world and cope with rapid changes as they 
occurred. Usually completed during the 
Freshman and Sophomore years, there 
were different Core courses required in 
each school. 

For students in the College of Arts and 
Sciences, it was necessary that they took two 
courses each in English, European History, 
Philosophy, Theology, Natural Science and 
Social Science. Two courses in Mathematics 
or one course each in Fine Arts and in 
Speech Communication and Theatre were 
also required. This highly diverse group of 
classes coincided with the liberal arts tradi- 
tion at B.C. Due to the many course 
offerings in A & S, students were advised to 
exercise care in the selection of their Core 
curriculum. When the correct and appli- 
cable choices were made, it furnished a 
sufficient breadth of information and ex- 
posure to methods of inquiry, so that the 
student could effectively prepare for any 
one of a wide variety of careers, perhaps 
one not foreseen while in college. 

In the School of Education, students had 
to complete University Core requirements 
while also following a program of study in 
their selected majors. Therefore, two 
courses each in European History, Philo- 
sophy, Theology, Social Sciences and 
English were required. Also necessary were 
two courses in either Natural Sciences or 
Mathematics. These courses, like those 
required in Arts and Sciences, were in- 
tended to assist the majors in their specific 
educational fields. 

Within the thirty-eight courses required 
for the Bachelor of Science degree in the 
School of Management, fourteen of these 
were from the Core curriculum. Students 
were advised to arrange their courses in 
sequence according to their field of con- 
centration in consultation with a faculty 
advisor. In the Freshman year, two English, 



Philosophy, Natural 
Science and Euro- 
pean History courses 
were taken. Calculus 
for Management 
Science was the 
necessary course for 
fulfilling the Mathe- 
matics core. During 
the Sophomore year, 
the required Theo- 
logy core was taken. 
It was necessary that 
Core courses were 
completed, in the 
School of Manage- 
ment, by the Junior 
year. 

The study of 
nursing was based 
upon the student's 
knowledge of the 
liberal arts and 
sciences and the 
development of 
knowledge rooted in 
the bio-physical, 
philosophical, theological and psycho- 
social sciences. Accordingly, students 
studied the accumulated knowledge of the 
person and the universe along with other 
students at the University. The Core 
courses required for the School of Nursing 
were two each in Theology, Philosophy, 
Social Science, European History, Natural 
Sciences and English. These liberal arts 
subjects were emphasized in the first and 
most of the second year, and it was 
suggested that the history, philosophy and 
English Core requirements be taken in the 
freshman year since they were two- 
semester courses. 

Compared to most other Universities' 
core curriculums, Boston College had two 
unique requirements. In all four schools of 
Boston College, both Theology and Philo- 
sophy had to be taken in order to graduate. 
These were necessary requirements due 
mainly to the Jesuit tradition upon which 
B.C. was charted. 

Theology, the academic discipline con- 
cerned with religious faith and with the 
traditions of belief and worship that in- 
formed the life of communities of faith, was 
necessary in fostering awareness of 




religious roots and 
background of our 
culture. It also served 
as the groundwork 
for moral decisions, 
an important factor 
in any field of study 
or career. Students 
could either take two 
three-credit courses, 
a two semester 
sequence course or 
twelve-credit courses. 
The twelve-credit 
courses fulfilled both 
the Theology and 
Philosophy Cores. 

Aside from these 
twelve-credit courses, 
the Philosophy major 
could also be fulfilled 
through two three- 
credit courses or a 
two semester se- 
quence course. 
Required to provide 
the opportunity for 
open-ended inquiry and reflection on the 
most basic questions that concern man and 
the ultimate dimensions of his world, the 
Philosophy core allowed for study of Ethics 
and of Philosophy of the Person. The Jesuit 
tradition had always encouraged the quest 
for a more complete understanding of 
questions concerning the existance of man. 
The thoughts of such philosophers as Plato 
and Aristotle were extensively studied in 
these core courses, so that the student could 
draw his own conclusions concerning 
moral, ethical and philosophical questions 
of this age. 

In attending this Jesuit institution, there- 
fore, the students got basic, well-rounded 
Liberal Arts backgrounds before more 
deeply exploring their own concentrated 
fields of study. Included in this core were 
courses in Philosophy and Theology, 
making it necessary that the student ex- 
plore, along with career-oriented subjects, 
those topics which dealt with the 
development of mental and spiritual well- 
being. 



Amy Seigenthaler 



268 Core Requirements 




^-^ 









1(1- 



i-ill'.' 



Se>- 



..J 'f 








Core Requirements 269 




270 (Computers 



COMPUTERS 



A New (feneration at BC 




The lights were 
dim. The corridor, 
spooky. The carrols 
were clean, all termi- 
nals shut off. But, 
something was dif- 
ferent this Saturday 
morning. There was 
a hole in the glass wall 
and the brand new 
Laser printer was 
gone. 

What was a laser 
printer, you ask? It 
was a letter quality 
printer for a Mac. 
Well, that explained 
part of it, but how 
could a red, round, delicious apple have a 
printer. Wasn't an apple something you ate 
as a snack or part of a meal? 

Well, not any more. These days, the 
apple's meaning had changed. People no 
longer thought of it in fruity terms. It had 
taken on a whole new dimension. Now an 
Apple was an electronic computer in which 
one could type papers, create programs, 
jjlay games and paint pictures. 

So what was so strange about this laser 
writer being stolen? Well, for one small 
|)iece of machinery, it was expensive, 
$."),60() worth. It wasn't something the 
average student could run to the store and 




Bill Russell 

buy. It was a privilege that many students 
enjoyed. 

In fact, so many people enjoyed the 
privileges of the computer room that it was 
not a very pleasant place to be this past 
school year, since there were not enough 
computers to go around. So, often students 
went out and spent $1,260 for their own 
personal Mac. It saved them plenty of 
aggrevation, headaches and heartaches. It 
was a small price to pay for such a 
worthwhile investment. 



Kerstin Gnazzo 



Computers 271 



O'NEILL LIBRARY 

The place to study, sleep, socialize . . . 



As a school grows, so do its integral parts. 
Beginning in 1863, as an all-male institu- 
tion, Boston College progressively ex- 
panded, eventually becoming co-educa- 
tional. With this continual increase in enrol- 
lment, eventually Bapst Library no longer 
had adequate space for the students and, in 
1984, a necessary addition to the Boston 
College campus was made. "Tip's Place" be- 
came a reality as the Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. 
Library claimed its spot on the side of 
Chestnut Hill. It was renowned as one of 
the best college libraries in the area and one 
of the largest in the nation. 

With 750,000 volumes in its hold, the 
O'Neill library was well-equipped for meet- 
ing the demands of the B.C. student. The 
only complaints about the library con- 
cerned space. There were not enough 
study areas to accomodate the many 
students who frequented this edifice. 
Nevertheless, the library had expanded, as 
had the university. 



Amy Seigenthaler 





272 O-Neill 




O'Neill 273 



U:.-»' 



v'X,. Jl', .» :••••, 



■'>•.> 











fi 



f 



> 




^ 



ROBERT M. 
ABRAHAMSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



LYNETTE A. 

ACCOMANDO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 



RENE A. ACOSTA 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



PAULC. AFONSO 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



MICHAEL J. ACOCLIA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 

Philosophy 




LAURA M. ACOSTINO 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



MELODY ACUDA 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



BARNEY J. ACUCUARO 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



CAILM. AKILLIAN 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



CHRISTOPHER E. 

ALAIMO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Pohtical Science 




KRISTY ALBRECHT 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



DONNA M. ALCOTT 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 
Communications 



PEDRODE ALDREY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Studio & Fine Arts 



SUSAN M. ALFA NO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



JOHN M. ALJIAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 








PETER ALLEN 

School of Management 

B.S. Economics 



ROBERT J. ALONSO 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



JULIE A. ALVAREZ 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



LORI A. ALVAREZ 

Arls & Sciences 

B.A. Philosophy 

Economics 



PABLO A. ALVAREZ 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



278 Friends 




Girls of Hardey 3rd '82-'83 



Coming to town 

Wcl(()iiie Freshmen! You are the 
vaiif^Liard of the '8()'s. Rev(jluLion, rot, 
and inthlessness have been exchanged 
lor all iuidc. So your path is stripped and 
your future clothed. They'll point you 
there, you'll go here and all the time 
you'll wonder if anyone saw you looking 
so lost. By itself, B.C. is (jnly tinder, 
shrubs, and Jesuits — but if you use your 
imagination and commit yourself to an 
ellorl, the place will come alive and a 
community will appear before your eyes. 

A good reason to be at B.(>. is the prox- 
imity of Boston and Cambridge. What 
you can't get in class you may find hitting 
the neon lit pavement or calling you 
from the Heights. And yes, there are 
more people helping to make B.C. the 
fine institution it is besides the students 
on your floor. You will never know your 
interests are shared unless you knock on 
some open doors and join the activities. 

September 12, 1982 




MARYM. ALVORD 
Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Political Science 



MARYAN AMARAL 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ELAINE L. AMBROSE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 



JULIE L. AMBROSE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 
Communications 



LISA A. AMENDOLA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 





ANN T. AMSLER 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 

English 



TERI ANDERHOLM 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JOHN R. ANDERSON 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theology 
Political Science 



LESLIE E. ANDERSON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Philosophy 

Psychology 



JOSE R. ANDRADE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



Friends 279 



Maybe I'll stay after all 

I am standing in a 'dustbowl"? I 
could swear I don't see one speck of 
dust. As a matter of fact, it's not on 
this damn UGBC map at all. Better 
concentrate on shelter. Got to get 
to my room, it has to be a safe place. 
But, how in God's name will I know 
a "Kostka" when I see one? 

At top speed I made my way 
across College Road up the stairs 
until I hit flat ground. Oh my God, 
there it is — a Kostka!! 

Not five minutes had passed 
when I heard a knock. I opened the 
door — it was not a pretty sight. 
"Hi, I'm your roommate Troy," he 
said in a prepubescent voice. 

The stereotvpe was complete — 



coke bottle glasses, greasy hair, and 
a TI-55 looped neady on his belt. 
He quickly inspected the room and 
then made a haste to the family sta- 
tion wagon. "That's it," I sullenly 
fumbled. "I've made the wrong 
decision." Dejected and in tears, I 
turned away to return to my room 
only to be stopped by a soft hand on 
my shoulder and a gentle voice. 
"Hi, my name is Suzy! Would you 
like to come upstairs to my room to 
use the phone?" As the smile 
spread across my face, I said, 
"sure," and followed her. "What 
the hell," I thought, "Maybe I'll stay 
just a few days after all." 

Sept#ii(^%iil982 




Louis Mastinano, Mike Icarino, Tony McCants, Jack Dadlani 
Alvarez, Bob Boroff 



Pablo 




USA J. ANDREACCI 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



WILLIAM ANDRESON 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



i 


f% 


\ 




1 


^ 


\ 


i 1. 




m 



JAYNE ANDREWS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JEAN C. ANDRYSIAK 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 




DIANNE M. ANESTIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



THEODORE L ANCELUS 

School of Management j 

B.S. General Mgmt. I 




mkd. 




STEVEN R. ANNESE ROBERT J. ANTHONY ANTONIO M. ANTUNES 



School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Computer .Science 



.•\rt.s & .Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Pre-Med 



Arts Ac .Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JULIE A. APPLEBY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance 

Language 

Economics 



STEVEN R. ARAUJO 
.■\ris & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



280 Friends 



CHRISTINE M. 


HALEH ARMIAN 


RAYMOND F. 


JEFFREY S. ARN 


ARELLANO 


ScliodI ol M.in.if^cincnt 


ARMSTRONG 


Art.s & Sciences 


School ol Manaf,fcment 


B.S. Maikcliiig 


School of Manaffcmcnl 


U.A. Ilislory 


B.S. Ktonomics 




B.S. Accounting 





Si liDol of .Mariagcnicnl 
B.S. Markcling 




ELIZABETH A. AS AM 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 

Mathematics 



SORAYAJ. ASSEFI 

School of Management 

B.S. Quantitative Analysis 

Finance 



KENNETH ASTARITA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 



CRAIG M. AUDET 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



GILBERT AVI LES 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 





BARBARA L. AYOTTE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



SANDRA M. AZZALINA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



STEVEN AZZOLINI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JEFFREY O. AZZOTO 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



JEANMARIE BADAR 

School of Education 

B.A. Elem-Special Education 




JANINE M. BAGGET 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Biology 

Computer Science 



ROBERT BAGGETT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



CYNTHIA A. BAILEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DAVID I. BAILEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



JEAN H. BAKER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



Friends 281 



RICHARD W. BAKER 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Marketing 



CYNTHIA A. BALFE 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



SHEILA A. BALOC 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



BRUCE J. BALON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



GARY L. BANOUN 

School of Management 

BS Business Management 




DONALD J. BAPTISTE 
Arts Sc Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



SUSAN L. BARBROW 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



MARGARET M. BARRETT STEPHEN J. BARRETT 
Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Psychology B.A. Political Science 



THOMAS A. BARRETT 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 




MICHAEL F. BARRON 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



STEVEN J. BARRON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



PETER J. BARTELME 

Arts Sc Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Political Science 



DAVID F. BATES 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DEBORAH E. BATOG 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

American Studies Minor 




WILLIAM G. BATTAILE 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CHRISTINE BAUSEO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Social Sciences 



CHRISTOPHER L BAXTER CHARLENE S. BAZARIAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political 

Science 



School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 



VITAS A. BAZIKAS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



282 Friends 



ALLISON R. BEAULIEU 

School ol MaiiaKc'iiii'nt 

B.S. Computer Science 

Management 



MAUREEN BEAVEN 

School of Managcniciil 
B.S. Business Management 



RICHARD M. BECK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Kcononiics 
Communications 



MARGARET E. BECKER 

Aiis & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



DRAKE C. BEHRAKIS 

.Sdiool ol Managt;iiicnl 
B.S. Finance 




KENNETH S. BELL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



PETER W. BELL 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



MARY R. BELLAMY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

French 



PAULETTE L. BELLIVEAU 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



DAVID P. BELTRAMI N I 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 




PETER C. BELVAL 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Finance 



MARK J. BENJAMIN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 




MARCIA L. BENNETT 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



RECINA M. BENNETT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



f 




Michael Degnan, Keith Seely, Mark Gowetski 



National Champs Come 
From Behind to Tie B.C. 

The novel would read like this: 
"The referee hesitated for a mo- 
ment, almost in disbelief, as the 
chip shot went astray. Then came 
the "no good" signal from the back 
judge and with it the eruption on 
the Boston College sideline." 



That's how the story would go 
and that's how it did this past 
Saturday afternoon as Clemson's 
place-kicker Donald Igwebuike 
missed a 43-yard field goal with just 
eight seconds left in the game to 
help the Eagles escape from hella- 
cious Death Valley with a 17-17 tie. 

Septem]3aptel982 



Friends 283 



PATRICK C. BENNISON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 



RICHARD P. BENOIT 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



NANCY JEAN A. 

BERARDO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

English 



LEA C. BERES 

School ol Education 

B.A. Secondary Education 

Communications 




Ellen Brown, Louise Wies, Sue Santa Maria 



Eagle's Nest Offers 
Trial Period for Breakfast 

The lack of students purchasing the three 
point unlimited breakfast at McElroy, plus the 
crowded situation at Lyons and at the 10:00 am 
Eagle's Next opening instigated the Dining 
Service Committee to test the student market for 
a new breakfast format. 

The jiew format will begin on a trial basis 
today, October 18. 

Ever since the McElroy unlimited breakfast in- 
creased from two to three points this year the 
amount of people purchasing it has decreased. 
The average attendance is only about 200 



people, according to McElroy area manager 
John Cowden. 

An added justification for the new breakfast 
plan is the wasted student money on unutilized 
labor. There are so few people eating at McElroy, 
according to Cowden, that there is litde work for 
the labor. As Dining Service Director John 
Callahan, put it, "Every dollar we spend is from 
the student funds." 

The joint opening of both eating facilities is 
only for a trial basis to see which style the 
students desire more: the a la carte plan at 
Eagle's Nest or the unlimited meal at McElroy. 

Octobet^S, 1982 



PATRICIA J. BERG 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 










SUSAN C. BERG IN 
School of Management 




RICHARD BERGSTROM 

School of Management 

B.S. General Management 




THOMAS P. BERGWALL 

School ol Management 

B.S. Finance 



284 Friends 



LAURI L. &ERKENKAMP 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



PAMELA J. BERRY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



DENNIS C. BERTRON 
Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 
Communications 



JUDITH A. BETHONEY 

School ol Maiiaf^etiient 
B.S. Marketing 



SALVATORE L. 
B/ANCARDI 
Arts & .Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




WENDY S. BICKNELL 

School of Education 
B.A. Elem-Special Education 



CYNTHIA A. BIEMER JAMES E. BILODEAU JR. 

School of Education Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Human Development B.A. Economics 




JOEL A. BIN AM IRA 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance Marketing 



ANGELA F. BINDA 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Studio Art 




MICHAEL W. BINNEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



WILLIAM D. BISHOP 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



JO ANN BISZANTZ 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JOHN F. BITZAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KARI R. BLACK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




KATHLEEN A. BLAKE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 
Psychology 



VIVIEN NE A. BLAKE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ROBERTA M. BLAZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



DANIEL S. BLECK 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Economics 



KIM M. BLETZER 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



Friends 285 




KEVIN £. BLISS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JOHN D. BLOMaUIST 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



MARY JEAN BLOOD 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



SARA A. BLOOM 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KATHLEEN A. BLOUIN 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 




JAMES D. BLUE 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



TERESA BOBADILLA 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Art History 



RUTA K. BOBELIS 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



HENDRICUS F. BOCXE 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



KAREN M. BOCAN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 




DAVID P. BOKHOUR 

Atis 8c Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 



PATRICIA A. BOKSANSKI 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



CAROLYN M. BOLDRY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



STEPHEN J. BOLCER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 



LISA A. BO NAD I ES 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Computer Science 




JONATHAN A. BON I 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Psychology 

.Marketing 



KATHLEEN S. BOO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



ANN M. BOOTH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



BARBARA J. BORDNER 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



MARY BETH BORC 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



286 Friends 




Ken Astorita, Don Turner, Maria Young, Steve Trezza, Wendy Case, Marie Callaghan, Lisa Kwasniowski, Tim Tully, Maureen 
Murphy, Rob Martinez, Patty O'Brien 



Kennedy and Shamie 
Square Off at BC 

Enter the challenger — businessman, inventor, republican — 
Raymond Shamie. He is obviously prepared, combat ready, 
bearing an arsenal of facts, voting records, endorsements, and 
quotes — more information on the Senator than the Senator 
had on himself. A nervous silence hung over the theatre as 
Shamie tenaciously arranged himself behind the barrage of 
specifically categorized binders and notebooks, preparing 
Kennedy's own book 'Treeze" as prime ammunition. 

Enter the incumbent — national figure, political legacy, 
democrat, Edward Kennedy — minutes before the camera's 
started rolling, and apparently unaware of the salvo armed and 
ready to be leveled against him, but obviously armed himself, 
with time-tested confidence and the conspicious applause from 



his family, occupying the entire third row of the middle section. 
These roles of conservative republican businessman vs. liberal 
democrat politician, now firmly implanted in the minds of 
Massachusetts voters and politicians, were evident in this long- 
awaited Kennedy-Shamie debate, held last night in our own 
theatre arts complex. The audience, muted by the explicit in- 
structions of the moderator in this made-for-television debate, 
consisted of the grey-suited Shamie followers, blue blazered, 
loafer clad Kennedy devotees as well as journalists from all 
across the globe representing over two hundreds media organi- 
zations. All converged on the Heights to witness the most recent 
of David's attempts to defeat the Massachusetts Goliath. 

October 25, l'.)82 




LINDA L. BORMAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ROBERT S. BOROFF 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KELLY D. BORSODI 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



DEBORAH J. BORSOS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



JOHN W. BOSA 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



Friends 287 



DAVID F. BOSTICK 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JOHN S. BOSWELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



CHRISTOPHER BOTSOLIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




T-Sl St 




^k 




TIMOTHY H. BOUCHARD WILFRID P. BOUDREAU 
Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Political Science B.A. EngHsh 

Communications 




LINDA M. BOULEY 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 



KAREN A. BOURKE 

School of Education 

B.A. Elem-Special Education 




DANIEL J. BOUVIER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Philosophy 

Psychology 



DOUGLAS M. BOWEN 
Arts & .Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



LOUISE C. BOTTOMLEY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



ELIZABETH A. 

BOUCHARD 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



n P- ^ 




Tara Glackin, Suzy Welch, Amy Glackin, Billy Carew, Mark Glackin, 
Kathleen Dinn, Rose Ann Foppiani, Eleanor Gaffney, Danielle Bruni 



Tailgate Kegs 
Hanrahan Seeks to Ban 

At last week's Rutgers game, 
flyers were distributed by the 
Athletic Department among the 
tailgates on Lower Campus stating, 
"Kegs of beer will not be permitted 
at future games." The flyer warned 
that if "fans cannot moderate their 
pre-game festivities we (the 
University) will be forced to restrict 
the use of alcohol." 

It is possible that the ban will go 
into effect within the week. Dean of 
Students Edward Hanrahan, SJ, in 
response to the flyer, has 
recommended a new policy on 
tailgating to the Athletic Depart- 



ment. The recommended policy 
has also been endorsed by Director 
of Housing Richard Collins and 
Campus Police Chief Kenneth 
Watson, according to Hanrahan. 

This policy supports last week's 
flyer, and a definite decision will be 
reached when the Athletic 
Advisory Board receives the 
recommendation from the Athletic 
Department early this week. 
Hanrahan's request primarily con- 
cerns the banning of kegs at 
tailgates. "I am strongly deter- 
mined to have the keg ban go into 
effect as soon as possible," stated 
Hanrahan. 

October 25, 1985 



288 Friends 



CHERYL A. BOWES 

Scliool ol Niii'.siiig 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY C. BOWKER 

Arts X: Silciufs 

B.A. Romance 

Languages 



BRUCE T. BOYARSKY 

Alls & Sdences 
B.A. Economics 



TIMOTHY BOYCE 

S<li(i(]| ol .M.uiagemciu 

B..S. Maikeling 

Theology 



HELEN N. BOYLE 

,\ris & .Sciences 
B.A. English 




PETER M. BRACCIOTTI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



ROBERT E. BRADLEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



COLLEEN ANN BRADY 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



PETER F. BRADY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



ROSEMARY BRADY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 





JILL A. BRAG A 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



MARY C. BRALLA 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 



MARIE E. BRANS FIELD 

School of Education 
B.A. Elem-Special Education 



FELICIA C. BREHM 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



IRENE BREMIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




DAVID J. BRENNAN 

.S( hool of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



ELIZABETH M. 

BRENNAN 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development 



GREGORY C. BRENNAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CATHERINE E. 

BRENNAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Psychology 

Economics 



MICHAEL J. BRENNAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



Friends 289 



MYRIAM BRETON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



DONNA J. BREZINSKI 

Alls &: Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



DAVID L. BRICKER 

Arts it Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JENNIFER M. BRILL 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



CECIL B. BRODERICK 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 




JA/ViES L. BROMLEY 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

History 



KAREN M. BROUCHTON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



DOUGLAS A. BROWN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 



ELLEN BROWN 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



ERIN M. BROWN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




JAMES BROWN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KEVIN P. BRUEN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 



ELIZABETH E. BRUEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Romance Languages 



DANIELLE J. BRUNI THERESA M. BRUNNICK 
School of Nursing Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Nursing B.A. English 





CORRI A. BRUNO 

School of Mauagement 
B.S. Human Resources Mgmnl. 



FRANCIS X. BRUTON 

.^rls ik Sciences 

B.A. English 

Philosophy 



MARK J. BUCCERI 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 

Mathematics 



CHRISTINE M. BUCCI AIMEE BUCCIARELLI 



.Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



.■\rls \: Sciences 
B.A. English 




ROBERT p. BUCK 

School ol ManagciiKiu 

B.S. Accounting 

Computer Science 





STEVEN H. 
BUCKINGHAM 

School of Management 

B.S. Economics 

Marketing 











w 


^.^^ 




Past, Present and Future 


V 


gpv^ 


of Boston College 




Pi/^I^M^ n 




riic Heights: Raising iuncls for the 






University has ottujiied much of 


^tB^t^^^^^K^ ' 


^ -^ii^ ^p* ^ ^k 




your time in the past ten years a.s 




^^ fli^ .^^^ 




[jresident. How do you plan to con- 


' / It mX 


Bk^ ^^^^^ ^HPI 




tinue to raise ifie end(jwinent and 




^(k^ 




thus, ensure li.C.'s financial security 
for the future? 

The Heights: The academic 
reputation of the University has 
grown, and continues to grow. 




«^K^ i^^^B'^"- 




Several departments are nationally 


■ ^^^^L _^m^ 




reknowned. Along the same lines, our 




** ^^^^^^^^Hk |K - ^^^^^^^^^K^ 




athletic program is finally achiev- 


r ^T 


" ' ^^^^^^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




ing consistent national recognition. 
Can you explain the priorities of the 


^ ^^^H^H^^^^^^Ki 


'^^^■M > ^^^K^^^M 




University then, in light of the fact 








that over 150 athletic scholarships 








are awarded each year and no full 






academic scholarships exist? 

November 1, 1982 


:2^^L 9 


W^^L // f ^ 






Tom BergwalKJeiil^ 


Jorgan, Steve Fox, Ted Williams, Nick 




Con fort i 






JOHN F. BUCKLEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 

Human Resources Mgmnt. 



JUDITH M. BUCKLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



KERRY BUCKLEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



MICHAEL P. BUCKLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Political Science 



MICHAEL P. BUCKLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 




PAUL S. BUCKLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



TIMOTHY D. BUCKLEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MARA BUDDY 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



JOHN BUN! 

Arts S: Sciences 
B.A. History 



RICHARD T. BUNNELL 

.Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



Friends 291 



PEGGY A. BURGESS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



EDMUND C. BURKE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Physics 
Mathematics 
Philosophy 



JANET M. BURKE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




Bob Feeney, Rich Van Horn, Roy, Joe Hore, Bob, Paul Wagner, Joe 
Driscoll, Mark Bucceri 



Judicial Board Blotter 

(Editor's Note: This week The 
Heights begins a biweekly Judicial 
Board Blotter. The blotter includes 
cases of alleged misconducts by EC 
students judged by the Student Judicial 
Board, Administrative Hearing Board 
or University Conduct Board.) 

2,104 complaints were initiated 
last year. Students submitted 
complaints to the Dean of Student's 
office and the dean or assistant 
dean schedule a fact finding meet- 
ing. If necessary, cases are then 
referred to a judicial board. 

Ninety percent of referred cases 
go to the Student Judicial Board, 
made up of thirty-six under- 
graduate students. The remaining 
cases go to the Administrative 



Hearing Board, made up of an 
assistant dean, an assistant housing 
director and a B.C. administrator or 
Jesuit, or the University Conduct 
Board. Only major threats to 
health, safety and tranquality are 
referred to the University Conduct 
Board, composed of faculty, un- 
dergraduate and graduate 
students. 

When a student is judged guilty, 
judicial boards impose sanctions. If 
a student demonstrates lack of due 
process or introduces new 
evidence, an Appeals Board, which 
includes the Dean and Vice 
President of Student Affairs, 
reviews the case. 

NovQR3J2|^LJ982 



KAREN A. BURKE 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



KATHLEEN BURKE 
-Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




KIRSTEN ANNE BURKE 

School of Education 
B.A. Elem-Special Education 



MARY LOU BURKE 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 




CAROLYN BURNS 

School ot Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



KR/STEN BURRELL 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 




CHARLES E. BUTLER 

Aris it Sciences 

B.S. Biology 

Computer Science 



MARY E. BUTLER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 



292 Friends 





CHRISTINE M. BYRNE 

Sdiool 1)1 Niiisiiig 
B.S. Nursing 



GAIL P. BYRNE 

Sclioul ol Maiiayciiifiil 
B.S. Marketing 



MICHAEL A. CABELIN 

.School o( MaiKigcinciU 

B.S. Finance 



DANIEL D. CABOT 

Ans X: Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



CHARLES N. CABFJIL 

Ans &: .S< ieiices 

B..'\. Romance Languages 

Kconomics 





SALLY A. CABRAL 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



BERNARDO CACERES STEVEN A. CADEMATORI 
School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Computer Science B.S. Economics 



£. CHRISTOPHER 
CACCIANO 
Arts ic Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JOHN D. CAHILL 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 




KENNETH CAHILL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Computer Programming 



MARGARET CAHILL 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



EVE M. CAIROLI 

School of Education 

B.A. Elem-Special Education 



CARLOS CALA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 



AMY J. CALIENDO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




:^i 






t' 




MARIE A. CALLAGHAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



PATRICIA A. 

CALLAGHAN 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 
Quantitative Analysis 



JULIE M. CALLINAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



MARIA E. CALZ.ADA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Economics 

Mathematics 



ANTHONY P. 

CAMMAROTA 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



Friends 293 



RONNA M. CAMPANELLI KERRY C. CAMPBELL CLARE M. CANNON 

Arts & Sciences School of Management Arts & Sciences 



B.A. Psychology 



B.S. Marketing 



B.A. English 
Political Science 



MARK J. CANNON 

.'\rts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Economics 



NANCY C. CAPOZZI 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 





^m^ 



ANN E. CARDELL 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development 

Communications 



KRISTIN M. CARDELLIO 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

English 



KATHLEEN M. 
CARDINAL 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



CHRISTOPHER J. 
CARDINALI 

.Arts K: Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 



WILLIAM JAMES CAREW 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

History 




FLORENCE A. CAREY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Political Science 



MICHAEL S. CAREY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



RICHARD J. CAREY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Theater Arts 

English 



PETER CARIDE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



KEVIN M. CARNEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Finance 




MAURA J. CARNEY MONA A. CARPENTER 



.\rts & Sciences 
B..^. Communications 



School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ANTHONY CARPI 

Arts X: Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



EILEEN M. CARR 

Arts Ji; Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



SUSAN T. CARR 

.\ris &■ Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



294 Friends 




JUDITH A. CARROLL 

Alls X: Sticiucs 
B.A. I'olilical Science 



PHILLIP J. CARTER 

Sclioiil ol Maiiatii'incnl 
li.S. Finance 




MARGARITA CARVAJAL KIMBERLY A. CARVALHO 
Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics B.A. Romance 

Languages 




Patti Lawless, Maria Foz, Deb Grey, Anastasia Welch 



Bob Hope Delights 
Roberts Center Crowd 

The jam packed Roberts Center 
served this past Saturday as center 
stage to one of America's greatest 
entertainers, Leslie Townes Hope, 
better known to millions as Bob 
Hope. 

He played to a capacity crowd of 
4,000 and was aided throughout 



the evening by the talents of Gene 
Steede and Company, the Boston 
College Jazz Band, Ruby 
Newman's Orchestra and radio 
personality Jess Cain. 

The enure time that he was up 
on the stage, he was able to 
generate laughs from his audience. 

November 8, 1982 




MARCEL J. CASAVANT 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



WENDY J. CASE 

School ot Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



BRIAN B. CASEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



DIANE F. CASEY 

School ol Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



DIANE P. CASEY 

School ot Education 

B.A. Elementary Special Ed. 




PAMELA J. CASEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




PATRICIA A. CASEY 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



MARY R. CASS 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 



CARLOS A. CASTELLON 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



MARY S. CASTELLONE 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



Friends 295 



BEN J. CAT ALAND 

Arts &■ Sciences 
B.S. Political Science 



JOHN M. CATALDO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JOHN C. CAT ERIN A 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



DEBORAH A. CATTLEY JOSEPH T. CAULFIELD 
School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Finance B.A. Economics 




Kevin Osgood, Laurette Ulrich, Mark Scheel, Pat Cavanagh, Tom Emery 



Tailgate Kegs Banned: 
UGBC Protests 

According to the UGBC Newsletter of October 
28, the Athletic Department and the University 
have established a new policy concerning tailgat- 
ing. The main emphasis of the policy concerns 
banning kegs at tailgates of football games. 

Dean of Students Edward J. Hanrahan, SJ was 
unavailable for comment regarding the keg ban 
and Assistant Dean of Students Michael D. Ryan 
refused to discuss the policy. 

Despite the fact that the keg ban was to be in 
effect for last Saturday's game, the Campus 
Police took no action against numerous people 
with kegs at the game, according to Campus 
Police Chief Kenneth L. Watson. 

"It was physically and morally difficult to 
enforce the new policy on such short notice," said 



Watson. 

Rather the officers patrolling outside the 
stadium warned the tailgaters of the new policy. 
Watson stated, "you cannot change an activity 
overnight, not one which has grown over the past 
years like drinking at the tailgates. It is going to 
take a lot of co-operation from the BC commu- 
nity." 

UGBC President Lois Marr said that 
Hanrahan, claiming he did not witness any kegs 
at the Penn State game and because there were 
no student write-ups in relation to kegs, has con- 
cluded that the policy was a success and shall con- 
tinue to be enforced at all future football games. 

Marr argued that since it was Parents 
Weekend last week the policy was not properly 
tested. 

NovdhiberS, 1982 




SEAN J. CAVANAGH 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 




DIANA R. CAVANAUCH 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




LISA A. CAVANAUCH 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Theater Arts 



296 Friends 



1 



Ih^ 



-f 



4 





ANTHONY R. CAVUOTI 


DENISE M. CAYER 


LYDIA T. CEDRONE 


MARIA J. C. CENTEIO 


NADEREH 


Alls X; Sciciucs 

B.A. Psytliology 

Etoiiomics 


Scliodl III Mati.i^i'iiiciU 
B.S. Markcliiig 


Arts & SticiKcs 
li.A. Kcf>noniics 


S( liool <)l Nui-sing 
U.S. Nursing 


CHAHMIRZADI 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance Languages 





MARIA A. CHAMORRO MARIAL A. CHAPPELL 
Arts & Sciences School of Education 

B.A. Studio Art B.A. Middle School 



?r CHERUBINO 


UNCLING VICTORIA 


ANGELO AROLDO 


Arts & Sciences 


CHIANG 


CHIARLONE 


B.S. Biology 


Arts & Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 




B.S. Economics 


B.A. Economics 





MELISSA CHIN 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



SUSIE Y. CHIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



BETTY P. CHINC 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



PABLO CHIRIBOGA 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance Economics 



CHIN HAK ALEXANDER 
CHONG 

Arts &: Sciences 
B..S. Chemistry 





MYONG A. CHONG 

School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 



WILLIAM D. CHRIST LYNN ANN CHRISTMAN JOHN S. CHRISTO 
Arts &: Sciences Arts & Sciences .Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science B.S. Biology B.A. Economics 

Psychology 



STEPHEN G. CHUN I AS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



Friends 297 



GREGORY CIAMPA 
School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



RITA K. CIAMPA 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CHRISTINE A. CIASTKO 

School oi Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 



LAURA CICCHELLI 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



ROBERT W. CICHEWICZ 

School of Management 
B.S. Einance 




ANTHONY J. CILEA 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 

B.A. Philosophy 



MARY C. CINGARI 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DEBORAH E. CIRINO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



JOSEPH P. CISTULU 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. English 



PAMELA A. CLANCY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 




LISA A. CLAREY 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development 

English Communications 



CYNTHIA E. CLARK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



DAVID D. CLARK 

School ol Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Economics 



AMORY S. CLIFFORD 

School of Eduiation 
B.A. Human Development 



JAMES D. CLIFFORD 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 




LINDA CLIFFORD 

Arl-S & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



PETER CLIFFORD 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 
Philosophy 



LIZABETH A. CLINTON 

.School ol Management 

B.S. (Computer Science 

Finance 



PAUL A. CLOOS 

Alls S; .Sciences 

B.A. EnglLsh 



KAREN L. CLOUSER 

.•\rls Ji: Sciences 

B.A. English 



298 Friend', 




Tricia Ciasc) , Kaicii Burke, Kerry Moroiiey, 1 racey Wallisch, Chi 
Lubanski 



Exams Altered for 
Bowl-Bound Students 

In order to accomodate students 
wishing to attend Boston College's 
first appearance in a major college 
bowl game in 40 years — the 
Tangerine Bowl in Orlando, 
Florida — the B.C. administration 
has decided to alter the schedule 
for final exams. 

The decision was reached Friday 
afternoon by Academic Vice 
President Joseph Fahey, SJ, in 
collaboration with President J. 
Donald Monan,SJ, thedeansof the 
undergraduate schools, the regis- 
trar's office and various other 
departments of the university. 

After much consultation, Fahey 
notes 'that the exam schedule will 



be as follows; exams to be given on 
Saturday, December 18th will 
remain as scheduled, but there will 
also be the option to take these 
exams on December 11th at the 
same time and place as originally 
scheduled. As well, exams 
scheduled for Friday December 
1 7th will be offered as an option on 
December 10th at the same place 
and time. 

Fahey explained that "to take 
advantage of the option the 
student won't have to show a ticket 
stub. However, no more exceptions 
to the exam schedule by the faculty 
shall be allowed without proper 
authority." 

November 22, 1982 




ELIZABETH M. CLOWER TIMOTHY J. COAKLEY 



Si liool ()l VxWm iiiioij 

II. A. Scdfiiilaiy Kducalion 

Kri(i|isli 



S( hool oi Managcnirni 
li.S. I'iiiarjic 




DAVID J. CO BEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



JOHN COCLIANO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




WILLIAM J. COHANE 

Alls & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



PIERRE V. COHEN 

School oi Management 
B.,S. Finance 





WENDY A. COHEN 

.S( hool of Education 
B.A. Elementary t3diicalion 



MARY COHLER 

School ol Management 

B.S. Business Administration 



MARY E. COKONIS 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



ROBERT J. COLANCELO CAROL A. COLDREN 

Arts &c Sciences Scliool ol Management 

B.A. Communications B.S. Marketing 



Friends 299 




\-^/ 





MAUREEN A. COLEMAN RICHARD P. COLLIER BERNADINE M. COLLINS DONNA M. COLLINS 
School of Management Arts &^ticnces ^"-'L"?' "' Nursing School til Ninsiiig 



B.S. Marketing 
Computer Science 



B.A. English 
Philosophy 



B.S. Nursing 



B.S. Nursing/Health Ed. 



LYNNE M. COLLINS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Communications 




MAURICE J. COLLINS MICHAEL J. COLLINS 
Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English B.A. Mathematics 

Computer Science 



PETER J. COLLINS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



STEPHEN J. COLLINS 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Romance Languages 



FRANCISCO J. COLON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




Keistin Gnazzo, Amy Fillipone 



Alumni Share Views of 
Past and Present 



\(.v(-mber 22, I9S2 




BRIAN D. COLPAK 


JOAN T. COMER 


.Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 




PAMELA M. CONDRY NICHOLAS M. CONFORTI 



Ai Is & Sciences 
B.A. EiiKlisli 



School of Managemeiil 
B.S. Finance 



300 Friends 



ROBERT W. CONKLIN TIMOTHY J. CONLEY 



Siliuol ol M.iiuif^tniciU 
B.S. Accouiiung 



Alls & Sciences 
B.A. Hislorv 



EILEEN M. CONLON 

Arts & ScicTuc's 
B.A. Kngli.sh 



MAUREEN 

CONNAUCHTON 

Alls & Sciciitcs 

B.A. F.nglish 



MAUREEN P. CONNOLLY 
Alls Ik .Sciences 

15. A. Kiiglisli 
Oiniinuniciilions 




MARKD. CONNON 

Arls & Sciences 
B.A. Polilical Science 



DANIEL P. CONNOR 

.Schciol cif Maiiagenienl 

B.S. Finance/Spanish 



THOMAS M. CONNOR DANIEL S. CONNORS III DONALD P. CONNORS 
School of Managemenl Arls & Sciences School of Manafjcment 



B.S. Finance 



B.A. Coininunications 



B.S. Com 



Managcii 
puler Scii 




NANCY M. CONNORS TERENCE P. CONNORS 



School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



Arls & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JOHN CON ROY 

School ot Managemenl 

B.S. Computer Processing 



DIN A M. CONSOLINI DONNA M. CONSOLINI 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance Languages B.A. Romance Languages 



Germanic Studies 



Germanic Studies 




MAURA CONTRATA 

School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 



JOHN D. CONWAY 

Arls & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



RAYE ANN CONWAY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

History 



MICHAEL A. CONZA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



PATRICIA M. COOK 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 



Friends 301 



ALLISON M. COPPOLA 

Alls & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



CHRISTINE M. 

CORCORAN 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



MICHAEL CORCORAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



WILLIAM P. CORCOVAN 

School ol Managcmenl 
B.S. Business Administration 



MARIA CORDIO 

Arts ^- Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 
Romance Languages 




BRUCE CORNELIUS 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



CATHERINE D. 
CORRICAN 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.S. Sociology 

Economics 



JOSEPH W. COSTA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biochemistry 



JOANNE A. COSTAS 

School of Ecfucation 

B.A. Human Development 

Communications 



JOHN M. COSTELLO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 




RICHARD W. COTELL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. English 



THOMAS E. COTTER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



LYNDA M. COUCH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CLARE COUCH LIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



ALEXANDER A. COUTO 

Arts K: Sciences 

B.A. History 




KELLY A. COWAN 

School of Education 

B.A. English 
Human Development 



DANIEL W. COX 

.School ol .Management 

B.S, Marketing 



LINDA R. cox 

School of Managcmenl 
B.S. Marketing 



JOSEPH E. COYLE 
.Xrls & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JOANNE M. CREAN 

Si liool ol Education 

B.A. Elem-Speiial Education 



302 Friends 



I 




Nick DeMarco, Jav Strebb 



Fun and Games In Orlando 

I he iiavv blue sliiil wilh llic 
oraiigo IcMlfriiig gave liiiii away, as 
dul liis bccr-iiKlucc'd ear-lo-c-ar 
grin. I knew an Aultiiiii hiii was 
walking in my diicciion. 

There was only one aisle led by 
ilie plethora of people ihal were 
/ippcrcd inlo Rosie O'Grady's 
(more on ihis astrodome of a bar 
later) this night before the T-Bowl 
and he was coming this-a-way and I 
was going that-a-way. 

I really wasn't looking forward to 
this encounter 'cause I figured I 
was going to be subject to some 
southern wisdom alDOut how we 
was goin' to get whupped. 

He saw my maroon and gold and 
probably thought I was going to 
recount how the North won the 
war and how the South would fall 
once more. 

"Hey, listen," he said showering 
me with suds, "we're opponents on 
the field, but that doesn't mean we 
can't drink together." 



And Willi ,1 swig ol his liun italic 
(iliai naiiiming ((jiKociion) lie was 
oil, ba( k lo hi.s sea of orange aiifl 
i)liK- liial |)erif)dically broke inlo a 
bellow of "Wanirrr . . . Kagle!" 

Twelve hours later, the .song 
remained the same. The cheers of 
"Warrrrrr . . . Kagles" and "(jO 
Kagles" drowned into one until the 
B.(i. band played in its finest hour. 
Marching up the street in front of 
Rosie's, the band biased out "For 
Boston, For Boston ..." under a 
balcony-perched, flag-waving |. 
Donald Monan. 

Nothing is as uiiilyiiig as a spoi i 
here at Boston (^(jllege and thai 
moment saw a B.C. communiiy 
unified in spirit and emotion. // 
certainly was oiw of Llie. grealesl 
rnomenls tjt the storied histoiy of this 
university. 

Oh yes, and there was a football 
game later that day. And Auburn 
did win, 33-26, to steal the thunder 
of B.C.'s roar. 

Janijajx24^_1983 




-s 




CHARLES G. CRESCI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Mathematics 



DEBRA COOKE 

School of Management 

B.S. Business 



ANNE M. CRONIN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



DIANE M. CRONIN KATHLEEN J. CRONIN 

School of Management School of Management 

B.S. Finance B.S. Accounting 





DEBORAH L. CROTEAU CAROLE M. CROTTY 



S(h()(>l of Management 
B.S. Business Management 



School ()( Eduialion 
B.A. Human Development 



COLIN E. CROWELL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ROBERT C. CROWLEY 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CARL J. CRUZ 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Friends 303 







CARLOS D. CSHIRIBOCA JOHN S. CULLEN 

School of Managemciu Stiiool ol Manaifcmciit 

B.S. Finance B.S. Accounting 
Economics 



SHARON A. CULLEN 

School oi Management 
B.S. Marketing 



LESLIE E. CUMMINCS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



DAVID W. CUNIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 






^ 2 ^^ t ^ 



DEIRDRE A. CUNNANE 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



COLLEEN M. 
CUNNINGHAM 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



DAVID L. CUNNINGHAM JOHN A. CURRAN 
Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics B.A. History 



THOMAS A. CURTIN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 




Brian Fitzgerald, Tom Steven.s, Mii<.e Santagota, John Cullen, Chris Smith, Marty Fallon 



Students Ask: Can We Afford BC in '83? 

January 31, 1983 




MARGUERITE M. 

CUSACK 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 




MICHAEL J. CUSACK 
Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Kconomiis 



304 Friends 



ELIZABETH C. 


STEVEN M. CZERTAK 


JENNIFER L. DACEY 


MARK P. DACEY 


WILLIAM M. DACEY 


CUSANELLI 

School ()( Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 


St Iiool ()t M.ui.igt'iiit'iil 
B.S. Finance 


.Si liool ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 


.'\ris ,'v Sc icnccs 
B.S. Biology 


.St liool ol .Managcint-nl 

B.S. linancc 

KconoDiics 




CETH ANN DAILEY 

Arts & Science 

B.A. Political Science 



DOUGLAS M. 

D'ALESSANDRO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 



LISA B. D'ALESSANDRO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



KATHLEEN M. DALEY 

School ol Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



DEBRA A. DALY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Spanish 




A^ 



JOAN M. DALY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Mathematics 



fk.^ 



KATHLEEN DALY 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Ed. 



ELLEN L. D'AMATO 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 




SUSAN D'AMATO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




ELAINE M. D' AM BROS 10 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 




DOMENIC D'AMICO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JOHN A. DAM ICO 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 

Finance 



JULIE ANNE DANIELS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 
Computer Science 



MARYANN DANNA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Computer Science 



GERARD D. D'ARIANO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



Friends 305 



PUERTO DA RIO 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



JOSEPH D. DARLING 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MARIA M. DARONCO 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



ANN M. DAUNT 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



LOUIS D'AVANZO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




DENISE M. D'AVELLA 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 




I'm. "^ 



l^^i^ 




]AMES S. DAVEY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 

Romance Languages 



STEVEN DAVID 

Arts Sc Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



JEANNE M. DAVIS 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 




MARILYN J. DAVIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 




MICHAEL C. DAVIS 

Arts &; Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



TIMOTHY C. DAVIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



PATRICIA E. DAWSON 

School ol Education 
B.A. Elem-Special Education 



JANE A. DAY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



ROSELLA C. DEACAZIO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance Languages 




GEORGE T. DEANGELO MARIA A. DEBLASIO 

Arts & .Sciences School of Nursing 

B.A. History B.S. Nursing 



BRENDA M. D ECO NT I LUISA A. DEDOMINICIS NUNZIA DEDOMINICIS 

School of Nursing .School of Education .^rls & Sciences 

B.S. Nursinj^ B.A. Human DevclopMicnl B.A. Romance Languages 



306 Friends 




John L. Reillv, Andrew Kreshik, Michael Noore, Sara Bloom 



Intramural Update 

B-Ball: What's in a Name? 

During the Christmas break, the 
Rec Plex was pretty serene and 
short on patrons. Pick-up hoop 
games were few and far between. 
Since the opening of second 
semester, the place is overflowing. 
Apparently, several New Year's 
resolutions fell into the fitness 
category. However, pick-up games 
are just as hard to come by. That's 
because all but one court is taken 
every afternoon by the ever 
popular Intramural Basketball 
League as it continues its season 
into the playoff stretch. 

The popularity of the sport is 
documented by the fact that over 
100 teams are involved; including 
21 Women's and 84 Men's. The 
men's league is divided into 61 



College teams and 23 Pro teams. As 
you can see the competition started 
before the season with the selection 
of team names which range from 
inside jokes to honest commen- 
taries. Some don't play the game, 
like the always original EC Men. 
My favorite squad has got to be 
Jerry's Kids with an inspirational 4- 
2 record. The women keep it too 
clean but did throw in Valley Girls 
— f 'er sher! 

Play runs hot and heavy most of 
the game and "showtime" starting 
with the opening tap. The fierce 
comp forces the refs to use their 
whistles an awful lot. It appears 
they are just trying to prevent in- 
capacitating injuries. So far they're 
doing the job as all players seem to 
have a hell of a time. 

January 31, 1983 



THOMAS DEGNAN 

Alls &: S( icnci-s 
li.A. KiiKlish 



BRIAN J. DECUZMAN VALERIE E. DELACENEST 
Arts &: Sciences School of Management 

B.S. Biology B.S. Marketing 




CHRISTINE DELANEY CAROLYN M. DELANO 
Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications B.A. English 




JOHN D. DELEO 

School ol Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



LAURA F. DELL 

School ol Management 
B.S. Accounting 



SHARON A. 

DELOUCHREY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 



JOAN MARIE DELUCA MICHAEL £. DELUCA 

Arts &: Sciences Arts &; Sciences 

B.A. English B.S. Biology 



Friends 307 



ADRIENE DEMARCO 

Arts &; Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



NICHOLAS P. DEMARCO 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



JEFFREY A. DEMASO 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



GREGORY J. DEMPSEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



LIUBETH K. DENHAM 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

English 






THOMAS W. DENNIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



PAUL F. DERRICKSON 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



CARLOS O. 
DESCHAPELLES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



SPENCER L. DESHIELDS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



DAVID A. DESOUZA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




Bob Daley, Chip Walsh, Martin, Mike McCauley, Ted Lane, Chris Taylor, 
Mike Donegan, Brian Murphy, Frank Mitchell, Rick Jones, Joshua 
Tracey, Tom Hone, Pete Poske, Paul Wagner, Dennis Faucher, R.J. 
McMahon, Mark Dacey, Brian Morrill, John Conway, Joe Driscoll, Paul 
Harrington, Hank Murphy, Andy Zelter, Neal 



ROTC Interest on Upswing 

Over half of the BC cadets are on 
scholarship which covers full tui- 
tion, books, supplies, and fees. 
According to scholarship cadet 
Tim Sliney, "The four year 
commitment was something to con- 



sider early on, but the leadership 
skills I have learned already, along 
with having my education paid for, 
makes it definitely worth it. I don't 
regret my decision." 

January :^1. 19H;^ 




DAVID J. DES ROCHES 

.\rts &: Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 
Cximputer Science 



CAROL L. DEUCHLER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 
Computer Science 




GLEN E. DEVANE 

School of Manageim-ni 

B.S. Accounting 

C^ompulcr Science 



RICHARD D. DEVERNA 

S( hool of Managemeni 

B.S. Finance 



308 Friends 





BARBARA M. DIBELLA ROSITA C. DIBERNARDO DEIRDRE DIBIACCIO 
Arts & Sciences School oi Maiiagc-iiK-iu Ails ik Sciences 

B.A. English B.S. General Mgint. B.A. Econoniits 

Polilical Science 



LISA P. DIBIASE 

School oi Educalion 

B.A. Unman Oevelopnienl 



DIANE D I BON A 

Alls & .Sciences 
B.A. Ojmpuicr Science 




FRANK M. DICAPUA 
.Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



BARBARA F. DICHIARA ERIC J. DIEFFENBACH JOHN L. DICIUSEPPE JULIANA A. DICIUSTINI 

School of Management .Arts & Sciences School of Management .Arts & Science 

B.S. Marketmg B.S. Biology B.S. Finance B.A. History 
Human Resources 





JOAN E. DILLIHUNT 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



MARTHA DILLON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



FRANK T. DILORENZO 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Marketing 



JUDITH A. DINARDO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KATHLEEN A. DINN 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 




LEAH M. DINNICAN JACQUELINE M. DION DANIEL J. DISCHINO 

Arts it Sciences Arts &: Sciences School of Managemeni 

B.A. Mathematics B.A. Psychology B.S. Accounting 



DENNIS DISCHINO 

School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 



ANTHONY A. DIZON 
.Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



Friends 309 



KATHY DMOHOWSKI 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



CHARLES T. DO BENS 


ANDREW C. DOCKTOR 


NANCY L. DOERR 


DANIEL P. DOHERTY 


Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Philosophy 

Economics 


Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Philosophy 

English 


Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 

Economics 


Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Coniinunicalions 






m^mm 



MAURA JEAN DOHERTY ANNE M. DONAHUE 

School of Management School of Management 

B.S. Marketing B.S. Finance 

Computer Science Marketing 



JANE DONAHUE 

Arts 8c Sciences 
B.A. English 



MICHAEL P. DO NEC AN 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



DONALD DONLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Geology & Geophysics 




SMA 



CHRISTOPHER B. 
DON NEC AN 
Arts &-• Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



BRIAN F. DONNELLY JOHN M. DONNELLY, JR. 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Economics B.A. Economics 

Finance 



KATHLEEN M. 

DONNELLY 

School of Management 

B.S. Business Admmistration 



THOMAS H. DONNELLY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Theater Arts 




CHRIS M. DONOCHUE 

.\rts & Sciences 

B.A. Iheology 

History 



TARA M. DONOVAN TIMOTHY P. DONOVAN KATHRYN M. DOOLAN STEPHANIE M. DOOLEY 



Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Coniputer Science 



.Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Conununifations 



,\rls c<: Sciences 
B.A. Romance Languages 



310 Friends 




ANN CHRISTINE DORAN 

Arl.s & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 




PATRICIA M. DORS BY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




ALLISON A. DOUGHERTY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




Suzanne Gill, John Whelan, Sue McGuiness, Kevin Mendel, Eileen Foley, J<jc Euore, Mike Niewinski. 
Morris Collins 



Trustees Approve 
$800 Tuition Increase 

As the snow began to fall and the majority of 
B.C. students went alxjut their usual business last 
Friday, a small group of students staged a sit-in 
and rally all day to protest the possibility of an 
$11 00 increase in the overall cost of education at 
B.C. While 40 or 50 devoted demonstrators 
persisted with chants of "Fight the hike!" and 
"Education not inflation," 24 of the 40 members 
of the Board of Trustees, meeting directly above 
the striking students, passed an increase totalling 
$1075 over this year's cost for tuition, room and 
board. 

The culmination of B.C.'s annual budget 
process resulted in an $800 increase in tuition 



bringing that total t(j $6800. Room and board 
will be raised an additional $150 and $125 
respectively bringing those totals to $1830 and 
$ 1 725. For the average B.C. student that li\es on 
campus and dines in the cafeterias, this adds up 
to a bill of $10,355 if he wishes to remain for the 
1983-84 school year. 

These figures represent a slight drop in the 
recommendations given to Executive Vice 
President Dr. Frank Campanella by the Budget 
Committee. The $800 tuition hike is $20 less 
than the one recommended by the Budget 
Committee. This $800 elevation is an increase of 
13.3% compared to the proposed 13.67%. 

February 14, J 984 




ELIZABETH A. 
DOUGHERTY 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JAMES J. DOUGHERTY MARIBETH DOUGHERTY BETTINA DOULTON 



School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 
Accounting 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



MARJ< V. DOW 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



Friends 311 



DEIRDRE MARIE DOWD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



BARBARA S. DOWLINC 

Arts ii: Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



KEVIN I. DOWNEY MATTHEW ]. DOWNEY PETER J. DOWNING 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




ELLEN C. DOYLE 

Arts Sc Sciences 

B.A. English 



TARA M. DOYLE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 



REBECCA M. DRAECER 

School ot Education 
B.A. Human Development 




JOAN C. DRAIN 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



WOODRUFF W. DRICCS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 




DAVID M. DRISCOLL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 




JOSEPH S. DRISCOLL 

School o( .Management 

B.S. .Xccounling 




\ 



A /y 



V 
^ 




Debbie Farmer 



Chris Mullen At Large 

The Mods: A Trial Run 

at Middle Class Living 

It was just about the same time my brother 
Bill was graduating from BC that they erected 
the Mods. It was a big thing at the time — the 
housing situation then was even worse here 
than it is now. They were pre-fab, of course, so 
actually they weren't erected, they were 
dropped by a crane. A big news item, though, 
and everybody from the Cardinal to Governor 
Volpe was there, with every newspaper and 
TV station represented. 

The BC band played and a huge crowd of 
students and dignitaries cheered. The 
Cardinal doused the crane with holy water as it 
lowered the first Mod into place. Click, click, 
whirr went the cameras; the bigshots smiled 
and cut the ribbon. 

And the thing collapsed. Down went the 
grinning faces, limp went the hearty hand- 
shakes. 

Since then the Mods reputation has 
somewhat improved. The whole concept is 
kind of a trial run in middle-class living. Next 
thing you know, they'll be putting up street 
signs and starting PTAs. 

Febiuarv 14, 1983 



312 Friends 



PAUL T. DRISCOLL 


RENEE A. DROLET 


THEODORE C. ]R 


Scliool ()l ManagcMic'iil 


Scliot)] t)f Nursing 


DRUMMOND 


B.S. Finance 


B.S. Nursiii;; 


Arls & Sciences 
B.S. 



MICHAEL J. DUBOIS 
ScIkjcjI <j1 Managenienl 
B.S. Computer Science 



DOROTHY P. DUDLEY 

Arls & .Sciences 

B.A. Knglish 
I'fjliiical Science 




JAMES C. DUDLEY 

School of Managcmenl 

B.S. Marlceung 



CAROLYN F. DUFFY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

English 



EILEEN M. DUFFY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 



SANDRA A. DUFFY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 



ANNE DUNCAN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 




MARY PAT B. DUNN 

School ol Education 

B.A. Theater Arts 

Elementary Education 




ROBERTO A. DUNN 

School of Management 
B.S. General Mgmt. 




^ r:,A 




PATRICK J. DUNNE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 




^^^A I 



JANEEN M. DUNSEITH NELSON A. DUPERE 
Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. English B.S. Computer Science 




ROBERT DURAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. History 



JEFFREY D. DURBIN JENNIFER A. DURBURC 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



LISA M. DUS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



DEBORAH A. DUSTIN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



Friends 313 



AMY E. DWYER 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 



SUZANNE DWYER 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



EILEEN EARLY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Spanish 



VICTORIA M. EASTUS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Art History 



CAROL J. EDDY 

School ol Niu'sing 
B.S. Nursing 




STEPHANIE A. EDSON DENNIS M. EDWARDS JOHN H. EDWARDS COLLEEN M. EC LESTON JOHN F. EIDMANN 

School of Management Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences School of Education Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Finance B.A. English B.A. Political Science B.A. English B.A. Economics 
Human Resources Mgmnt. Communications Elementary Education 




JOHN K. ELDER 

Arts & Sciences 

B..A. Psychology 

Economics 



JAMES M. ELSMAN 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



CATHERINE R. EMELLO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



THERESA E. EMENS 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



ROBERT D. EMERY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 




■-■■■ .. "•, -M. ■/JM- .-«-^'' „ ' 



,/i^:'i;' 




RICHARD C. ENCEL 

.\ris & .Sciences 

B.A. English 

Economics 



CATHLEEN M. ENCELS 
.\rts He Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



BRIEN A. ENCLER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English, CJerman 



NANCY M. ENGLISH 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



KURT K. ERB 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 

Finance 



314 Friends 




Rob Crowley 



Golden Lantern Offers 
Appetizing Change 

11 I hose long liiKS in J'^aglc-s 
Ncsl (lull your appclilc and 
tilt- i(ii'a ol aiiolher TV 
dinner luins yoiii' slornacli, 
you aic noi alone. Huiidreds 
o( B.C. sUident.s have found 
an appetizing alternative at 
The (iolden Lantern, the on- 
campus restaurant located in 
the dining area of Walsh Hall. 

"I've seen those lines at 
9:00 am when I take the 
reservations for dinner," said 
Pearl Feeney, a hostess for 
The Golden Lantern. "The 
people are lined up almost 
out of the building. And the 
phone rings off the hook all 
morning. I alternate by tak- 
ing one phone reservation 
and one person in line," she 
continued. "No matter how I 
do it, we're booked by 9:15 
am." 

The Golden Lantern, 



wliK h is in its lourili semester 
at the present location, is a 
growing operaiioti according 
to Sandy .Silveira, the 
reslauiani manager. 

"About one-third of our 
business for lunch deals with 
the faculty and staff," said 
Silveira. "I hose are the i>nly 
reservations we take for 
lunch." Silveira explained 
that luncheon meetings for 
business and li.C. depart- 
ments are very regular. 
However, the popularity with 
the students is overwhelming. 

"I think the reason it is s(j 
popular is because it is good 
food, big portions, and the 
students can pay with points," 
said senior Michele Lowney, a 
former waitress at The 
Golden Lantern. "It is a nice 
change of pace because it is 
gourmet food. The only 
problem is fighting for reser- 
vations." 

February 14, 1983 




JOAN ERBIN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Art History 

Economics 



MONICA A. ERNEST! 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theater Arts 



MARIE ERNST 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 

Finance 



JEAN M. ESSEX 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.,'\. Political Science 



JOSEPH R. ETTORE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




LOUIS K. EVANCELIDIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MELLINDA M. EVANS 

School ol Etluialion 
B.A. Elem-Special Education 



SUSAN M. EVANS 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



SUSAN FABER 

School ol Management 
B.S. Management 



JOHN J. FALCONE 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



Friends 315 



I LEAN A FALL A 

Ai ts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



GREGORY FALLON 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JEANNE M. FALLON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



JOSEPH M. FALLON 

Arts &; Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 
Political Science 



MARTIN J. FALLON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




Diane Moriarity, Michael Murphy, Louie D'Avanzo, Amy Glackin, Tom 
Laurin, Bob Cichewitz, Patricia O'Reily, Rich Stanton, Sarah Vernier, 
Tracey Neave, Matt Downey 



Who's On First: 

A Sure Hit at Three Stars 

Are you one of those people who 
have become a regular ai Molly's on 
Friday afternoons? If so, we feel 
that you should broaden your 
horizons. Not too much further up 
Commonwealth Avenue awaits a 
happy hour that can't be missed. 

Once inside Who's on First, you 
find yourself overwhelmed by 
pictures of all the Red Sox players 
and other sports favorites. The 
posters literally cover the wall (or is 
it wallpaper?). On the upper level 
there is often a solo guitarist who in 
many cases demands audience 
participation (which is a dangerous 
idea during happv hours). 



Downstairs, there is a DJ and 
dance floor creating a pseudo- 
disco atmosphere. Although the 
dance floor may be crowded, no 
one usually cares after a few $2 
pitchers. When there isn't dancing, 
you can watch television on the 
large screen instead. 

Overall, Who's on First can be con- 
sidered a fun bar frequented 
primarily by college students. It 
covers all of the bases — reasonable 
prices, live entertainment, and an 
atmosphere which adds up to a 
good time. Therefore we 
encourage you to get into a little 
spring training of your own by 
heading for Who's on First. 

March 14, 1983 




ANTHONY L. FALOTICO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MARK A. FALVEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




DARIA E. FANELLI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ROBERT J. FANNING 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




MELISSA A. FARINA 

Si hool ol Ecliu.ition 

B.A. Hmnan Development 

Conmumicalions 



CHRISTY L. FARMER 

.'\rls it Sciences 
B..\. (lomnuniicalions 



316 Friends 






■! 



** ^k 



<€lri^^ 



& 




LORI A. FARNAN 

Alts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 
Psychology 



/W/l/^ryO T. FARONE MICHELLE C. FARRAR 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



Alts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



USA ]. FARRELL 

School ol Man.igcmenl 

B.S. Accounting 



WILLIAM C. FARRELL 

Alts Ik ScieiKes 

B.A. I'olitiiaj Science 

Knglisli 




DENNIS FAUCHER 
School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



DONALD C. FEENEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ROBERT F. FEENEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Economics 



JANE E. FEITELBERC 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Psychology 



JOHN J. FEITELBERC 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 




CHRISTOPHER D. FELKER CATHERINE M. FERGUS KEVIN P. FERGUSON 
Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences School of Management 



B.A. English 



B.A. Mathematics 



B.S. Finance 



MARIA A. FERRANTE 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Marketing 



USA A. FERRARA 

School Management 

B.S. Accounting 




RICHARD A. FERRARA JAMES A. FIASCONE 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



JOHN G. FIKIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



ROSALBA A. FIN A 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 

Finance 



STEPHANIE G. FINE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



Friends 317 



MAURA D. FINICAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



ROBERT M. FINN EGA N 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



LISA C. FIRICANO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Comptitei Science 

Mathematics 



BRIAN J. FITZGERALD 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



JENNIFER]. 

FITGERALD 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Economics 




KERRY A. FITZGERALD 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



MARGARET E. 
FITZGERALD 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



PATRICIA FITZGERALD NANCY K. FITZGIBBON KELLY J. FITZPATRICK 

Arts & Sciences School of Education Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science B.A. Human Development B.A. Economics 

Romance Languages Theater Arts Computer Concentration 




THERESA M. 
FITZPATRICK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ROSEMARY D. FLACH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



DIANE FLAHERTY 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



JOHN J. FLAHERTY 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



JOSEPH £. FLANAGAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

English 




KAREN A. FLANAGAN WENDY R. FLANAGAN STEPHEN R. FLATLEY ELIZABETH J. FLETT REBECCA A. FLOCK 

School of .Management Arts & Sciences .School of Management School of Nursing .'\rls it .Sciences 

B.S. Marketing B.A.English B.S. Computer Science B.S. Nursing B.A.English 



318 Friends 




MARKD. FLO RES 

Si hool ol MMriagi-iiii'iil 
B.S. Accounliiij^ 



LUANNE M. FLORIO 

.S( hool ol Kciucalion 
B.A. Elementary Educalion 




LORRAINE FLYNN 

School of Managenifiil 

B.S. Management 



MARY ELLEN FLYNN 

.Alls & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 




Tom Casey, Aiitonella Pina, Tommy Godfrey, Kalfiy Leonard, Melissa 
Massey, Eileen Gibbons, Tim Davis, Sheila Mulligan, Mara Falvey 



University Applicant 
Pool on the Rise 

In spite of the fact that there has 
been an overall decline in the 
number of students seeking higher 
education at private universities, 
Boston College has experienced an 
increase in the number of appli- 
cants for the class of 1987. 



Recent tuition increa.ses have 
apparently not been reflected in 
the application pool. Though 
research completed by the admis- 
sions staff this past summer in- 
dicated that more students chose to 
enroll in public institutions, B.C. 
has fared well. 

March 21, 1983 




MARY L. FLYNN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JAMES E. FOCARTY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 
Communications 



EILEEN FOLEY 

School of Efiucation 

B.A. Mathematics 
Secondary Education 




MICHAEL B. FOLEY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



DANA M. FOLLETTE 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 




ELAINE FONC 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



MARY FONTANELLA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Sociology 



REG IN A V. FONTS 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



KELLY FOOTE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



ROBIN A. FOPIANO 

School of Education 
B.A. Early Childhood 



Friends 319 



ROSE ANN FOPPIANI 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



KENNETH M. FORD 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MICHELLE P. 
FORREST ALL 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



NICHOLAS B. FORSYTHE 

.•\rts & Sciences 
B.A. Unclassified 



LISA H. FOSTER 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




Kristen Thibodeau, James Winokur, Peggy Becker, Woody Driggs 



Expansion Plans? 
Bids For More Land 

Boston College has made a bid to the Metropo- 
litan District Commission (MDC) for two parcels 
of land adjoining the campus. This action has 
raised some controversy among neighbors, who 
fear the land will be used for further expansion 
and state officials, who claim that the open bid- 
ding requirements for the sale of the land are 
being violated. 

The majority of the land, totaling approxi- 
mately 3.5 acres, is located along St. Thomas 
More Drive and contains MDC underground 
water lines. Presently two state legislators, who 
are B.C. alumni, are backing the sale of the land, 
claiming that the University would use it only to 
meet open-space requirements for the expan- 
sion of nearby facilities. 

Legislative approval would have to be attained 
before B.C. would be able to buy the land, noted 
MDC Spcjkesman Steve Biirijav. State Inspector 



General Joseph Barresi, however, feels that even 
with the approval, the requirements for an open 
bidding process of state land would be in viola- 
tion. 

Burgay explained that prior to 1980 it was not 
uncommon for people who wished to buy state 
land to deal directly through a government offi- 
cial, often a friend, to assure the attainment of a 
piece of a piece of land. Then in 1980, the 
establishment of legislative Bill 579 put an end to 
all of this by requiring that state land be sold 
through an "open-bidding" process. This would 
insure that "the public would have the opportu- 
nity to buy the land, and that the highest price be 
paid for it," Burgay explained. 

It is precisely this bill, which Barresi is using to 
back his claim that the bidding process is in viola- 
tion, and which B.C. must overcome if it is to 
have bidding rights to the land. 

March 28, 19S;5 




PETER FOSTER 

School of Management 
B.S. Management 




EILEEN P. FOWLEY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




JERRY P. FOX 

.'\rls & .Sciences 

B..\. (lonnniniic.ilions 



320 Friends 



STEPHEN J. FOX 

Arts X: Sciciucs 
B.A. Economics 



MARIA L. FOZ 

Alls & SiiciKi-s 
B.S. I'sythology 



KELLY A. FRANCIS BETHANY A. FREEMAN LESLIE M. FREEMAN 



Alls & SciciK cs 

U.A. Psychology 

English 



Alls ik Sciciii cs 
B.A. Psychology 



Si liodi ol iVIaiiagciiiciii 
B..S. Miiikcling 




SHEILA J. FREEMAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 



DEBORAH E. FREESE ROBERT C. FREIBERCER 
Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. English B.S. Finance 



MIRIAM A. FREITAS 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



THOMAS C. FRENCH 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 




PAUL E. FRIES 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



DONNA E. FROSCO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 



DONNA FROSCO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Historv 



JULIE E. FUCARILE 
Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 



JOHN S. FUCHS 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 




JOANNA L. FUEHRER MARY E. FULCINITI 

School of Education .Arts & .Sciences 

B.A. Human Development B.A. Political Science 

Communicaticjns 



LYNNE-ELLEN 

FULCIONE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Art History 



PAMELA A. FULLERTON 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



KRISTEN L. FURIA 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



Friends 321 



THOMAS P. FURLONG 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Computer Science 



BARBARA I. FUSCO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




THEODORE J. CAFFNEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



JOHN H. CAGE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



MARIS A C. FUSCO 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 
Romance Languages 



ANTHONY C. GAFFNEY ELEANOR M. GAFFNEY 

Arts & Sciences Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Philosophy B.A. Economics 




MARK V. GAGUARDI 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Theology 

Economics 



ANDREA J. GAGNE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



MARIA GAGNON 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




ROYD. GALANG 
Arts ic Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



JOHN J. GALGAY 

.Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



JAMES P. GALLAGHER JOSEPH C. GALLAGHER, SUSAN M. GALLAGHER 

School of Management JR. School of Management 

B.S. Finance Arts & Sciences BS- Marketing 

B.A. Communications 




ANDREA J. GALLATIN 

.Arts & Sciences 

B..A. Communications 



fr>d%. 



JOANN M. GALVIN ARTURO F. GAMBARINI 
.Arts & Sciences .\rts & Sc iences 

B.A. Mathematics B.A. Psychology 




lUd^M 



FERNANDO 

GARCIA-CHACON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 



CECILE M. GARCIA 

.Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



322 Friends 




FRANCISCO J. GARCIA 

Alls & Silences 
B.S. Biology 
Philosophy 




ANTHONY S. GARCAS 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. History 




Bobby Durran, Diane Helow, Chris Misari 



BC Plans for a Garage; 
Hopes for an Arena 

Wily docs [').('.. want lour more 
acres of land? For ilie pasi few weel^s 
li.(;. lias l)eeii iiiakiiig a coticcrled 
edorl to answer lliis<niesl ion aiifl (on- 
vince its neigiibors and Massa< iiuseits 
legislators that it has no extensive 
building plans despite its desire lor 
this acreage. 

The land in (|ncslioii is actually 
three different pieces of land, accoi d- 
ing to Finance and Business AHairs 
Vice President and Ireasiuer John 
Smith. "One that is three and a hall 
acres (Beer Can Hill), the rjther is the 
third base line at Shea Field and the 
third is the back of the garage which is 
about 6,000 to 7,000 feet," he said, add- 
ing that the three pieces together 
equal about four acres. 

At the present time, B.C. is leasing 
part of this land from the Metropo- 
litan District Commission (MDC). 

April 18, 1983 





LISA M. GARIPPO 
Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 
Political Science 



THOMAS P. GARNER MICHAEL J. GAROFALO 
School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Finance B.A. Psychology 



PATRICK J. GARRY 

Arts He Sciences 

B.A. History 



ETHEL B. GARVIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 






LISA R. GASPARD 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JOANNE M. GATES 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JOHN C. GATTI, JR. 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



MAUREEN C. GAUGHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



SHERRY A. GEE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



Friends 323 





hd^k 



GEOFFREY CEIS 

School oi' Managemeiu 
B.S. Finance 



CHRISTOPHER CENCARO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



TIMOTHY R. CENIRS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 



DANIEL J. GENTILE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



DAVID GENTILE 

School ol Management 
B.S. Marketmg 





RICHARD J. GEORGEU 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 



PATRICK C. GERAGHTY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Economics 



JOSEPH S. GERBASI 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 




PAUL D. GERVAIS 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



KRISTEN A. GESMUNDO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 




Colleen Witt, John Roberts, Erin Brown 



Housing Triples Three Dorms 

The class of 1987 surpasses all of its 
predecessors in many ways. It is larger than 
in previous years. It has, on the whole, 
achieved distinction academically, in 
leadership positions, musically, theatrical- 
ly, and athletically. Yet, there is another dis- 
tinction: in three of the dormitories in 
which they will be housed, freshmen will be 
tripled. 

The shortage of space, which, to some ex- 
tent, has become normal, doubled this year. 
Ranging from 50 to 60 spaces, it escalated 
to 102. Therefore, B.C. housing came up 
306 beds short for the class of 1987. 

Director of Housing Richard Collins 
stated that everything seems to be going 
well. So far no complaints have been 
received at the housing office, but, he 
added, some parents showed concern for 
the situation. 

Of the freshmen interviewed, all of 
which are from Cheverus third, all seem to 
be handling the situation well. However, 
their quarters are quite cramped. 

September 12, 1983 



324 Friends 



UNEAL S. CHURA 

Scliool (ll M;iii.igiiiR-iU 

lis. liiuiiice 

Conipulcr Science 



DONALD J. CIAMPIETRO SUSAN F. CIANNUZZI JOSEPH CI Aau INTO MICHAEL C. CIARDIELLO 



Alls X; Siic'iiii'S 
li.S. Political Science 



S( Ih)()I ()i Man.igciiK-nl 

B.S. linaiice 

Computer Science 



Alls & S( iciK cs 
B.A. Suidld An 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. K(onomics 
Political .Science 




EILEEN A. CIBBONS MARYANN T. CILBERT 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



School of Education 
B.A. Early Child-Special Ed. 



JANICE GILL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



SUZANNE A. GILL 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



ANNE G. GILLESPIE 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Child-Special Ed. 




ANNE M. GILLETTE 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 
Political Science 



THOMAS F. GILSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JOHN J. GINLEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Finance 



LAURIE A. 

GIOVANNUCCI 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Biolcjgy 



DEBORAH A. GIRARD 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 




CAROLINE J. GIUFFRIDA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



AMY E. CLACKIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



CECILY M. GLAVIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 
Communications 



KRISTIN A. GLEBUS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 
Computer Science 



MARY K. GLORA 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



Friends 325 



WILLIAM V. GLOWIK 

School of Management 

B.S. MarkeUng 



REG IN A CODVIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KERSTIN R. CNAZZO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Computer Science 



PHYLLIS MONiaUE H. 

CO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Philosophy 




DAVID H. COG AN I AN 
Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



STACIA M. CODDARD 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



THOMAS GODFREY 

.Vrts ii: Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 




LINDA M. GOGGIN 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



JILL A. GOLDMAN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MAANI GOLESORKHI 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 





%^^^ 



ili;^A^i% 




MARIA F. GONCALVES 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



GEORGE W. GONSER 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DENYSE GONTHIER 

School ol Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



ROBERT L. 

GONZALEZ- MO LIN A 

.^rts &• Sciences 

B.S. Biochemistry 



IRENE R. GOOD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 




LAURA J. GOODMAN MICHAEL J. GORDON SCOTT M. GORDON CHARLENE L. GORGA 



.Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



School ol Managcmcnl 
B.S. Finance 



School ol Managcmcnl 
B.S. Markcling 



.\rls & .Sciences 
B..\. Communications 



R. CRAIG GOSS 
.-Xrts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 
Communications 



326 Friends 



i 




ELAINE A. GOTTLIEB 

Alls iv; Siiciucs 
B.A. English 



MARK COWETSKI 

School ol M.iiuigcment 
U.S. Finance 




JULIE E. GRACE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



THOMAS M. GRACE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Economics 




I'at McGeehan, Tom 1-icncli. 1 oiii Den 



The Great Escape to the 
Cape 

The summer's over and it's time 
again to hit the books. You've been 
spending every waiting hour stand- 
ing in lines and listening to boring 
professors while your mind has 
drifted back, to those last mindless 
summer days on the beach. 

It's not too late to enjoy the hot 



days oi Indian Summei here in 
New England. Just an hour south 
of Boston, a 70 mile arm of sand ex- 
tends into the Atlantic Ocean. 
Locals affectionately call it "The 
Cape" and many college students 
spend the long summers away 
from home on its beaches. 

September 12, 1983 





'W&--^ 



^llHiiiiljM^ 



SHARON E. GRAEB 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



MARYBETH GRAFF 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



NINA I. GRAMAGLIA 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



MARIA GRAMMAS 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Finance 



MARY A. GRANDE 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 




MARIE L. GRANT 

School oi Educalion 
B.A. Human Development 



MICHAEL S. GRANT 

School ot Management 
B.S. Marketing 



DEBRA T. GRAY 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Computer Science 



JOHN E. GREENE, JR. 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



DAVID T. GREENFIELD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 



Friends 327 



SANDRA L. GREENLAW 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 
Mathematics 



KATHY A. GRECO IRE 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CAROLYN J. CREW 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketnig 



MONICA M. GRIESDORN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



LINDA M. GRIFFIN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




PATRICIA GRIFFIN 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 

Elem-Special Education 



PAULA GRIFFIN 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 

Psychology 




WILLIAM NICHOLAS 

GRIFFIN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



WILLIAM T. GRIFFITH 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 




JULIE J. GROTHAUS 

School of .Management 

B.S. Finance 



328 Friends 



JOHN L. GROZIER 

School ol Management 
B.S, Finance 




Frank Mitchell, Chris Taylor 



Mary Ann's: The Jungle 
of Cleveland Circle 

Mary Ann's is located in Cleveland 
Circle on Beacon Street. It is accessible 
by car, bus, or simply by following the 
crowd on Thursday night. 
Overall rating * * 

Features: Happy Hours, especially 
from 12 to 1 am Thursday nights. 
Dress: Very, very casual. 

It's 12:00 am and the Rat has 
closed. But the night's not nearly 
over.Just ask the die-hards and the 
true B.C. "pah-ti-ahs" where they 
go. Where else but Mary Ann's, 
affectionately nicknamed "MA's" 
by B.C. students for generations. 

It's a common Thursday night 
phenomena — the exodus from 
the Rat to Cleveland Circle, that is. 



You simply cannot imagine the 
number of people that MA's can 
accomodate — or at least the 
numbers they do accomodate. 
Mobility inside of the bar from 12 
to 1 is fairly unheard of, unless you 
can position yourself behind a 
football player or someone of equal 
stature, in order to meander 
through the crowd. 

"So what's the attraction?" you 
may ask. Well, it's a B.C. hang-out, 
and the beers are cheap. And it's a 
good place to go if the Rat's filled or 
if you've vowed to do homework 
before you go out and can't make 
the Rat. It's nearby, and can be fun, 
if you're up for it and don't have 
any early-morning classes on 
Friday. 

September 19, 1983 



I 



TIMOTHY J. CUARNIERI NANCY J. CUDAITIS PATRICK M. CUERT IN JEANINE M. CUIDO 



Arts &: Scionccs 

B.A. CompuUT Science 

Mathcnialics 



School ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



Arls & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



GLENN A. CULINO 

Aris Jv Si i<ii(es 

B.A. Kdirioinics 

Pliilos(jfjliy' 





'h^h 




TIMOTHY M. CUNNING 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



TRACY A. GUY 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. C:ornmunications 



MARGARET E. HAFEY 

Evening College 
B.S. Accounting 



SARAH M. HAGE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

History 



CHRISTINE HAGGERTY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Economics 





JAMES N. HAJJAR 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



MARIS J. HALL 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. English 



AMY E. HALLISEY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



SHAWN M. HALLORAN PATRICIA C. HAMILTON 
Arts &: Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications B.A. English 




LISA F. HAMMOND 

School of Management 

B.S. Human Resources 

Management 



THOMAS HAMMOND 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MARY Y. HAN 

School ot Management 
B.S. General Mgmt. 



DAWN E. HANAWAY N. CHAU HANH 

School of Educatif)!! Evening School 

B.A. Elem-Speciai Education B.S. Business Adininistration 



Friends 329 



JENNIFER M. HANLON PATRICK A. HANNICAN MICHAEL T. HANNON ANNA M. HANRAHAN SHEILA M. HANRAHAN 

School of Management School of Management School of Management Arts & Sciences School of Education 

B.S. Finance B.S. Human Resources B.S. Accounting B.A. Political Science B.A. Elem-Special Education 

Management 




MICHELLE HANSON 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Marketing 



MARIA K. HARKINS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



SCOTT C. HARLOW 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



JOSEPH M. HARNEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



PAUL HARRINGTON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 




MICHELLE HARRISON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



KELLY A. HART 

School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 



PAUL C. HART 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Marketing 



JANE E. HARTE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ERIC A. HAS BUN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Economics 





Ai^^^ 



CATHERINE A. HASSEY ELAINE M. HASTINGS SUSAN M. HASTINGS 
.Arts & Sciences .•\rts & -Sciences ,\rts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics B.A. Psychology B.S. Biology 

English 




KAREN E. HAUGHEY 

School ol Management 
B.S. Maikcliiig 



WENDY A. HAUSER 

.Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. English 



330 Friends 




ALLYSON R. HAWKINS JACKLYN A. HAXTON 

Alls ^L' Si ic'iu c"S S(li(>()Iol Kdutalion 

B.A. Etoiumiics B.A. Elciiiciilary Kcliicalioii 




MICHAEL P. HAYES CATHERINE A. HAYNES 
School of Managemeiii School ol Education 

B.S. Accounting B.A. Eleni-Special Education 




Elaine Power, Gail Byrne, Ellen Wilson, Soraya A.stefi, Michelle Biener 



Women Win Big East 

Tennis 

Walsh's 7-5, 7-6 Victory 

Clinches Title 



team clinched the big East Champi- 
onship for the first time since the 
conference was formed five years 
ago. 

Walsh's trim 7-5, 7-6 victory 
As Syracuse's Gilly Tippett's assured B.C. the tide, 
final stroke sailed beyond the 

baseline, Julie Walsh and the October 24, 1983 

Boston College women's tennis 




ALICIA E. HEALEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



CHRISTOPHER K. 

HEASLIP 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 



SUZANNE P. HEBERT 

School of Management 

B.S. Human Resources 

Management 



ALYSSA M. HECK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JAMES W. H EC ARTY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



GERALD A. HECCIE 

School ol Management 
B.S. Marketing 



WILLIAM P. HELFRICH 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 



DIANE M. HELOW 

School ol Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 

Economics 



PETER R. HEELAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Economics 





^* 



I 



it; 



ANDREW HEMMER 
Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 



Frie7ids 331 



RAYMOND M. 

HEMSTREET 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



SUSAN E. HENDERSON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

English 




LORIETA E. HERNANDEZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 




SAMANTHA A. 

HERNANDEZ 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 




JANET R. HESENIUS 
Arts & .Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



BETH A. HENNESSY 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Marketing 



JO- ANNE H ERIN A 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Philosophy 



CRISTINA M. 

HERNANDEZ 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Political Science 



^ -^Me 2740 Hl^ 




n 



Drew Kerr, Kevin Rowe, Todd Jackowitz, Ann Ricard, Dierdre, Lori Nulse, Jennifer 



Junior Year Abroad 
Provides Experience 

The Junior Year Abroad (JYA) program 
provides an opportunity for college students to 
grow and learn within a foreign educational 
structure. 

According to Professor James Flagg, director 
of JYA at Boston College, the program started in 
1959 with four students. At that time students 
were limited to the Fordham University program 
at Louvain and the Institute of International 
Studies program in Vienna. 

Universities are not the only organizations that 
offer higher education in foreign countries, 
commented Flagg. Organizations such as the In- 
stitute of European Studies and Higher Educa- 
li(jn in Europe offer educational programs in 



Europe. 

To be eligible to go abroad a student must have 
a cumulative average of 3.0 or better for three 
semesters. Flagg advised that students discuss 
plans for a year abroad with their parents, their 
professors and the director of JYA early in their 
sophomore year. He also advised students to 
start applying for programs in the fall. 

Flagg said that before a student applies to the 
JYA program, he must think about his career 
goals and academic goals. "An important ques- 
tion to ask oneself is what can I get from a year 
abroad that I can't get from B.C.?," Flagg said. 
He added that students who are considering 
going abroad should talk to students who have 
been abroad for a semester. 

January 30, 1984 



332 Friends 



r 

J 





JODI A. HESS 

Ar(.s X: Si iciHcs 

B.A. Mathematics 



KARYN A. HESSE 

Alls K: S( ii'iH fs 
B.A. Sociology 



SUE ANN HEWITT 

Stiiool ()l Miiii.i^ciiit'nl 
B.S. Markeling 



BARBARA R. HICKEY CRETCHEN A. HI LONER 



S( lioni o( Mariagcmciit 
B.S. I'iiiaiicc 



Alls ><c .S( iciiccs 
B.A. KoniaiKc Languages 




PATRICIA M. HILL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



ROSEMARY HILL 

School ol Manageinenl 

B.S. Marketing 

Human Resources Management 



HOLLY M. 

HILLENBRAND 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Art History 



CHRISTINA M. HIPPELI 
Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 



FRANKIE C.T. HO 

SchcKjl of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Computer Science 




MICHAEL C.H. HO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Physics 



PATRICK J. HO BAN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



BETH A. HOFFMAN 

School ol Education 

B.A. Elem-Special Education 



STEVEN J. HOFFMAN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



MAUREEN B. HOC AN 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. English 
Political Science 




LISA J. HOLDEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



KEN HOLLAND 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



THOMAS E. HONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



MICHAEL L. HOOTON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ADRIANNE HOPPER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Friends 333 



NANCY E. HORAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Computer Science 



SHARON M. HORRICAN 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



ROBIN S. HORWITZ 

School of Education 
B.A. Early Childhood 



GREGORY HOSBEIN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KEVIN J. HOULE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




DARRAGH M. 
HOULIHAN 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



CAROLYN A. HOWLETT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



PATRICK]. HOYE 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



JOAN Y.A. HSU 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MICHAEL J. HUDZIK 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Economics 

Mathematics 




JOHN S. HU ETHER 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ERNIA P. HUGHES 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



RICHARD MARK 

HUGHES 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



LORI L. HULSE 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



AMANDA HUNT 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 




STEVEN G. HUNTRESS 
.Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



SUSAN M. HUPPE 

Alts & .Sciences 
V>.S. liiology 



MARGARET HURLEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ROBERT G. HUSSEY J. BARRY HUTCHISON 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



.'\rts S: Sciences 

B..\. Comnumications 

Political Science 



334 Friends 



School ol M.in.igiiiuiu 

U.S. Aaouiuin)^ 

English 




ANNE-MARIE lANZITO 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 







Steve Rtjsa, Mike, Monica Corrado, Belhany Kessier, Vom Livaccari, Joe, Mrs. Thonias, 

Glenn Gulino, Peter, Dan P^itzgerald, Mark Wilson, Michelle Harrison, Dave Belchermini, Ken 

Doyle, Mike Celvechio 



Students Ralley; Trustees Increase Tuition 

February 13, 1984 




KATHLEEN T. ICOE 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



DENISE INCANDELA 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



GREGORY IRVINE 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



NANCYS. IRWIN 

School of Nursmg 
B.S. Nursing 



MARIA B. ISACCO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 





JOANNE JABBOUR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Romance Languages 



TODD JACKOWITZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JILL A. JAEB 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Classics 

English 



HEIDI JAILLET 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



RICHARD C. JANDA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Friends 335 



FRANCISCO J. 

JARAMILLO 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Fxonomics 



LANCE C. JENSEN 

Ai ts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Studio Art 



MARCIE JARRELL 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theology 



ANDREW J. JEANNERET 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



SIDNEY jEAR 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



PHILIP W. JENNINGS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Psychology 




KAREN JO AKIM 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



DAWN M. JOHNSON 
Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



LINDA E. JOHNSON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Pre-Med 

English 



RAYMOND M. JOHNSON 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Marketing 




Jennette Kinsella, Stu Shanus, Katie Doolan, Pete Posk, Peter Allen, Beth 
Anne Small, Karen O'Keefe 



Students Party, Soak up the Rays 

March 13, 1984 




SUZANNE JOHNSTON LORI A. JOHNSTONE 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




RICHARD A. JONES 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



LISA M. JORDAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 
Romance Languages 



336 Friends 



MICHAEL J. JORDAN 

Alls K: SticiKcs 
B.A. Economics 



LISA P. JOSEPH 

Alls t^- St i(.'n( cs 
B.A. Psychology 



RICHARD J. JOY 

-'\rls K: .Si iciu cs 
B.A. llis(oiv 



ANNE T. JOYCE 

,S( liool ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY C. JUDGE 

Alls & S( icMics 
\'t.,\. Malhciiiatics 




TERESA JUDGE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Philosophy 



ANN M. JULIAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Comnuinications 

English 



KATHLEEN L. JULIA NO JAMES G. JUMES 

School of Nursing Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Nursing B.A. Psychology 



PAUL JUNG 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 






YASMIN JUNUS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JAYNE E. KAKOL 

School oi Management 

B.S. Accounting 



CAROL A. KALE 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ELIZABETH J. KALE 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CAROLE A. KANE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 





KELLEY A. KANE 

School oi Management 
B.S. Accoiuiling 



STACEY M. KAPLAN NICHOLAS KARAMITSIOS CHARLES V. KASPARIAN SUSAN M. KASPEROVICH 
School ol Ecluiation Arts & Sciences School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Early Childhood-Special B.S. Biochemistry B.S. Marketmg B.A. Mathematics 

Ed. 



Friends 337 



CHRIS M. KASTER 

Arts &; Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KIMBERLEY A. KATES 

School of Education 

B.A. Himian Development 

Philosophy 



SUSIEMAE KATIS 

School of Management 
B.S. Accoimting 



DAVID L. KAUPP 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



FREDERICK K. KAYNOR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 




WILLIAM D. KEA 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



ROBERT E. KEANE, JR. 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KELLY A. KEANEY 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



MICHAEL J. KEANEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



MICHAEL J. KEATING 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 






ELIZABETH A. KEHOE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



KATHLEEN KEHOE 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Developinent 



LYNNE A. KEITH 

School ol Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



LORI S. KELFER 

Arts X; Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



EILEEN C. KELLEHER 

.Arts ft Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 




DEBORAH A. KELLEY 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



EDWARD J. KELLEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



EILEEN M. KELLEY 

Schorjl of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



HEATHER M. KELLEY 

.Arts it Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

English 



LISA A. KELLEY 
School of E<lucalion 

B.A. English 
Secondary Education 



338 Friends 




Lauri Berkenkamp, Kristin Burke 



BC Student Runs to 
Raise Money for Cancer 

III order to raise money l(;i ihe 
American Cancer Society and the 
National Flandicap Sports and 
Recreation Association, Jeff Keith 
will be running from Boston to 
I. .A. this summer. For most jjeople 
this would be a feat unto itself, but 
for this B.C. senior it will be much 
more. Keith will be running with 
one artificial leg. 

The idea for the run was Keith's. 
"It's an awareness run. It's to sJk^w 
people that anything can be done if 
they put their mind to it," he said. 

The campaign for the run is 
being handled by a Florida based 
public relations firm. Project 
Masters. (Project Masters is 
presently handling the Hart 
campaign.) The campaign is called 
"Run Jeff Run" and will be 
promoted nationally. 

Keith's run is scheduled to begin 
the morning of June 4 from 
Faneuil Hall. On the first mile of 



tiie nali(jnwi(lc Keith will Ijc acc(jiii- 
panied by Ted Kennedy, Jr., who, 
like Keith, also losi a leg lo cancer. 

1 he rest of the race will be done 
alone. Keith's plan of action is to 
run 20 miles a day, live days a week 
witli tfie other 2 days off. Barring 
any unforseen circumstances, 
Keith plans to finish the run in l.')6 
days. 

So far the determined athlete has 
received a lot of good response 
from the run. Such companies as 
Johnson and Johnson, Merrill 
Lynch, AAA and Federal Express 
have contributed to the campaign. 
"We are looking to get ,'$400,000 to 
cover expenses," explained Keith. 

Other companies such as Adidas 
and Nordica have endorsed Keith 
with their products. 

T-Shirts, hats and stickers will be 
sold to raise funds. A campaign is 
planned for the B.C. campus, but 
exact details are still sketchy. 
Donations are welcome. 

March 19, 1984 




MADELINE C. KELLEY 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



SEAN J. KELLEY 
School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



SHEILA KELLEY 

Evening College 
B.S. Business Management 



CAROL M. KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



JOSEPH P. KELLY 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 





PATRICE M. KELLY 

Arls & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Philosophy 



SHAUN P. KELLY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



SHEILA KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



SHELAGH KELLY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



THOMAS P. KELLY 

.Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Physics 



Friends 339 



URSULA A. KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Sociology 



WENDY BARNES KELLY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



KATHRYN JEANNE 

KELTERER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Sociology 



ALLISON N. KEMMERER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



JOANNE E. KEMPER 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




JILL M. KENDRICK 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



CHRISTOPHER C. 

KENNEDY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



CLARE M. KENNEDY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 




B.J. Aguliaro, Eric Walter, John Grosser 



Festival of Friendship 
Festival Promises 
to Bring Smiles 

Many smiling faces and a 
carnival type atmosphere are 
anticipated by the organizers of the 
annual Festival of Friendship, 
when over 200 special needs 
children will come to Boston 



College for a day of fun. 

The event will include many 
non-competitive sports, clowns, the 
Easter Bunny, musical entertain- 
ment, presentations by the B.C. 
Children's Theater and lunch for 
the youths and the 600 to 700 ex- 
pected volunteers. 

March 19, 1984 



JOAN T. KENNEDY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 

Philosophy 



KATHLEEN KENNEDY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




JOHN J. KENNEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MAURA A. KENNEY 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 




^l^il 




ROBERT J. KENNEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



JAMES B. KENNY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



340 Friends 



I 







'^x.-A 



KEVIN EUGENE KENNY J. ANDREW KERR 
Alls & SciciRcs Alls ik Sciences 

li.A. KcoMoiiiics B.A. English 

Philosopliy 





\ 



^t 



JACQUELINE A. KERR SCOTT W. KERSLAKE KATHLEEN M. KIAER 



St;li<)()l oi Nutsinj^ 
B.S. Nursiiiff 



Arls & SciciKCS 
B.A. Polilical Si iciitc 



Arls & Sciences 
li.A. Romance Languages 




CHARLES KICKHAM 

Alls & Sciences 
B.A. History 



EDWIN F. KILEY 

."Xrls & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Economics 



LISA A. KILEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Economics 



KRISTIE L. KIMBALL 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



LAURIE A. KINDERMAN 

School of Education 

B..^. Human Development 




EDWARD L.R. KING 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



JEANETTE E. KINS ELLA JOHN M. KIRCH NER 
.Arts & Sciences School oi Management 

B.A. English B.S. Computer Science 



ANN M. KLEIN 
School of Education 

B..^. English 
Secondary Education 



BETSY A. KLINE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




TERRI L KLUG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



LINDA S. KLUMPP 

Sch(X)l of Management 

B.S. Marketing 

Human Resources Management 



CYNTHIA ANN 

KNUDSEN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 



ELIZABETH L. KOHLER SUSAN M. KONCHALSKI 
Arts & Sciences .School of Nursing 



B.A. Economics 



B.S. Nursing 



Friends 341 



RICHARD S. KORCHAK JOSEPH A. KOSCIUSZEK 

School of ManagemeiU School of Management 

B.S. Marketing B.S. Accounting 



KELLY A. KOSSUTH 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



SOFIA KOTSOPULOS 

School ol Management 
B.S. Accounting 



LISA ANN M. KOWALSKI 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Computer Science 




KAREN E. KOZLOWSKI 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



CHRISTOPHER C. 
KRANICK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ANDREW P. KRESHIK 

School of Management 
B.S. General Management 



JOHN P. KULAS 
School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



TAD AS A. KULBIS 
School of Management 
B.S. Human Resources 

Management 
Marketing 




JO-MARY KULEVICH CHRISTINE M. KULLE 

School of Nursing School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing B.S. Nursing 



KENNETH L. 
KUPERSMITH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



KELLEY M. KURAS 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ALISON A. KURYLA 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 

Computer Science 




LISA M. KWASNIOWSKI 

.School of Managtmcnt 

B.S. Finance 



342 Frien±% 



DAVID P. LABBE 

School ol Management 
B.S. Marketing 



PAUL D. LA BELLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Conipuur Science 



ROBIN L. LABRECaUE 

S( liool ol ManagcinciU 
U.S. Finance 



LISA M. LACONCA 

Arts S; S( iences 

B.A. Political Science 



f 




Jim Langway, Ueirdre McKenna 



Thielman is New UGBC 
President 

The month long campaign for 
UGBC President ended last 
Tuesday night with Jeff Thielman 
claiming 1,493 votes, just 1 17 more 
than runner-up Dan Flynn. 

According to Thielman, the 
3.7% vote margin was due to "the 
fact that Flynn ran a great 
campaign. Anyone who could 
come from nowhere and get 1,376 
votes has talent." 

"I consider my campaign victo- 
rious despite the fact that I lost," 
said Flynn. "The dedicadon and 
the quality of people that worked 
with me. To come so far in such a 
short time makes me very happy." 

The presidential stipend ques- 



tion passed by more than a 2-1 
margin; 1 ,794 students favored the 
non-binding question of whether 
the UGBC president should 
receive a $4,000 stipend during his 
term in office, while 826 people 
opposed it. 

Thielman said he will adhere to 
the same campaign goals expressed 
in his platform. He claimed his 
administration will operate on two 
levels. The first level will work for 
greater student representation in 
policy making decisions through 
the establishment of a pan- 
university council made up of 
administration, faculty and 
students. 

April 2, 1984 




MARCO ANTON/0 R. 
LA CRUZ 

SiIkioI (il Maiiagcniciil 

B.S. hiruuKf 

KiciMoiiiiis 



ALEXIS A. LADD 

Alls & .Sticiitcs 
li.A. .Sociology 





f 



DENISE M. LAFLEUR MARGARET LAFORGIA 
Ait.s &c Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications B.A. History 




LtSETTE M. LAFRENIERE SHIRLEY A. LAGERSON 
School ol Education Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Early Cliilclliood-Special B.S. Biology 

Ed. 





^1^1 




KRISTI A. LAGERSTROM 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



JAMES LAHIVE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance Languages 

Political Science 



SHIRLEY LAI 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Computer Science 



JOHN C. LALIBERTE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Political Science 



ROBERT M. LALLO 

Sclioo! ot Management 
B.S. Finance 
Accounting 



Friends 343 



JAMES M. LAMBERT 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



KARA E. LAMPARELLI 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



JOHN LANDERS 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



EDWARD M. LANE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MARY L. LANE 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 




Ed Macchi, Chris Lynch, Nick DeMarco, Charlie Cresci 



Winter Storm Outs Power 
on Newton Campus 

As a resuk of the March 29 snowstorm, 
Newton campus was without electrical power 
that Thursday night and part of Friday. 

Downed power lines caused the campus to lose 
electricity at approximately 2:30 Thursday after- 
noon. Power was restored to Duchesne East and 
West, Hardey and Cushing at 10:30 am Friday, 
but Keyes North and South and Barat House, 
which are supplied with power from a different 
leader line, were dark until 2 pm Saturday, 
March 31. 

According to Kevin Downey, Area Director 
for Newton Campus, emergency lights came on 
in the dorm hallways immediately after the elec- 
tricity failed. These lights, however, are for 
evacuation purposes only, and are designed to 
last only up to three hours. After that time, the 



campus was in total darkness. 

"A Newton RA and myself went out to buy 
flashlights and lanterns," said Downey. "Every 
RA had a flashlight and most of the dorm recep- 
tionists had lanterns." Dorm receptionists and all 
of the 22 Newton RA's were on duty Thursday 
night, as well as a BC patrolman in each complex. 
Security, Downey said, was "not really a 
problem." 

There were other problems, however, such as 
several important exams scheduled to be given 
on Friday. Students were directed to the Stuart 
Law Building and the Barry Arts Pavilion, where 
there was auxiliary lighting. Many students were 
concerned as to whether the tests would be held. 

"Students kept asking us, 'Should we study or 
not?' and we said, 'Yes, study!' " said Downey. 
Most of the exams were held as scheduled. 

Apnl 9, 1984 




MARYROSE LANE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 




DAVID B. LANCILLE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




^ 




JAMES F. LANCWAY 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



344 Friends 




LAURIE A. LANOUETTE JEANNINE LAPLACE THOMAS M. LARKIN STEPHEN M. LAUBLE 



Alls X; Siifiuis 
B.A. K((>iu>nii( s 



Alls K- Si Iciucs 
B.A. I'olilii.il SrifiKt 



.S( 1h)oI of Maiiiii^fiiKiii 
B.S. A(t;()uiiliii^ 



Alls & Sciciucs 
B.A. Ktoiiotnics 



ELLEN C. LAURIE 

Schoul of Miiiiiigciiiciil 

B.S. Marketing 

Kinaiicc 




CHRISTINE L. LAWLESS PATRICIA A. LAWLESS 
School of Nursing School ot Management 

B.S. Nursing B.S. Accounting 



STEPHEN J. LAWSON 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



JEAN M. LEARY 

School ol Education 

B.A. Early Childhood-Special 

Ed. 



BARBARA T. LEE 

School of Management 
B.S. Markelmg 





DAVID K.Y. LEE 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



JOHN MICHAEL LEE 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



LILY LEE 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



MARTHA M. LEE 

School of Education 

B.A. Elem-Special Education 



MARYELLEN LEE 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 




MICHAEL J. LEE 

School ol Management 
B.S. Economics 



PUI CHINC LEE 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



WILLIAM L. LEE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ROBERT H. LEICHTON, 

JR. 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 



JEAN E. LEMIEUX 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



Friends 345 



ALISON LEONARD 

Arcs &: Sciences 
B.A. English 



KATHLEEN LEONARD THOMAS A. LEONARD 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



PERRY LEONC 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



WAI LEONC 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 






CHRISTOPHER;. 
LEPORATI 

Arts !k Sciences 

B.A. English 
Political Science 



A LAIN A LEVESaUE 

School ol Management 

B.S. Human Resources 

Management 

Marketing 



JOHN C. LEPORE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Theology 

Philosophy 



ALESSANDRA LEPPO 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Romance Languages 

Psychology 



JOSEPH E. LETENDRE 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ROSE M. LEW 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



JAMES LEWER 
School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



JEFFREY LEWIS 

School ol Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



JOHN F. LEUNC 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Biology 




JOHN F. LEWIS 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




SHARON E. LEWIS 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



MATTHEW CERARD 

LIBERTINI 

School of Managcmcnl 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



CRECORYP. LICHOLAI 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Philo.sophy 



MICHAEL LIEDER 

.Arts &■ Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JODIE ANN LIMON 

.Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Biology 



346 Friends 




ANN-MARIE LINEMAN 

SdiiMil (il Maiiaf^cniciu 

B.S. Coiupuit 1 Science 

Mai kcliiig 



JOHN J. LIN NEMAN 

School ol Maii.inciiK'iil 

B.S. Ciciicral Maiiagcmciil 

Finance 




JULIANA LIPPERT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



DICNORA LIRIANO 

School ol Education 
B.A. Human Development 




Helen McCuillaiigh, Sheila 1 laiiialian, liaey Mahoney, .Sue Sheridan, 
Kristin Yankee 



Boston Marathon to Go 
Kegless 

In an effort to crael<. clown t^n the 
amount of alcohol-related dis- 
turbances caused by Boston 
Marathon spectators, Newton and 
MDC police will be looking for and 
confiscating all kegs along the race 
route. 



Excessive drinking before and 
during last year's Marathon 
resulted in a near riot after some 
spectators handed runners glasses 
of beer instead of water. Newton 
residents also complained because 
of damage done to their property. 

April 9, 1984 





\) 



1 





LAURENCE W. LISTER, 

JR. 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



DEBORAH A. LISTON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance Languages 

Economics 



KAREN A. LIVECCHI 

School ol Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Marketing 



CARLOS E. LLANSO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



JEAN M. LO CONTE 

School ol Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 





M^ 





^^^ 



i 



DEBORAH LOGAN 

School <)1 Management 

B.S. Marketing 



CAROLINE R. LONG 

School ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



KATHERINE H. LONG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MELISSA J. LONG 

■Ai ts ^- .Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



ELVIS LOPEZ 

Schcjol ol Management 
B.S. Accounting 



Friends 347 



MARK D. LORUSSO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



JAMES LOSCOCCO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



DAWN I. LOWNEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Communications 



CHRISTINE S. LU BAN SKI 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



STEVEN T. LUBER 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 




MARY GRACE LUKE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



LORETTA A. LURE 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




^ 


■ 




TRACY A. LUTTAZI 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Psychology 



MICHELE R. LUZZI 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 




ALBERT THOMAS LYNCH CHRISTOPHER J. LYNCH 
.\rts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. Psychology B.S, Accounting 




Mymie Brenton, Bindu Methratta, Kristie Velasco, Eva Fury, Lisa Clark, 
Anna Marie Rotella, Diane Suski, Georgina Arrietta, Nicole Velasco 



Chris Mullen at Large 

The Last Baby Boomers 

Bid Goodbye to BC 

The following is the last article by senior 
columnist Chris Mullen as a student at 
Boston College. 

When you're a senior and it's 
April, you start thinking about 
things you meant to do. I have 
plenty of things I wish I had done 
differently. 

I wish 1 had known freshman 
year that you can tell runners in 
Eagles' Nest that you ordered five 
million side orders and they'll 
believe you. But I didn't. I wish I 
had been to Newton Campus dur- 
ing my four (alright, five) years 



here. But 1 haven't. 

Does anybody really know? 
People throw the word around a lot 
— the Me Generation, the Pepsi 
Generation (as if they checked IDs 
at the beverage aisle), the Lost 
Generation. 

I don't know who is right, but 1 
know I don't belong to the genera- 
tion of my older brothers. I don't 
think the kids living on Newton 
Campus are of my generation 
either. And what about these kids 
in junior high growing up on 
Donkey Kong and Boy George 
videos, where are they going to put 
them? Not in my generation, I'll tell 
you that much. 

April 26, 1984 



348 Friends 



COLLEEN M. LYNCH 

Ai(s & SticiKcs 

B.S. Mathematics 



EDWARD C. LYNCH 
SiIiodI oI MaiiagciUL-iU 
B.S. Computer Science 



KAREN L. LYNCH 

.■\ils & Si lenies 
B.A. Economics 



LAURA A. LYNCH 

.Alls & Sciences 

B.A. (^onnmiiiicaiions 

Knglisli 



MARY B. LYNCH 

Scliool ol .NiHsing 
B.S. Nursing 




ROBERT P. LYNCH 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



THOMAS F. LYNCH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 



ANN M. LYON 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CHRISTOPHER M. LYON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

English 



HARRY D. LYON 

.■\rts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




KEVIN J. LYONS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



MARGARET M. LYONS DAVID M. MACAIONE EDWARD J. MACCHI RICHARD A. MACCONI 
Arts & Sciences School of Management .School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Economics B.S. Marketing B.S. Finance B.A. History 

Philosophy 





LAURIE A. 

MACDOUGALL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



ELIZABETH A. MACEK 

.Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



MAUREEN A. 

MACFARLANE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

English 



DARLENE F. MACISAAC 

School ol Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JOHN MICHAEL 

MACKEEN 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



Friends 349 



^Jk 



CHARLES C. MACKEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



KATHLEEN A. MACKEY TIMOTHY MACLEAN 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

Marketing B.A. Studio Art 



PAMELA B. 

MACPHERSON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Economics 



MARTHA M. MADAUS 

.Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 









CLAIRE A. MADDEN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 



CLAIRE M. MADDEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Romance Languages 



SALLY ANN MADEIRA 
School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



MARYBETH MACUIRE 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



CHRISTOPHER C. MAHL 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 




JOHN A. MAHLER 

.Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Communications 



ANNE R. MAHONEY 
.Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 



MARY T. MAHONEY 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



SHEILA M. MAHONEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 

Finance 



THOMAS E. MAHONEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 




TRACY E. MAHONEY 

.Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



350 Friends 



CHRISTOPHER S. 

MA IT LA NO 

School of Management 

B.S. General Management 



ANDREW MALDONADO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



LAURIE J. MALLON 

.Arts & Sciences 

B.A. (Computer Science 

Mathematics 



SHEILA B. MALLOY 
.Arts & Sciences 
B..A. Psychology 



I 




Paul Norton, Ed Kiley 



Senior Dilemma: What to 
do After Graduation? 

"1 ley joliii, you waul a beer?" 

"Yc'h, sure," 1 said, |jro|)|jiug niy 
lec-l up on llic colTcc lablc. "Why nol. 
I don't have a final until Monday." 

'It's so hard to get niolivaled for 
linals this semester," barked RoHes 
Ironi the kitchen. "Hy the way, H(jw's 
the job hunting going? What are you 
going to be doing come June?" 

"Oh, didn't I tell you. I've got 
something definite lined up. Decent 
money and I know I'll go far," I said, 
hoping he would not persist. 

"What is it? The Patriot Ledger"? The 
Cape Cod Times? It's not the Globe is it?" 

"Well not exactly . . . you see my, 
ah, my mom and dad they, ah, they 
need their house painted see. Ah hell, 
they'll pay me 1,500 bucks." 

"You mean you're going home?" 

"Just for a while," I said, settling 
back in my chair. "I found a cheap 
flight to Europe." 

Aprii^e, 19:84 




DIANE M. MA LONE 

Arls ik S( iciK t-s 
iVA. (ioiMNiiicr Science 






ikM 



PATRICIA A. MA LONE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 










DAVID C. MALONEY 

School ot Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



LESLIE A. MAN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



KAREN MANCINI 

School of Education 
B.A. Elem-Special Education 



SANDRA MA NEE 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development 

Early Childhood 



CINA M. 

MANFREDONIA 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 






MARYBETH MANCAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 

Mathematics 



MARY F. MANCRAVITI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



MICHELLE K. 

MANNARINO 

School of Education 

B.A. Secondary Education 

Middle School 



JEFFREY W. MANNING MICHELLE C. MANNING 

Arts & Sciences School of Nursing 

B.A. Mathematics B.S. Nursing 



Friends 351 



PAUL S. MANNING 

Arts &-- Sciences 

B.A. History 

Romance Languages 



PETER J. MANNING 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MAUREEN E. MARA 

School of Education 
B.A. Hinnan Development 



ROBERT P. MARANDINO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JOHN MARCELYNAS 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 






JOHN B. MARCH 

School of Management 

B S. Finance 

Computer Science 



SCOTT ALLEN MAREK 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Management 



LISA MARIN 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development 



MARIJEAN MARMA 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



SHEILA M. MARRA 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



















li^^l 


W^' 


'■^F^^F '-''*. ^H^^^^^^ 








WKL 


^^% 










^^'^^^^ ^^ ^ 


1^1 


ri 




^Bjwwj^' 


-^^j^, J 




c«' 




Mike Mackeen 




O'Neill Library Begins 
New Era at B.C. 


and has the capacity to hold rough- 
ly 1.2 million books. 






This new library spreads 


out 




Less than three years after con- 


1,100 new study seats amor 


g its 




struction began on the "new" 


five floors. For two years 


the 




Hbrary, the Thomas P. O'Neill 


campus will lose the 400 spaces for 




Library opened its wood-trimmed, 


studying in Bapst, due to renova- 




tinted glass doors, over two weeks 


tion. 






ahead of schedule. 








The O'Neill library now holds 


August L 


1984 




approximately 700,000 volumes 










MARK G. MARRONE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



NANCY MARRS 
Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 




WILLIAM P. MARSAN 
.'\rls &; S( ienies 
li.A. Philosopin 



KEVIN M. MARSH 

School <>l ManagemerH 

B.S. Quantitative 

Analysis 



352 Friends 



RACHEL M. MARSHALL CATHERINE L. MARTIN 



Siliool ol M.MiagfniciU 
B.S. Markcliiig 



Alls t<: Sc ifiucs 
B.A. Sociology 



KAREN T. MARTIN 

Alls iL- Stii'iiccs 
B.S. Biology 



MICHELE C. MARTIN 

.St liooi ol Miiii.igcMicnl 
B.S. Markcliiig 



THOMAS J. MARTIN 

S( liool ol Maiiagciii<-i)i 

15. S. Maiki-liiig 




ROBERT M. MARTINEZ 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

History 



KAREN MARTINS 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



CATHLEEN R. 

MARTWICK 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



DONNA M. MASEK 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



MICHELLE MASI 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

English 




CHRISTOPHER A. 
MASSARO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



MELISSA A. MASSEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Romance Languages 



MICHAEL P. MASSEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Philosophy 



PETER MASSO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



LOUIS MASTRIANO 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 

Human Resources Management 





\ 




MANUEL MATACHANA MARTIN H . MATHEWS PAUL J. MATINHO NANCY L. MATTHEWS MELANIE C. MAUNG 



School ol Management 
B.S. Economics 



School ol Management 
B.S. Accounting 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Friends 353 



FARM AD MAVANDAD 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ALISON MCALARY 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



JOHN j. MCALEER 

Arts it Sciences 
B.A. English 



SUSAN R. MCALLISTER 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



ANNE C. MCANENY 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 






BRIAN N. MCANULTY KATHERINE M. MCCABE PATRICIA J. MCCABE KAREN A. MCCAFFERTY MICHELE MCCALLION 
Arts ii; Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. English B.A. Political Science B.A. Communications B.S. Marketmg 

Communications Finance 



B.A. Mathematics 




A^^^Mii^ 




I 



KAREN MCCANN 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



ANNE H. MCCARTHY EDWARD J. MCCARTHY HUGH F. MCCARTHY KATHLEEN MCCARTHY 

School of Nursing School of Managmcnt Arts & Sciences School of Nmsing 

B.S. Nursing B.S. Marketing B.A. Communications B.S. Nursing 

English 




LINDA M. MCCARTHY 

.Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



MAUREEN M. 
MCCARTHY 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



PATRICIA W. MCCARTHY 

Scliool of Management 

B.S. Finance 



SUSAN MCCARTHY 

.\rts & Sciences 
M..\. English 



CHRISTINE MCCAULEY 

School ol Managcinciu 

B.S. Marketing 



354 Friends 




Karen McC^ann, Jeanne- Sprano 



Pub Series Kicks Off 

True to his campaign promise to 
reopen the campus pub, Under- 
graduate Government of Boston 
College (UGBC) President Jeff 
Thielman has instated a new 
campus pub series, to be held main- 
ly in the Rat. 



"Boston College needs a place 
where students can meet, relax, 
and fraternize," he said. "The 
students of Boston College should 
not be forced off campus in order 
to socialize. 

September 17, 1984 




MICHAEL P. MCCAULEY LAURI S. MCCLELLAN 



Alls & SiicjKcs 
B.A. Kconoiiiics 



Alls & S( icnccs 
li.A. I'sytholojfy 




MARGARET A. FRANCIS J. MCCORMACK 
MCCONNELL Arts & Sciences 

School ol Education B-A- History 

B.A. Elem-Special Education Philosophy 

English 




JENNIFER A. 

MCCORMICK 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



PAUL J. MCCORMICK 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



MARIANNE C. 

MCCOURT 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 



ROCERT L. MCCREADY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



HELEN M. 
MCCULLOUCH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 
Psychology 




PAUL C. MCDERMOTT 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



KELLY A. MCDONALD 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

English 



NANCY C. MCDONALD 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

English 



RAYMOND P. 

MCDONNELL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 



ANN L. MCDONOUGH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



Friends 355 



MARGARET 
MCDONOUGH 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ME LAN IE MCEVOY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



CHRISTINE A. MCGARRY 

Ai ts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




Annie Pecevich, Ann Marie Stephanus, Bernadine Collins, Gail Killian, 
Marilyn Smith, Mary Bowker 



O'Neill Library Dedicated 
Amidst Pageantry 

Three years after the ground- 
breaking ceremony, the Thomas P. 
O'Neill, Jr. Library was dedicated 
with colorful pageantry, music, 
dance and speakers Sunday. 

House Speaker Thomas "Tip" 
O'Neill, a Boston College alumni, 
class of 1936, attended the 
ceremony and expressed gratitude 
for the honor of having the library 
named after him. "This is a truly 
magnificent library and a great 
university," he said. 

"The dedication should be a time 
to look back and to look forward," 
said US District Court Judge David 
S. Nelson, an alumnus recently 
elected chairman of the B.C. Board 
of Trustees, during his welcome 
address. 



The keynote speaker. President 
of the Carnegie Foundation for the 
Advancement of Teaching, Ernest 
Boyer, discussed the need for 
human interconnection and open 
channels of communication to stem 
the current trend of restricted 
knowledge. He also stressed the 
obligation of universities to help 
students broaden their perspec- 
tives to avoid "falling into a self- 
centered world." 

The Chorale performed "God 
My Glory," written by the 
University's Composer-in- 
Residence Dr. Alexander Peloquin 
specifically for the ceremony to be 
played outdoors and chore- 
ographed. The Liturgical Dance 
Ensemble performed to the music. 

October 15, 1984 



PATRICK MCGEEHAN 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Philosophy 



MILDRED M. 
MCGILLVRAY 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




ROBIN M. MCGINNESS MARY E. MCGINTY 



School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




ALICE MCGRAIL 

Evening College 
B.S. Business Administration 



BRIAN J. MCGRATH 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 




KAREN M. MCGRATH MICHAEL T. MCGUIRE 



School ol ManagemcMi 
B.S. Finance 



Si hool of ManagenieiU 
B.S. Maikeling 



356 Friends 



RECINA A. MCCUIRE ROBERT ]. MCCUIRE 

Ai Is ^i: Sciences Ails X: Sciences 

B.A. Economics B.A. History 

Philosophy Economics 



KIM A. MCHALE 

Alls &: Sciences 
B.A. Mathcnialics 



SUSAN J. MCINNIS MARY E. MCI NTYRE 



Sthonl ()i .M;niaj^enienl 
B.S. I'in.ince 



School III .Nursing 
B..S. Nursing 




ANDREW J. MCISAAC 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 



AMY S. MCKEEVER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



DEIRDRE ANN 

MCKENNA 

Arts &■ Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

English 



JAMES H. MCKENNA ROBERT E. MCKINNEY 



Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



School ol Management 
B.S. Marketing 




BRIAN J. MCKINNON LIANE M. MCKITCHEN ROBERT B. MCLAFFERTY BETH MCLAUGHLIN JOSEPH D. MCLAUGHLIN 

Arts & Sciences School ol Education Arts & Sciences School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology B.A. Severe B.S. Biology B.S. Marketing B.S. Biology 

Special Needs 




MAURA L. MCLAUGHLIN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communicaticjns 



MICHAEL E. 

MCLAUGHLIN 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



PETER J. MCLAUGHLIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 
Communications 



JAMES A. MCLEAN 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



LISA C. MCLEAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Friends 357 



JULIE E. MCMAHON 


R.J. MCMAHON, JR. 


DEBORAH E. 


GRACE E. MCNALLY 


JOHN B. MCNAMARA 


Arts ^- Sciences 


Arts & Sciences 


MCMANAMA 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


B.A. English 


B.A. Economics 


Arts & Sciences 


B.A. Physics 


B.S. Marketmg 


Art History 




B.A. English 









h^M 



MAURA M. MCNAMARA 

School of N in sing 

B.S. Nursing 



JOHN B. MCNEILL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



PETER J. MCaUADE MICHAEL P. MCOUILLEN MARY KAITLIN MCSALLY 
School of Management Arts & Sciences School of Management 

~ " ' B.S. Computer Science 

Quantitative Analysis 



B.S. Finance 



B.A. Political Science 





£^^ 




JOANNA MARIE 

MCSHANE 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



PATRICK J. MCVAY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 



JEFF M. MCWEENEY 

Arts &; Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MARY A. MCWEENEY 

Arts &c Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



JOHN W. MECCIA 
.Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ANA M. MEDEIROS ELIZABETH J. MEDINA 



.■\rls & .Sciciucs 
B.A. Political Science 
Romance Languages 



Arts & Science 
B.S. Biology 



SUSAN L. 

MECHREBLIAN 

Arls it Sciences 

B..^. Malhematics 



LARA MEASELLE 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




SUSAN MEHRI 
.\ns &: Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



358 Friends 




Judy Peralta 



Sdiial juslKc I. ('(I lire Sciirs 

Westheimer Speaks 

Frankly 

About Sexuality 

Dr. Kiiili Wcsiliriincr, 
I he rciiownecl psytlio- 
scxual lhcra|)i.sl, stressed 
I he need lo dispel 
ignorance of sexual 
ni alters d u ring li e r 
1 uesday night lecture in 
Roberls (ienler. 

"It behooves us Vo sit 
around and talk about 
sexual matters," she said, 
citing examples of un- 
wanted pregnancies which 
resulted from sexual 
ignorance. Westheimer ex- 
plained that the need for 
education prompts her 
philosophy of addressing 
sexual topics explicitly. 

Though sexuality 
should be taught, West- 



hciiiier .said site believes ii 
must also remain "a private 
malUrr." I'arenls should 
leach iheir (hildren that 
sexual matters, including 
masturbation, are not 
wrong, but shcnild be done 
in jjrivacy, not "in front of 
the television," she added. 

Westheimer summed u\> 
her attitude t o w a r d 
sexuality saying, "Any- 
thing two consenting 
adults do in the privacy of 
their bedroom, kitchen 
floor, or living room is 
OK." 

She is the author Dr. 
Ruth's Guide to Good Sex 
and has contributed a 
chapter to a textbook on 
sexuality and aging and 
rehabilitative medicine 
published by Saunders. 

October 15, 1984 




PATRICK N. 
MEISENBACHER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 
Computer Science 



CARYN M. MEKEMSON JONATHAN B. MELLIN 
School of Nursing School of Management 

B.S. Nursing B.S. Accounting 




STEVE MELON I 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



KEVIN J. MENDEL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




TERESITA M. MERCADO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



THOMAS MERCURO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 
Romance l^anguages 



ANNE F. MERIAM 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JOHN G. MERLES EN A 
School of Management 
B.S. C'.oiuputer Science 



HELEN MERREN 

School of Education 

B.A. HuiTian IDevelopment 



Friends 359 



MARY C. MESSER 

School of Education 

B.A. Elem-Special Education 



ERIN P. MESSIER 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



ANDREA M. MESSINA 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



JAMES R. MEYERS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KAREN C. MEYERS 
Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 




Joan Hsu, Peter McQuade, Maureen Connaughton 



X-Country 

Eagle Harriers Capture NE Title 

The Boston College women's cross country 
team raced to one of the most important victo- 
ries in its history Saturday at Franklin Park, 
grabbing first place in the New England 
Championships. 

It was a meet the Eagles had to win, and win 
they did. 

The Eagles finished well ahead of rivals 
Holy Cross and Boston University, putting 
them in a good position to qualify for the 
NCAA Women's Cross Country meet at Penn 
State in two weeks. 

The day started off magnificently, as sopho- 
more Leslie Wrikson won the junior varsity 
race with a time of 19:40 despite the rugged 
5,000 meter course. 

This win got the ball rolling for B.C., and it 
put them in an enthusiatic and positive frame 
of mind on what otherwise was a cold dreary 
day. 

The Eagles had been frustrated by the 
Crusaders in the National Catholics, earlier 
this season and by the Terriers in the Greater 
Boston Championships just last week. 

B.C., however, was' not to be denied this 
time, as they easily outdistanced Holy Cross. 
B.C. finished with 50 points, 63 points ahead 
of their long time Catholic rivals from 
Worcester. 

Junior Michele Hallett led the Eagle 
runners with a second place finishing time of 
17:53. Senior Ann Fallon was the second 
Eagle runner to cross the line and was the sixth 
place finisher overall. 

Fallon was closely followed by sophomore 
Virginia Connors who finished ninth with a 
time of 18:21. The other women runners also 
fared very well. Mary Helen Peterson, Sharon 
Willis, Jennifer Weeks, and Therese Doucette 
all finished high in the standings from this 37 
team field. 

October 29, 19X4 



360 Friends 



JOSEPH J. MEZZANOTTE 

Alls it: Sciciucs 
B.A. English 



ANGELA MICOZZI 

Sc!u)t)l ol Niiisiiij; 
li.S. Nursing 



GLENN B. MIESZKALSKI 

Alls & Sciences 
U.S. Biology 



JOHN MIHALIK 

Sihoul (;l Maiiat^c-iMciil 
B.S. Marketing 



MARY B. MIHELIC 
Alls & .S( icnc.es 

H.A. Knglish 
Oonirniinicalions 





£. MICHAEL MILLER 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Philosophy 



EDWARD G. MILLER 

Arts &■ Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



JENNIFER MILLER 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.S. Psychcjiogy 



COLLEEN M. MILLERICK 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



ALICE D. MILLS 
.Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Economics 





MAUREEN MILTON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



LEONARD MIRRA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



HOPE V. MIS AIL 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



HELEN MIT A LA 

Evening College 
B.S. Business Administration 



FRANK S. MITCHELL 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 




TIMOTHY A. MITCHELL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



ROBERT MOK 

School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 



CHARLES T. MOLINARY 

School oi Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Finance 



ELIZABETH 
MONAGHAN-DEE 
School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



DAVID J. MONAHAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



Friends 361 



MICHAEL F. MONAHAN DEMISE S. MONDELL 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Geology B.A. English 



PIERRE F. MONETTE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CATHERINE M. 

MONTANA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 



CHRISTOPHER]. 

MONT AN I 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Finance 





MICHELE M. 
MONTRONE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



MARY M. MOONEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



WILLIAM S. MOONEY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



PAULA MOORE 

Evening College 

B.S. Business Management 



RANDALL A. MOORE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




mh£ 




MANUEL V. MORAIS 

Evening College 
B.S. Business Aciministration 



CHRISTOPHER P. 

MORDARSKI 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Physics 

Mathematics 



PATRICIA A. MORESCHI JEFFREY M. MORGAN 
Arts &: Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications B.A. Economics 



DIANE M. MORI ARTY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 




KENNETH JOHN 
MORIARTY 
Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



PAULA F. MORIARTY 

.Arts &r Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



KERRY A. MORONEY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



BRIAN R. MORRILL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Chemistry 



ELLEN MORRIS 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



i 



362 Friends 



■r-* 




If 



.1 



v' 



\l 



\ A 




Wendy Case, Fatty O'Brien. Lisa Kwasniowski 



Monan Accepts Invitation back to Gasson steps from the 

to Cotton Bowl podium in front of the O'Neill 

library last Monday to watch the 

On an unseasonably warm official invitation and acceptance to 

November afternoon, the Boston play New Year's Day in the Cotton 

College Eagles made the obvious Bowl, 
official. B.C. is Cotton Bowl bound. 

An enthusiastic noontime crowd December 3, 1984 
of over 3,000 students stretched 




JAMES P. MORRIS 

Schijol i>l .Maiiaf^ciiiciit 

15. .S. linancc 



MARIA L. MORRIS 

.S( lujol ol ManagciMciii 

15. .S. Marketing 




CAROLYN MORRISSEY 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development 

Communications 



LEO J. MORRISSEY 

.\n!, 8c Sciences 

B.A. English 

Philosophy 





WILLIAM P. MORRISSEY JOHN P. MORSELLINO CATHERINE E. MORTON 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science B.A. English B.A. Psychology 



CHRISTINE A. 
MOSCARITOLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ANITA L. MOSKOWITZ 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 




LUIS CARLOS MOTTA 


YVONNE A. 


JOSEPH M. MOTTOLA 


KRISTIN M. MOYER 


GEORGE J. MOZEK 


School ol Manageinent 


MOTTERSHEAD 


Arts & Sciences 


School of Managemeiu 
B.S. Marketmg 


School of Management 


B.S. Marketing 


Arts & Sciences 


B.S. Economics 


B.S. Computer Science 




B.A. History 




Finance 


Finance 



Friends 363 



MATTHEW MORINC 

MUDD 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 



DAWN L MUELLER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 
Psychology 



GREGORY T. MUELLER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




MATTHEW R. MULCAHY MARY E. MULDOON 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science B.A. Computer Science 




MARIE D. MULLANE 

School of Management 

B.S. Economics 



MARGARET B. 

MULLARKEY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 

Matheniatiis 




RICHARD J. MULLEN STEVEN J. MULLEN 



DAVID P. MULA 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KELLY A. MULCAHY 

School of Education 

B.A. Elem-Special Education 

Theater Arts 




RJ McMahon, Mike Donegan, Suzanne O'Leary 



Arts & .Sciences 
B.S. Phvsics 



School ol Management 

B.S. Finance 

Computer .Science 



To the Victors Belong 
the Spoils: A Cotton 

The Class that Nobody Wanted 
proved themselves for good on a 
blustery, frigid New Year's after- 
noon in 1985. They did it to the 
tune of a 45-28 drubbing of South- 
west Conference C^hampion Hous- 
ton Cougars in front of a rain 
soaked, beleagered crowd in the 
Cotton Bowl. 

The Eagles led from start to 
finish, and except for one brief 
scare (it was 31-28 at one point), the 
Eagles were in total command. 
Sure, Doug Hutie made his pres- 
ence telt, but on this day it would be 
the running of Troy Stradford (196 
yards) and Steve Strachan (93 yards. 
Offensive MVP) that would prove 
to be the difference. 

Fliilie had an a\ci"agc da\ ( I 3-.H7/ 



180 yards), but his poise and 
leadership were felt by the whole 
squad. As for the defense, they 
proved the critics wrong as they 
limited the Houston Veer-T 
offense throughout the game. It 
was a frosh who came to the 
forefront as Linebacker Bill 
Romanowski was named the 
Defensive MVP with 13 tackles. 

So, after two unsuccessful years 
in the College Bowl Extravaganza, 
the Eagles finally came through 
with an impressive post-season 
performance. They proved to be 
the superior team as they 
registered their 10th win of the 
season and secured a spot as one of 
the top five teams in the nation. 
And this was all accomplished by 
The Class that Nobodv Wanted. 

January 21, 198.") 



364 Friends 



SHEILA F. MULLIGAN 

School ol Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



TARA J. MULLINS 

Stliool ol I'xlucaUoii 

li.A. Severe 

Special Needs 



CHRISTINE L. 

MULRONEY 

School o( Echiciilicjii 

B.A. ElcmciUary Kclu<;uioii 



ROBERT J. MULVANEY KATHLEEN j. MULVEY 
School ol ManagcMiciil School ol Maiiagciiicut 

U.S. Accouiitiug B.S. Qi'^'i'l'li'livc Analysis 

Kcoiiomics 




SUSAN M. MUNRO 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 

Mathematics 



ROBERT L. MUNROE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



SHEILAH M. MUNSELL 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development 

Communications 



AUCE M. MURPHY 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Marketing 



ANNE MARIE MURPHY 

.Xrts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




BRIAN A. MURPHY 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



BRIAN J. MURPHY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CHRISTOPHER J. 

MURPHY 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



DONALD MURPHY, JR. 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 



HENRY L. MURPHY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




MARGARET 0. MURPHY 


MAUREEN ANNE 


Arts & Sciences 


MURPHY 


B.A. History 


Arts & Sciences 




B.A. Economics 




History 



MAUREEN ELIZABETH MAUREEN T. MURPHY MICHAEL J. MURPHY 
MURPHY Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

Arts & Sciences V,.A. English B.A. Economics 

B.A. Mathematics Communications 

Computer Science 



Friends 365 



MICHAEL J. MURPHY MICHAELA M. MURPHY MICHELE A. MURPHY 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences School ot Education 

B.A. English B.A. EngHsh B.A. Elemenlary Education 

Elem-Special Education 



CAYLE S. NAAS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance Languages 



ELIZABETH C. NADDAFF 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




PAUL W. NACLE 
Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CHRISTOPHER K. 
NAIRNE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DAVID M. NAKANISHI 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



LISA A. NAPPA 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KEVIN J. NASH 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




TIMOTHY J. NASH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



LISA A. NAZARETIAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 
Communications 



TRACEY A. NEAVE 

.•\rts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



REBECCA R. NEDELKOFF 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



WILLIAM B. 

NEED ELM AN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Geology & Geophysics 




LAWRENCE NEEDLE 
.•\rts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



LYNDA A. NELSON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 



CAROL B. NEWMAN 

.'\rls &! Sciences 

B.A. History 



DAVID W. NEWSHAM 


THIEU NGUYEN 


.\rts & Sciences 

B.S. Economics 

Biology 


.-\rls tVt Sciences 

B.S. Chemistry 

Mathematics 



366 Friends 




RICHARD E. NICKESON 

Alls iV- Siiciucs 
H.A. (^oMinuiiiu aliniis 




ANN MARIE NICOSIA 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




Rose Scardville, Shcrri Gee, Sue Tovvey, Mara Buddy, Vicky Sieh, 
Berta Blaz, Andrea Gagne 



Bowl Dream Comes 

True 

for Eagles' Fans 

I wcnly ciglil seconds and 
M) yards to go wilh Miami 
ahead 45-41. Bcrnie Kosar 
celebrates on ilie sidelines, 
liosioii (College quarlerback 
Doug Huiie drives die Eagles 
to the Hurricane 48. But only 
six ticks remain on the 
Orange Bowl clock. A Miami 
supporter raps his hands ow 
the table in the Pres Box — 
"h's ail over, there's no way ..." 

Flutie calls Flood-Tip 55. 
Head down, Gerard Phelan 
pounds down field — all he 
has to do is get to the end zone 
and magic will happen — con- 
fidence abounds. "There's no 
way, just no way ... ," that 
equally confident man con- 
tinues to scream. Scrambling, 
Flutie sails the ball 64 yards in 
the air to his roommate in the 
endzone. B.C;. 47 Miami 45. 

January 21, 1985 






^t^M 




MICHAEL B. NIEWINSKI 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



PATRICIA A. NIKITIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



CIULIA N OBI LI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



CHARLES H. NOBLE 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



PAUL H. NOBLE 

School of Management 

B.S. General Management 




JOANNE C. NOLAN 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 

English 



JAIME M. NO LAND 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



C. BRENDAN NOON AN 

School of Managcmenl 

B.S. Economics 

Finance 



MICHAEL B.NOONE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



STEPHEN J. NORBERT 

School of Education 

B.A. History 
Secondary Education 



Friends 367 



SUSAN NORTH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KIMBERLY A. NORTON 

Scliool of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 

Computer Science 



PAUL F. NORTON 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



SUZANNE NOTHELFER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



KATHLEEN A. NUNAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 




Mary Fontanello, Koren Thanner, Mildred McGillvray 



Powell Reflects on New Role 
as BC Professor 

What brought you to Boston College to accept 
the chair as the O'Neill Professor of American 
Politics? 

Powell: Well, I suppose the easiest answer to 
that is the invitation. Something like this has 
always interested me both because the idea of 
teaching has always attracted me and because, I 
think, it almost comes with the opportunity to 
work in the White House, or some other place in 
government. That opportunity almost makes an 
obligation to try to plow back later on, what 
you've learned and make it available to young 
people. 

Do you feel the position of Presidential Press 
Secretary prepared you, in any way, to teach? 

Powell: Well, there's a temptation to have fun 
with it, and it was always my impression that the 



White House press corps needed a lot of teach- 
ing. People may say that I didn't do a very good 
job of teaching while I was there. 

No, I think it obviously gave me a chance to see 
up close some things that most Americans don't, 
so it seems to me in that sense maybe I can bring a 
firsthand sort of perspective that is helpful to 
students. But it certainly doesn't prepare you in 
any general sense to teach, on the other hand, 
I'm not sure what does. 

Now, as a working journalist, do you occasion- 
ally sympathize with things that you may have 
criticized as press secretary? 

Powell: I understand much better than I did 
before the pressures and difficulties that journal- 
ists labor under, but in some ways that has made 
me more and not less concerned about journal- 
ism and the way it's practiced. 

February 4, 1985 




LUIS NUNEZ 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




GEORGE J. NUN NO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Communications 

Sociology 




MICHAEL J. NYKLEWICZ 

.'\rts X: S( ieiKcs 

B.A. English 



368 Friends 



HEIDI O'BERDIEK 

Alls & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ANGELA C. O'BRIEN 

Scliool ol Maii.iHiiiRiU 
B.S. I'iiiiiiice 



ANNE M. O'BRIEN ANTHONY F. O'BRIEN CATHERINE M. O'BRIEN 



School ol MaiiJHciiiciiI 
B.S. Markeliiig 



School ol MaiiagetTienl 
B.S. A((()uiuing 



S( hool ol I'.diuaiioij 
l)..'\. KleMieiilaiy I'.ducaliori 




COLLEEN P. O'BRIEN MARY PATRICIA O'BRIEN NORA E. O'BRIEN 

School of Education Arts & Sciences Arts Sc Sciences 

B.A. Human Development B.A. Psychology B.A. Economics 

Communications 



PATRICIA A. O'BRIEN 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



SEAN C. O'BRIEN 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 






\ l 




JULIE A. O'CONNELL 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



MARK O'CONNELL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Philosophy 

English 



NANCY O'CONNELL 

School of Education 

Elementary Ed. 

Special Ed. 



VIRGINIA O'CONNELL WILLIAM F. O'CONNELL 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




DAVID O. O'CONNOR 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JEANNINE M. 

O'CONNOR 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development 



KATHLEEN O'CONNOR KEVIN J. O'CONNOR 
School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Computer Science B.A. Political Science 



AMY L. O'DONNELL 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



Friends 369 



MATTHEW J. 

O'DONNELL 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



PAIGE A. O'CONNELL 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



BRENDAN P. O'DUFFY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Sociology 

History 



DEBORAH A. OCDEN 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



MEGHAN O'HEARN 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 




KAREN E. O'KEEFE 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



SCOTT P. OKONIEWSKI 

Arts &L Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 



LARS W. O LANDER 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ROBERT J. OLEARY SUZANNE M. O'LEARY 

Arts &: Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications B.A. Economics 

Psychology 




DARLENE A. OLMSTEAD 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



SHELLEY L. OLSEN 

.Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



PAUL L. ONDERDONK 

.'Arts ii: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



TARA D. O'NEIL 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



BRIG ID B. O'NEILL 

.Arts S: Sciences 
B.A. English 




EDWARD P. O'NEILL 

Arts & .Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



JOHN C. O'NEILL 

.School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



LI AM O'REILLY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



PATRICIA M. O'REILLY 

Arts & .Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



TRICIA M. O'REILLY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. EnglLsh 



370 Friends 




JOHN R. ORR 

School ol Maii.igiiiK'iU 

B.S. Acrouiuiiig 

Finance 



MARY T. O'SHEA 

School ol M.ni.iniiTicnl 
B.S. Accounting 




JEAN O' TOOLE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 

English 



PHILIP R. OTTAVIANI 

School of Management 
B.S. General Management 




Rcjllie Peiea, Amy Clasby. Bill .Marx inkiewic;/ 



University Proposes 
Stricter Alcohol Policy 

The University is in the process 
of forming a new alcohol policy 
that will prohibit kegs on campus, 
limit the number of guests per 
resident attending parties, and 
restrict the Hillside apartments, 
Modulars and the ninth floor of 
Edmonds to senior residents only. 
Parties with alcohol will be 



restricted to these areas. 

The policy, to be implemented 
next year, comes in the wake of a 
Massachusetts law which will go 
into effect June 1 increasing the 
drinking age to 21. The law will 
sharply decrease the number 
students eligible to drink on 
campus. 

February 1 1, 1985 





THOMAS B. OTTO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MICHAEL J. PADDEN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance Languages 

Economics 



CATHERINE B. PACE 
School of Education 
B.A. Early Childhood 



ROSEMARIE PALADINO JOAN M. PALLADINO 
School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Marketing B.A. Economics 

Human Resources Management 





JOHN S. P ALLIES 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



KATHERINE J. PALMER 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



LISA A. PALMIERI 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



LAURA A. PANKEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



DAWN M. PA NT A NO 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



Friends 371 



CRETCHEN M. 

PAPACODA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



CATHERINE F. PAPSO MONiaUE A. PAaUETTE JENNIFER L. PAROUS DEBORAH L. PARENTE 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Psychology B.A. Mathematics B.A. C^ommiuiications B.A. Mathematics 

Computer Science 




JOHN PAUL PARIS I 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



SOUNC J. PARK 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



STEPHEN D. PARISI 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Computer Science 




SUSAN C. PARKER 

Arts ii: Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




\M m 



KATHLEEN M. PARKS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



DAVID J. PARRELLA 

School o( Management 
B.S. Finance 




Maureen Mara, Mike Grant 



McCready, Eagles 
Stun Villanova, 62-61 

Boston College 62 Villanova 61. 

This just might be the ticket to 
the NCAA tournament for the 
Boston College Eagles. 

When Wildcat forward Harold 
Pressley missed a 20 foot jumper 
with four seconds left in the game 
and Roger McCready cradled the 
rebound, Roberts Center broke 
into pandemonium as B.C. coach 
Gary Williams and his team 
embraced in jubilation on the floor. 

A Michael Adams layup off a 
Dominic Pressley steal and nifty 
feed with 50 seconds remaining in 
the game gave the Eagles their first 
lead of the second half. 

Villanova then called two time 
outs, one with 34 seconds remain- 
ing, and the other with 17 seconds 
left. 



After the second time out, Villa- 
nova attempted to get the ball in- 
side to either Ed Pinkney or 
Dwayne McClain, but the B.C. 
defense was set up to deny that op- 
tion. Unable to get into the paint, 
Pressley was forced to take a long 
jumper, a shot not known to be his 
best weapon. 

"It was surprising that they held 
the ball that long. It took a lot of 
confidence," said B.C.'s Pressley 
after the game. "We wanted them 
to think about what they had to do. 
We knew what we had to do." 

"We were fortunate. They are a 
senior team and they could have hit 
the last shot and beat us," sighed 
Williams. 

"Its a step closer to the NCAA's," 
exclaimed Adams in the exuberant 
B.C. locker. 

FeburaryJ9, 1983 



372 br lends 



J 





DAVID A. PARTRIDGE 

Alts & Scicntes 

B.A. Kconomics 

Romance Languages 



ELAINE F. PASCAL 

Alls &: Sciences 

11. A. Knglish 

Romance Languages 



JOHN P. PASKOWSKI JOSEPH K. PASSANANTE SUSAN L. PASSIOS 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Matlieiiialics 



S{ hf)o) oi M.iiiagcinciil 

15. S. Maikeiiiig 

(^(nii[)iiler .St ience 



Alls & .St it-nces 
B.A. I'sychology 




MARC A. PASSMANN MARYBETH PATTERSON 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



An & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 
Cotnmunications 



MARYBETH PAUL 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 
Psychology 



STEPHEN PEACH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



DIAHNEJ. PEARSALL 

Sihool ol Management 
B.S. Marketing 




ANNE M. PECEVICH 

Schoo of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



JONC-KWAN PECK 

School ot Management 

B.S. Finance 



PATRICIA ANN 
PEDERSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KATHERINE PELAEZ 

Arts Sc Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



DEMETRI JOHN PELIDIS 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development 

History 




JOAN M. PEMBROKE 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ANTON ELLA PEN A 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Economics 



STEVEN M. PEN A 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



MICHAEL A. 

PENNACHIO 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 



ANDREA F. PEPE 

School fjf Management 
B.S. Marketing 



Friends 373 



JUDYANN A. PERALTA 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



ANNEMARIE PEREIRA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ERIC PEREZ 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



ALFONSO A. PERILLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



BRICITTE PERROTTA 

School ol Education 
B.A. Early Childhood 








GREGORY J. PESCE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KIRSTEN L. PETERSEN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CHERYL L. PETERSON 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



CHRISTIAN J. PETIT MARIA RITA P. PETRI LLO 
Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Chemistry B.S. Biology 




KENNETH W. PFEIFFER SANDRA A. PHILLIPS 

Evening College 
B.S. Management 



Evening College 
B.S. Business Administration 



MARKS. PICOT 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



DIANA A. PIERCE 

School of Education 

B.A. English 
Human Development 



LOUISE C. PIERCE 

School of Management 

B.S. General Management 




WAYNE D. PIERS 
.•\rls & Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



LISA A. PIETRANGELI BARRY MICHAEL PIKE 



.School of .Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



.^rts & Sciciui-s 
B.A. Political .Science 



JOEL B. PINA 

School of Manageincnl 

B.S. Accounting 



ROBIN P. PINSTEIN 

S( hool of Managemeril 

B.S. Marketing 

Computer .Science 



374 Friends 




Maureen Ryan, Chris Liibanski, Del^bie Parente, Irene Ryan, Kristin, Kerry 
Morony 



Baptist Home to be B.C. Dorm 

(it) (Jornnionwcallh Avenue, Ibrmerly llic 
l')apli.sl Home, will liouse students next lail 
and will be underj^oing renovations 
s(iiedulefi lo be completed early this 
summer, according to Director of 
liuildings and Grounds Fred Pennirxj. 

Kxpected to house about 150 students 
next year, the building is currently being 
offered as housing under Category IV, 
which includes rooms in (ireycliff anrl 
Shawn House and residence halls singles, 
triples, or quads and will be available 
through the lottery April 13. The renova- 
tions necessary to prepare the facility for 
student living are expected to cost approxi- 
mately $300,000, Pennino said. 

Described as "something very new in 
University Housing" in the Lottery in- 
formation booklet, 66 Commonwealth 
Avenue will offer 135 single rooms. 
Currently there are less than 20 single 
rooms in campus hrjusing. 

"This will be a substantial increase and 
will be attractive to upperclassmen, particu- 
larly seniors," said acting Director of Hous- 
ing, Robert Capalbo. 

March 25, 1985 





BRAN J. PISACICH 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



PRISCILLA B. PLUMMER 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



CHRISTINE POKORNY 
School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



JAMES P. POLERECKY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



KIM A. POLK 

School oi Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 





ELIZABETH S. PONCE 

School (il Management 

B.S. Economics 

Marketing 



CRISOLITA H. PONTES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



JOSEPH J. POPOLIZIO CECELIA A. PORCH E 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MARY PORTER 

Evening College 
B.S. Business Admimistratior. 



Friends 375 




JULIE M. PORZIO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CRAIG A. POSTON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ELAINE M. POWER 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketnig 



BARRY F. POWERS 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketnig 



KAREN POWERS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

History 




Kelly Murphy, Maggie Mullarky, Kelly Fitzpatrick, Kristie Lagerstrom 



Trustees Gives the Go-Ahead 
On Plans for University Center 

The building of a student union at B.C. came 
one step closer to realization Tuesday after a 
subcommittee of the Boston College Board of 
Trustees reacted favorably to a Student Space 
Task Force presentation. 

According to Buildings and Properties 
Committee Chairman Thomas Flatley and Task 
Force Chairman Karen Lussier, the Committee 
responded positively to the task force's presenta- 
tion on the need for such a center. Committee 
members suggested the task force research other 
college's student centers and select a space 
planner/designer/architect. 

"It was very enlightening," said Flatley 
Company, a construction firm. "Our committee 
felt very positive about it. They brought out the 
picture very clearly of what the need is." 

"When the highest board in the University says 



OK, you know you're in good shape," UGBC 
President Jeff Thielman said Friday. 

It is too early to say whether the need for a 
student center would be met by the renovation of 
McElroy or another building on campus or 
would require the construction of a new facility, 
Flatley said. 

It is also not clear how much money B.C. 
would have to spend to come up with a 
University Center But Flatley said money for the 
center will not be an obstacle to its being built. 

"Money has never been an obstacle too achiev- 
ing a needed goal at B.C.," Flatley emphasized. 
"Need will be considered equally with cost." He 
added the committee has recommended the ex- 
penditure of $30,000 for the planning of the 
University Center which shows a commitment to 
building the facility. 

Ma'rch 25, 1985 




SHEILA M. POWERS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 




ANA M. PRADO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 
Communications 




DOMINIC PRECOPIO 

F.viriing (^)lk-gi- 
B.S. Ciencral Manageinenl 



376 Friends 



PATRICIA A. 

PRENDIVILLE 

School ol Management 

B.S. Atcounting 



GENEVIEVE A. PROSPER 

Alls & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



ALE XI OS 
PROTONOTARIOS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



ELLEN M. PROVOST 

School ol Ninsing 

B.S. Ninsing 



MARC C. PUCLIESE 

School o( MaMagenieril 
B.S. Finance 

Marketing 





MICHELE M. PULLIA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



MICHELLE A. PU LSI PER 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




JANET THERESE 

PUSHKAL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Political Science 




MARIA aUALTERE 

School ot F.diicalion 

B.A. Early Chlcl.-Special Ed. 

Moderate Special Needs 



SARA E. aUAY 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Philosophy 




MICHAEL aUE 

School of Managaement 

B.S. Accounting 



MARY B. aUICLEY 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



PATRICIA M. aUINN 
School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



PETER QUIRK 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



ROBERT J. RAFFAELE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Economics 





MARY JO RAIA 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 



JOSEPH A. RAMIREZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MARIA JUDITH RAMOS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



WILLIAM MARK 

RANDELL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 



DIANNE J. RAN NO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



Friends 377 



ELISABETH S. RARING 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




MICHAEL L. RASKIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Political Science 



ANTHONY WILLIAM 

RAVOSA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



JACaUELINE A. 

RAY BUCK 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



MARK J. RAZA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 




MAURA E. REARDEN KATHLEEN M. REDCATE SUSAN M. REDZNAK 
Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. History B.S. Accounting 



B.A. Communications 



f-a^^F ^".'^r 



ERNESTO D. RECALADO NOREEN M. REGAN 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 



FRANK A. REED 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



TANJI P. REED 
Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 




B.A. Philosophy 



B.S. Finance 



THOMAS J. REIDY 


ANN MARIE REILLY 


JOHN L REILLY 


Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 


School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




KATHLEEN M. REILLY 

School ol .Management 
B.S. Marketing 



PETER A. REILLY 
Arts & Sciences 
B..'\. Economics 



THOMAS J. REINDL KATHERINE A. REITH JOAN F. RENEHAN 

S( hool of Maii.igemenl .\rts & Sciences 

B.S. Marketing B.A. Fkonomics 



.Arts it Sciences 
B.A. RomaiKc languages 



378 Friends 





DIANE L. RENCUCCI 

Scliool ol M.iii.iucniciil 

B.S. Cioiiipuni Science 

Markclinu; 



KARA E. RENNER 

AiLs ii; Scic'iucs 
B.S. Biology 




THOMAS F. RESTIVO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 

Mathematics 




MARGARET M. 

REYNOLDS 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



CABRIELA E. REYES 

.■\rls &■ Sciences 
B.A. Romance Languages 



W^ 


w 




i^«* 




DARRIN M. REZNICK 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 




Marianne McManama 



Pyramid Mania Hits B.C. 
Campus 

An illegal gambling scheme has 
riveted through Boston College, 
involving at least 1,000 students 
and tens of thousands of dollars. 
Called "The Corporation," this 
"pyramid" chain investment scam 
has cost B.C. undergraduates at 
least $60,000, according to figures 
collected by The Heights, while a 
miniumum of 75 students are 
known to have obtained payments 
of $800. 

The gambling scheme apparent- 
ly began three weeks ago, brought 
onto campus by B.C. juniors after 
spring break, according to several 
students interviewed. Once cogni- 
zant of this money-making scam, 
individuals, including a number of 
seniors, started their own pyramids 



rather than investing in the initial 
one. It has spilled over to other 
colleges in Boston, including 
Northeastern University, Pine 
Manor College, Bentley College, 
Boston University, Brandeis 
University, and Babson College. 

Under Chapter 271, Sec 6A of 
the Massachusetts statues, it is 
illegal to "promote a plan by which 
. . . anything of value is sold to a 
person for a consideration that the 
purchaser agrees to secure . . . 
more persons to participate in the 
plan by making similar purchases." 
Violation of this statue can bring 
up to three years in a State Prison 
and a fine up to $3,000, since it is 
considered a felony in the state of 
Massachusetts. 

April I, 1985 





KATHRYN A. RICE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Psychology 



':f#f 



/ 



PAMELA T. RICE 

School ol Kdutalion 
B.A. Human Development 






COLLEEN RICHARD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Coinmunications 



TORRI A. RICHARDS 

.\ns & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



MARYBETH 
RICHARDSON 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Accounting 



Friends 379 





^ 




PETER J. RICHTER 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Economics 



ANNE C. RICKARD 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 



GEORGE A. RICO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A, History 



LISA A. RIDGWAY 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



PATRICIA A. RIEHL 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Economics 




JOSEPH F. RIGA 
Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Mathematics 




JOAN E. RIGDON 
Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 



MAUREEN K. RILEY 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Childhood-Special 

Ed. 



ANNE L. RINEHART 

School of Education 
B.A. Elementary Education 



MARY E. RING 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 




Patrice Kelly, Caroline Long, Donna Masek, Margaret LaForgia 



Peter Thomas Elected 
1985 UGBC President 

The champagne bottles 
were uncorked in Edmonds 
311 Tuesday night, as Peter 
Thomas announced his 
victory over Tom Grace — 
making him the UGBC 
President for 1985-86. With 
campaign workers, friends 
and parents present, Thomas 
jubilantly thanked everyone 
involved. 

Thomas was also appointed 
as Chairman of the Hand- 
icapped Committee, in which 
he is still actively involved. 
Last summer Thomas be- 
came an integral part in 
organizing the "Run, Jeff, 
Run" campaign in which B.C. 
alumnus Jeff Keith ran across 
the United States for hand- 
icap awareness. 

April i; 1985 




GLORIA M. RIONDA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 

Mathematics 




SANDRA R. RIPLEY 

S( liool of Managemcnl 

B.S. Marketing 

Computer Science 



380 I'rinuL 





£^iJk 




LISA A. RITZINCER 

Alls &■ SiiciKis 
B.A. Psychology 



NINA C. RIVERA 

Alls X: Si iciK cs 
B.A. I'sythology 



LEONARD L. RIZY 

,\ns & .Si Ji-iKcs 
B.A. M.ilhcnialics 



LAURA A. RIZZIERE 

S< I loo! ol NiMMiig 
B.S. NursinfT 



MAPJA ANTONETTA 

RIZZO 

Alls & .Siicntes 

B.A. I'oliiital .Science 




RAYMOND F. RIZZO 


RITA E. ROACH 


CASEY L. ROBERTS 


JOHN F. ROBERTS 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 


Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 


School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



DANIEL J. ROBERTSON 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




JENNIFER A. ROBINS MAUREEN C. ROBINSON SCOTT ROBINSON 

Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance Languages B.A. Communications B.S. Chemistry 



MARIO A. ROBLES 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



PATRICIA M. ROCHE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



PHILIP P. ROCHE GISELLE M. RODRIGUEZ JOHN J. ROGERS, III 

School of Management School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Finance B.S. Finance B.A. Economics 




ANDREA L. ROCANELLI 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Philosophy 




f0^ 



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1 



r 



i 



MICHELE K. ROGERS 

School of Education 
B.A. Elem-Special Education 



Friends 381 







% 




MONiaUE ROGERS 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



LUIS F. ROLDAN 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



ANNEMARIE R. ROMAN DONNA M. ROMANEK 

School of Management Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Finance B.A, Communications 

Marketing 



JANINE MARIE 

ROMAN IW 

School of Education 

B.A. Elementary Education 

Elem-Special Education 




JAMES P. ROMANO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ROBIN L. ROMANO 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



JAMES M. ROMERO, JR. 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



ERIKAJ. ROMO 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



RAFAEL C. ROMUALDEZ 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 




MARK PAUL RON AN 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Romance Languages 



STEPHEN M. ROSA 

.Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JANE ROUVAPES 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KEVIN P. ROWE 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



RHONDA A. ROY 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 




CINDY M. RUMRILL 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MICHAEL A. RUSS 

School of Management 

B.S. Economics 

Finance 



CAROLINE A. RUSSELL 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



THOMAS RUSSELL 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



SALVATORE A. RUSSO 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



382 Frirmk 



I 




ANDREW THOMAS 

RYAN, IX 

Alls & Sciences 

B.A. Film 




DAVID M. RYAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 
Political Science 



COLLEEN A. RYAN 

Arts ^- Scic'iucs 

B.A. Sociology 

Psychology 



:&i' 




IRENE H. RYAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Sociology 

Economics 




Maura Rearden, Nancy Ciudaiiis, Aiidrca S<hiai<jiii, Maura Ojiiiiaia, 
Tara Ryan 



Groups Meet To Finalize 
Alcohol Policy 

All parties involved with the 
formulation of the revised alcohol 
policy met last Monday to resolve 
the inconsisencies that arose as a 
result of multiple policies circulat- 
ing throughout the campus by 
various offices. However, UCiBC is 
not satisfied with the outcome. 



LGiiC Frcsidciil Fclci 1 lujiiias 
expressed disgust with the 
administration's attitude at the 
meeting. "I went into the meeting 
representing the students' 
feelings," said thomas. "Whatever I 
brought up was consistently shot 
down. They have no consideration 
for the students' feelings." 

September 16, 1985 







MAUREEN RYAN 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Romance Languages 



MICHAEL A. RYAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



RICHARD J. RYAN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



ROBERT H. RYAN 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



SIOBHAN RYAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 




TARA-ANN RYAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




^ I5r 



v"-^ 



\ ! 

JAMES L. RYDER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theology 




ANDREE RZEWNICKI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



PAUL M. SAIA 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



TAN I A SALMEN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Sociology 

Psychology 



Friends 383 



THOMAS M. SALMON 

School of Managemem 

B.S. Accounting 



WENDY J. SALMONSON MATTHEW P. SALVATORE 
School of Nursing Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Nursing B.S. Biology 



CAROL SAMPSON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



LISA SAMUELSEN 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




OLCA E. SANCHEZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



VIVIAN A SANCHEZ 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



MICHAEL W. 
S A NT AG AT A 

\ni & Sciences 
B.A. English 



SUSAN J. S A NT AM ARIA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



LINDA C. SANTIAGO 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 




Students Celebrate While Hurricane Rages 



Strains of U2's Gloria 
were heard from dorms as 
Boston College residents 
prepared to face the long- 
awaited Hurricane Gloria, 
which swept across New 
England Friday. 

Classes were cancelled 
Friday morning after 
Massachusetts was 
declared a state of 
emergency in preparation 
for the storm, which 
crossed through the 
central part of the state 
that afternoon with winds 
up to 150 miles per hour. 

There were many hurri- 
cane parties on campus as 
the storm and class cancel- 
lations gave B.C. students 
an excuse to celebrate. 

September 30, 1985 



384 l-ru'n(Ls 



ANA M. SANTISO 


MICHAEL D. SANTOS 


ANTOINETTE N. 


PETER SARRAM 


JERILYN M. SASEK 


Alls X; Scit'iucs 
B.A. English 


Alls c<.- SdflKl-S 

B.A. English 
Conimunications 


SARNACCHIARO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 


.Alts i<- .S( iciK es 
B.A. Kcoiioiiiics 


Alls S: .S( iciiies 
B..S. Biology 




CARLTON R. SAULS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



KAREN A. SAVOCA 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



MARY S. SCANLON 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



LAURA A. SCAN NELL 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 




ROSEMARY F. 

SCARDVILLE 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 




AMY ELIZABETH SCHALL 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



FREDERICK F. 
SCHAUDER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



DEIRDRE O. SCHAUS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



CHRISTINE SCHEFFERT ANDREA J. SCHIAVONI 
School of Education School of Nursing 

B.A. Elementary Education B.S. Nursing 





1^ ^ 



STUART j. SCHUR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JOHN E. SCHWECMAN WENDY L. SCHWENKER PAUL J. SCOBIE 

School of Management Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.S. Marketing B.A. History B.S. Finance 

Computer Science Human Resources Management 



JOSEPH S. SCORDINO 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



Friends 385 




GERALD SEAWARD 

Evening College 
B.A. Computer Science 



KEITH D. SEELY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



CHRIS ANN SEFCHICK 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketmg 



MARK D. SEMAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Chemistry 

Economics 



S EM IRA SEMI NO 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 




BRIAN L. SEN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



KIM5ERLEE SERRANO 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



MILTON L SHAPIRO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Theology 



COLLEEN M. SHEA 

-Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 



ROBERTA A. SESSA 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



LAURA L SHANNON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Political Science 



STUART A. SHANUS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 




Mkd 




JOHN M. SHEA 

Arts it Sciences 
B.A. History 



NEIL J. SHEA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



DEIRDRE M. SHEEHAN 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




MARY J. SHEEHAN 

Arts & .Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 



JAMES L. SHEEHY 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 





VALERIE K. SHEPPARD PATRICIA A. SHEPTOCK RICHARD C. SHERIDAN 

School of Education Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Human Development B.A. English B.A. English 

Economics 



386 Friends 




Tim Genirs, Jeanie O'Toole 



Top Ranked B.C. Aims 
For a National Title 

This Saturday, October 26th, the 
Boston (Joilcgc hocicey team hegins 
its pursuit for a national title by talcing 
on the University of Marine Black 
Bears in tfie opening contest foi 1 985- 
86 season. 

Last season, the P^agles were able to 
advance all the way to the I'inal i'our 
in Detroit, before being eliminated by 
Providence College. 

This season, B.C. head coach Len 
Ceglarski and Co. have plenty of 
reason for optimisim. In fact 
Celgarski is not the only one who 
thinks the Eagles will have a successful 
season. In the annual coaches poll 
B.C. finished second and in the media 
poll the Eagles were picked first in the 
nation. 

Offensively the Eagles appear solid. 
The 240 goals scored last year was 
team records, and many of those goals 
were scored by returning lettermen. 

October_21,.1985 




SUZANNE M. SHERIDAN 

Alls & .Sciences 
li.A. F.nglish 




CAYLE A. SHILALE 

School ol Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 




Wl^ 


'* M 


mk 


p 


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■ 


\ 


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SUSAN D. SHIMKUS 

School of Education 

B.A. Early 

Chld-Special Ed. 



KAREN C. SHIN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



AUDREY B. SHORT 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Art History 



KELLY M. SHORT 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Philosophy 



JENNIFER D. SIBLEY 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




RICHARD M. SICA 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 





£\k^^ 




CAROL A. SICBALDI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



DAVID R. SICOTTE 

.'\rts Sc Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Economics 



MARC E. SIEGEL 

.Arts &: Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



TRUDI M. SIEGMANN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biochemistry 



Friends 387 





VICTORIA SIEH 

School of Manaeement 

B.S. Marketing 



MICHAEL T. SILK 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



CARLOS A. SILVA 
School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



VINCENT A. SILVESTRI 

Art.s & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Computer Science 



KATHLEEN M. SIMARD 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 




DONALD A. SIMONEAU MICHAEL S. SINICKI 
School of Management School of Management 



B.S. Computer Science 
Finance 



B.S. Marketing 




MARY K. SIPPLE 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 
Communications 



BARBARA C. SIRICNANO 

.Arts & Science 

B.A. Computer Science 





CATHLEEN E. SISK 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



ANN M. SKOCZENSKI 

.School of Kducation 

B.A. Human Development 

Psychology 




Maureen Ward, Ceci Glavin, Dawn Hanaway, Suzanne O'Leary 



Students Head Off Campus to 
Escape University 
Restrictions 

The recent concern about the 
new Massachusetts drinking age of 
21 and the alcohol policies on 
campus has sparked the migrate 
off campus for their social activi- 
ties. 

Seniors in the Mods and 
Hillsides have no legal barrier to 
prevent them from drinking, but 
are faced with University restric- 
tions. Such restrictions include 
only three registered parties per 
night (weekends only) in the Mods 
and the same number in the 
Hillside apartments, one 
registered keg per 50 people, and 



making the residents responsible 
for their guests. Residents are 
liable for minors and any incidents 
involving their guests. 

John Reilly explains how he and 
other seniors are dealing with this 
situation. Reilly said his Mod held a 
small party and he and his 
roommates plan to have another, 
but does not plan to have enough 
guests to require that they register 
it. 

A fellow Mod resident, Kirsten 
Peterson said, "I think a lot of 
seniors will go off campus and what 
scares me is that they will drive off 
campus." 

September 16, 1 985 



388 Friends 



DA WN M . SKORCZEWSKI JILL SLA YTON 

Alts it Science .School ol Ecliiauion 

B.A. English B.A. Elementary Education 



BETH A. SMALL 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economies 



SUSAN M. SMALL 

School ol Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



MARTHA M. SMILLIE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. An liisiory 

History 




ANDREW C. SMITH 

School of Managenieni 
B.S. Accounting 



BRADFORD C. SMITH 

.^rts ii; Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



CAROLYN A. SMITH 
Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 



CHRISTINE M. SMITH CHRISTOPHER R. SMITH 

Arts &: Sciences .Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology B.A. Economics 




DAVID W. SMITH 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Computer Science 



CLEN P. SMITH 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 



KENNETH J. SMITH 

Schcjol ol Education 

B.A. Human Development 

Theology 



KRISTIN SMITH 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 



MARILYN A. SMITH 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 







PAMELA J. SMITH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



DONNA M. SMIY 

School ol Management 
B.S. Marketing 



KAREN M. SNOW 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



JOORI SOHN 

School ol Management 

B.S. Accounting 



MARIANNE SOLD A 

School of Education 

B.A. Elem-Special Education 



Friends 389 



STEPHEN M. SOLOMON STEVEN A. SOLVILETTI PATRICIA SOMMERLAD KAREN E. SORRENTO PATRICIA M. SPECKHART 
Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences School of Education School of Nursing School of Education 



B.A. Political Science 



B.S. Biology 



B.A. Elementary Education 
Elem-Special Education 



B.S. Nursing 



B.A. Human Development 




MARK T. SPELLMAN 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Finance 



SUSAN E. SPERA 

School of Education 

B.A. Severe 

Special Needs 



JEANNE A. SPRANG 
Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Communications 



EDWIN R. SPURCAS 
School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



DOUGLAS W. SaUASONI 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 









PATRICIA A. ST. GEORGE LAWRENCE P. STADULIS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



MICHELLE STAHLIE 

\m &: Sciences 

B.A. Romance Languages 

Communications 



ERNEST D. STALZER 

School ol Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MARY E. STANTON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



.. "1 




RICHARD P. STANTON CYNTHIA D. STAPP LEIGH A. STEINBRINK DIANE E. STEINKAMP KRISTIN E. STEINKRAUSS 

.Arts & Sciences School of Education School of Managemeni .'\rls & Sciences Si hool ol Managemeiu 

B.A. English li.A. Elem-Special Education B.S. Marketing B.A. English B.S. Marketing 
Philosophy 



390 Friends 




PETER M. STEINMANN 

Alls X: S( iciK cs 
B.A. Kcoiiomics 



PAUL H. STENBERC 

Stlidol ol MaiuigciiKMil 
U.S. Marketing 




TIMOTHY J. STEPANEK ANN MARIE STEPHANOS 
School of Management School of Nursnig 

B.S. Accounting B.S. Nursing 

Computer Science 



Natasha Kirby, Marybeth Mangan, Karen Wendelkin, Kellie Walkamo, 
Susie Mae Katis, Rosa Fina, Barbara Dichiara 



C(mimnitary 

School Pride And Spirit 

I remember when I was in high 
school baci< in New York, (Brotiklyn 
Technical H.S. for all the curious) 
the school felt, (who specifically I 
don't know) that there was a need 
to revitalize the image of the school 
in the eyes of the public, who con- 
tained future Technites and in the 



eyes of die students already in the 
school. What this all culminated 
into was a Pride and Spirit 
campaign. Now how successful this 
campaign was is not what I want to 
focus on; rather what I want to talk 
about is the meaning of pride and 
spirit and how these two abstract 
factors affect a school. 

October 21, 1985 




CRAIG M. STEPHEN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



BRIAN M. STEVENS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



THOMAS P. STEVENS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



DEBORAH S. STICKLE CAROL R. STICLMEIER 

School of Education Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Elem-Special Education B.A. English 




LAUREEN STOLTENHOFF 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



TROY E. STRADFORD 

.-\rts &: Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



KATHLEEN E. 
ST RA HORN 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



VOLMA T. STRAKER 

School of Management 
B.S. Economics 



MICHAEL D. STROJNY 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. History 



Friends 391 



FRANCIS S. STRUEBER ALEXANDER J. STRYSKY MICHEAL J. STUTZMAN ANDREA F. SULLIVAN CATHERINE R. SULLIVAN 

Arts &: Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. Psychology B.S. Biology B.A. Political Science B.A. Philosophy B.A. Biology 

Psychology 




DAVID N. SULLIVAN 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 




JAMES F. SULLIVAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Philosophy 

Psychology 




JOHN L. SULLIVAN 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 




Ann Marie Pereira, Mary Ring, Chris Hippeli, Kathy Pelaez, Sandy Ripley 



Big East Review 

Harriers Make History 

With Three Titles 

It was like hoping your friends would 
remember your birthday, and instead you 
received a surprise party, complete with birthday 
cake and dancing girl to go with it. 

More or less, that is what it was like for Boston 
College track coach Jack McDonald when his 
Eagles entered the Big East Track and Field 
Championships at Franklin Park. He hoped his 
team would capture at least one title; instead 
Boston College came away with three . . . out of 
four possible championships. 

Never before in the seven year history of Big 
East track and field has one tournament been so 
dominated by one school. Six schools 
(Providence, 1980, 1982, and 1984; Villanova, 
1983, 1984; and Boston College, 1982) have 
been able to win at least two championships but 



Saturday B.C. led by John Clopeck and Michelle 
Hallett who took both the men's and women's in- 
dividual titles, won the women's team title, thus 
becoming the first school to bring home three. 

Defending champion Villanova entered the 
women's meet undefeated and ranked ninth in 
the country. They had won the Catholic 
Nationals (finishing 52 points ahead of second 
place Marquette), placing five of their runners in 
the top seven. Lauren Searby took top honors. 
The Wildcats were heavy favorites entering the 
race. The Eagle confidence factor wasn't helped 
any when, minutes before the race, freshman 
Gina Braz, the team's number four runner, was 
forced to withdraw because of a leg injury. This 
forced the B.C. women runners up a spot. 

The Eagles won with 35 points, finishing 21 
points ahead of second place Villanova. 
Georgetown was third with 81. 

November 4, 1985 



392 Friends 



KEVIN P. SULLIVAN 

Alls & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 



LAURA K. SULLIVAN 

StliDoi 1)1 Manageiiieiil 

B.S. Marketing 



MARK V. SULLIVAN 

Alts & Sciences 

B.A. History 



MARTHA P. SULLIVAN PAUL L. SULLIVAN 



.S( IkjoI oI ImIik aliori 
B.A. IlLini.ni DcvelopMiciii 



SdiDoi III .\laiia(^cii]CiU 
B.S. Marketing 




SUSAN T. SULLIVAN MARTHA C. SUMBERC JULIE A. SURMAN 

School of Education .Km, & Sciences .School of Etlutation 

B.A. Human Developineiu B.A. English B.A. Elementary Education 



DIANE M. SUSKI 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



ROBERT E. SWEENEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 









LISA M. SYLVIA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



MAUREEN M. SYLVIA 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Maketing 



VICTORIA SZABO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



JULIE A. SZEKELY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Romance Languages 



PATRICIA A. SZOKA 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 





CHRISTINE A. SZOSTAK MICHEL K. SZUSTAK ROBERT J. SZYMANSKI 

Arts & Sciences .School of Nursing Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology B.S. Nursing B.S. Chemistry 



ELIZABETH TABER 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 



JAMIE L. TAFT 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketing 



Friends 393 




MARGARET J. TACGART 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JAMES j. TAGLIA 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



LIZANNE C. TAGUE 

School of Education 

B.A. Human Development 

Communications 



TARA L. TAMNEY 

School of Management 

B.S. Qtiantitative Analysis 




I 



SUSAN M. TARDANICO 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

English 




CHRISTOPHER M. 

TAYLOR 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



JENNIFER M. TAYLOR 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Philosophy 



JUSTIN NICHOLAS 
TAYLOR 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



M. EILEEN TAYLOR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Romance Languages 



MATTHEW A. TAYLOR 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 




WENDY A. TERPEN INC 

Arts Sc Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



pr^^ 



BRYAN ;. TERPSTRA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



LISA O. TERRY 

Arts 8c Sciences 
B.S. Psychology 



THOMAS P. TEVNAN 

,\rls it Sciences 

B.A. History 
Political Science 



KRISTEN C. THIBODEAU BERNADETTE M. THIE 
School fjf Education Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Elem-Special Education B.A. Mathematics 



JAMES D. THOMAS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



PETER W. THOMAS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



KOREN I. THANNER 

Arts &z Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 




CHRISTINE M. 

THOMPSON 

School ()l Management 

B.S. Finance 



394 Friends 




Sue Sinall. Caroline Russell, Angela Mitozzi 



Reverend Gorman Enriched 
Nursing Field 

Nothing in Reverend Edward 
Gorman's youth foretold the 
commitment to nurses he 
developed as an adult. There were 
no nurses in his family, nor ex- 
periences which required nursing 
care. Neither was choice operative. 
Boston College nurses might never 
have known him, had he been the 
only one deciding his life's path. 
His dedication to nurses sprang 
from an earlier commitment; it was 
imbedded in his promises to his 
preisthood. Born in obedience, 
Gorman's ministry to nurses grew 
in love, nurturing the young 
people who had decided that 
service to humanity was a valid way 
to spend a life. 



Gorman was born July 6, I'JIb. 
The Gormans moved several times 
in the next few years and added 
Jerry, John and Catherine to the 
family circle. After holding various 
jobs in his early work life, the elder 
Gorman entered the building 
trades as a carpenter. With this skill 
he made a decent living for his 
family, while his wife made the 
home. 

The couple had been married in 
St. Thomas Aquinas Church, and 
lived their entire married life 
within its boundaries. The church 
was their place of worship, as well 
as the center for much of their so- 
cial life. Music was an important 
part of family life, and had many 
outlets in the church. 

Noverfibier 4, 1985 




^^^^k 



KENNETH T. TIANCCO 

Arlr> & SiicMccs 
U.S. Biology 



PAUL A. TIERNEY 

Arls ik Si i<-n<cs 
B.A. I'olilical SticiiLC 




DAVID A. TIERNO 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Marketing 



DAVID C. Tl LUNCH AST 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Psychology 

Biology 




CATHERINE M. TO BIN 

School of Nmsing 

B.S. Nursing 



MAURICE J. TOBIN 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 




RICHARD A. TOELKE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 
Political Science 



FATEMEH TOOSSI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



REBEKAH TOSADO 

.•\rts & Sciences 
B.A. History 



SUSAN J. TOT A 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



SUSAN E. TOWEY 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



Friends 395 



JOSHUA S. TRACEY 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JOSEPH P. TRACERT 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Economics 

Philosophy 



ANDREW A. TRAIETTI 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



DAWN P. TRAINOR 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ELIZABETH P. TRAINOR 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Romance 

Languages 




THANH N. TRAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Computer Science 

Mathematics 



STEPHEN P. TRAPILO 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Sociology 



STEVEN R. TREPP 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



SUZANNE T. TRICCA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



JULIET C. TROFI 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Communications 




Matt Mulcahy, Steve Ulian, Jim Langway, Carlos Carla, Kevin Ferguson, 
Brian Casey 



Sports Arena Awaits 
Approval 

The administration is seeking 
the support of alumni, Newton 
residents and students for the 
proposed Lower Campus sports 
complex when the issue comes 
before the Boston Zoning Board of 
Appeals tomorrow. 

The meeting in (^ity Hall is the 



final legal obstacle before the 8,500 
seat arena can be built and offers 
local residents the chance to protest 
the construction. 

The University hosted a recep- 
tion, including a slide presentation, 
Wednesday to "inform friends, 
donors and neighbors as to the 
status of the prcyect." 

November 1«, I'.Wf) 




RITA A. TROUBALOS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 




LISA M. TRUINI 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 




MAY P. TSANC 

School of Kducalion 
B.A. Unman Dcvelopnunl 



GEORGIA TSOU GALAS 

School of Managemenl 
B.S. Marketing 



396 Friends 




DAWN A. TULLY 

Alls c^: Si ii-iucs 
B.A. Mathcmalics 



^»^^i 




TIMOTHY J. TULLY TIMOTHY M. TULLY, JR. PATRICIA TURCZYNSKI RUSSELL F. TURK 



Scliool (»( M.iiia^ciiRMil 
H.S. linaiitc 



.S( li(K)l ()i M-iiLigciiK'nl 

H.S. Clciicial Manaj^ciiifiil 

Kiiiaiuc 



.■\i Is cV SdciKcs 
l», A. ( i()iniiiiiiii( alioiis 



Alls & S( iciKc? 
H.S. I'.ioloKy 
I'liiliisophy 




DONALD J. TURNER 

School ot Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



LAURA A. TYLER 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 



SLOAN A. TYLER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 



GEORGE E. 
TZIMOPOULOS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 

Political Science 



ANNA TZOUFA 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




STEPHEN P. ULIAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



LAURETTE I. ULRICH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



WOOCHONG UM 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Computer Science 



KARA J. UNGER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 

Economics 



FRANK A. URSO 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Computer Science 




LAURA L. USIFER 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Mathematics 



BRADLEY H. VADAS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Economics 



KERRI L. VAFIADES 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 



SANDRA VAGELATOS THERESA M. VALE NT I 



School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Finance 



School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



Friends 397 




IPI 



CARL A. VALERI 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 



MARYS. VALLACE 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



JAMES B. VANANCLEN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

English 




GARY K. VANASSE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Biology 




PETER T. VANDERSLICE 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 

Marketing 




CHRISTIAAN D. 
VANDERVELDE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.S. Theology 




MARYKE E. VANDEVEN RICHARD J. VANHORN 

Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. Economics B.S. Computer Science 

Finance 



JUAN JOSE 
VAZaUEZ- CAPOTE 

Arts Sc Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



ISABEL M. VAZaUEZ 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 

Romance Languages 




RICHARD W. VAZZA 

School of Management 
B.S. Marketing 




x'X: ^-'tti -^^.i' V.' '\-i >x 




SALLIE A. VECE 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 




KRISTIE VELASCO 

.'\rts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Psychology 



PAUL T. VETRI 

.Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Computer Science 



i i 



LORENE VIE IRA 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




TRISH A. VINCI 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



SHERRI A. VITTI 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 




CYNTHIA L. VOLOSHIN JUDITH A. VON FELDT 
Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.A. Communications B.S. Accounting 



ADELAIDE VONLEH 

Evening C^ollegc 

B.S. Business Administration 



398 Friends 




THEOFANIS VOUTSARAS 

Alts K: Siiciiics 
B.S. Psychology 




CHERYL A. WADE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 













^ 


1 




Father Hanrahan 




r .^^^ 




Resigns, Effective in 




^^^ 


1 




June 




m^K^ 


.Jl^ 1 


Dean o 1 Si ti d c ii 1 s 




CI 


^^ 1 


lulwaid |. Hanrahan, .S) 
will resign ellective |urie 1 , 




T c -J 


Jf 




1986 ii was anntuiiiced 




■1 






I'riday. 

"ll (the news) is correct, 




•*'^%/^" 




effective June f ," Han- 
rahan saifl I'riday af- 




/ 


■ /»■' 




ternoon, "lurtlier com- 










nient will be available next 
week." 

"He (Hainahan) and 1 




^^1 


^^^^^H^ 




had been discussing it a 
year ago. This year, he will 




■ 


^H^^H 




have been 22 years in 
dorms, and 25 as a priest. 
He thought it would be a 


'y; 


""^^^1 


i^^^^^^^^^^^^^l 




good time to get a job with 


P 


^^^H 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 




regular hours," Vice 


P 


^^^H 


^l^^^^^^^^^^^^^l 




President for Student 


'■J 


^^^^H 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^1 




Affairs Kevin Duffy said 


O 
X 


^ 1^H 


^^^^^^^1 




Friday. 

November 18, 1985 










Peter Thomas, 


Fr. Hanrahan 






PAUL F. WAGNER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Computer Science 



ELIZABETH A. WAKIN 

School of Management 

B.S. Computer Science 

Marketing 



KELLIE A. WALKAMA 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



MAUREEN P. WALL 

Arts &: Sciences 

B.A. History 



THERESA M. WALLACE 

School of Education 

B.A. Severe 

Special Needs 




TRACEY A. WALLISCH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 




CAROLYN J. WALSH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



DONNA WALSH 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



ELIZABETH M. WALSH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JAIViES F. WALSH 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



Friends 399 



JOHN M. WALSH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JOHN M. WALSH 
Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Communications 
Political Science 



JOSEPH T. WALSH 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



MARGARET M. WALSH 

School of Nursing" 
B.S. Nursing 



MARY WALSH 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




MARY WALSH 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



MAURA A. WALSH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 




MAUREEN E. WALSH 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 

Finance 



STEVEN J. WALSH 
School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 




ERIC C. WALTER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 



BARBARA L. WALTHER 

Arts & .Sciences 

B..S. Biology 




Brian Fitzgerald, Mary Messer, Kim McClellan, Nancy English, Kathy 
Daley 



'Fleabag' Continue 
Tradition of B.C. Satire 

MY MOTHER'S FLEABAG — 
Co7nedy review at O'Connell House last 
Friday and Saturday. 

Students packed O'Connell 
House last Friday night to see 
B.C.'s own improvisational comedy 
group My Mother's Fleabag. When 
the lights went down and no one 
came on stage the crowd began to 
clap, begging the performance to 
begin. Fleabag's example of college 
showmanship complete with imagi- 
nation, wit, energy, and a hysterical 
review of the B.C. lifestyle. 

Fleabag used a mixture of 
rehearsed skits, improvised acts, 



songs, slides, and short films, to 
keep the audience constantly 
entertained. Humor was picked 
out of familiar B.C. scenes with 
satiric skill. 

This type of campus humor was 
fine tuned with a clever presenta- 
tion of B.C. news accompanied 
with slides. Two news announcers 
reported on such stories as the 
recreational lake in front of O'Neill 
Library, as well as killer books that 
attack unsuspecting students. The 
slides provided the visual kick that 
made these news briefs a comic 
success. 

November 25, 1985 



400 Friends 





JACaUELYN M. WALTON MAUREEN M. WARD TIFFANYE E. WARREN JOANN M. WASIK 



St liool ()i K<liualioii 
B.A. Eleni-Spctial Educalion 



Alls X: S( K'lKi-s 
B.A. tnglish 



Ai Is K: S( ifru cs 
B.A. ConiimiiiicalioM.s 



Alls &■ .Sciences 
B.A. Kiif,rlish 



GEORGE A. WATERS 

.Alls & S( iciiccs 

B.S. Biolofry 




MARY M. W ATKINS 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Philosophy 



SHERYLA. W ATKINS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 

Mathematics 



CAROLINE F. WATSON 

School of Education 
B.A. Human Development 



LAURIE A. WATSON 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Computer Science 



KATHLEEN WEAVER 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 
Communications 




ROBERT J. WEBER, JR. MICHAEL E. WEINCART ERIC P. WEINHEIMER 

School of Management Arts & Sciences School of Management 

B.S. Finance B.S. Political Science B.S. Economics 



Accounting 



Psychology 



LOUISE M. WEIS 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



CHRISTINE WELDON 

School of Education 

B.A. Elem-Special Ed. 




AN ASTASIA L. WELSH 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



FETTER E. WENDEL 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 



KAREN E. WENDELKEN 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



ELIZABETH M. 

WESELCOUCH 

School of Nursing 

B.S. Nursing 



SARAH WHEATON 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



Friends 401 



MISTY C. WHEELER 

Arts &-- Sciences 

B.A. Political Science 



JOHN F. WHELAN 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 



CARLAJ. WHITE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



S. JOSEPH WICKWIRE 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. History 



SUSAN L. WILDMAN 

School of Management 

B.S. Marketmg 




LISA W. WILKINS 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. English 



LINDSAY A. WILLETTE ANTHONY T. WILLIAMS EDWARD W. WILLIAMS KRISTEN M. WILLIAMS 
School of Management Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences School of Nursing 

B.A. Marketmg B.A. Communications B.A. Economics B.S. Nursing 




ELLEN A. WILSON 

School of Management 
B.S. Accounting 



JANET L WILSON 

School of Education 

B.A. Early Childhood-Special 

Ed. 



MARKC. WILSON 

School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 




^ikdik 




JAMES H. WINOKUR JEFFREY J. WINSOR EDWARD S. WISIALKO 

Arts & Sciences ArLs &c .Sciences School of Management 

B.A. Political Science B.A. Economics B.S. Marketing 



PAMELA D. WILSON 

Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



ROBERT C. WILSON 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 




THEODORE J. 
WITHERELL 

Arts &; Sciences 
B.A. Psychology 



COLLEEN M. WITT 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 



402 rriendi 




AN] A WITTEK 

Alls c<: Si iclln's 
B.A. English 



SCOTT R. 

WOLFELSPERCER 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 



CHRISTOPHER C. WOICIK 

Sihooj ol M^m.if^eiiiciil 

B.S. Compulei Science 

Accounling 




CHIU WONG 
Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 




Angela Binda, Jo Mary Kulevich, Kat Ride, Lori I-arnan, Maureen 
Hogan, Mary .Ann Gilbert 



B.C. Students March 
In Protect Of Apartheid 

Expressing their solidarity with 
the victims of South Africa's policy 
of apartheid, Boston College 
students gathered together 
Tuesday at the AHANA House 
and marched through campus to 
Robsham Theatre. 



Students wore black, arm bands 
as a symbol of sorrow, hope and 
unity. The Voices of Imani, a B.C. 
gospel group, began the march 
with freedom songs. Students 
walked abreast carrying candles 
and protest signs. 



NovembeE,25, 1985 




HUN S. WONG 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



LAURA WONG 

School ol Management 
B.S. Accounting 



MEE C. WONG 

School of Management 
B.S. Computer Science 



VICTORIA ML WONG 

School of Management 

B.S. .Accounting 

Computer Science 



MICHAEL P. WOOD 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. History 




PETER M. WOODBURY 

.School of Management 

B.S. Accounting 

Computer Science 



WILLIAM A. WORTH EN SUSAN M. WORTMANN 

.-\rts & Sciences School of Management 



B.A. Economics 



B.S. Finance 



BARRY S. WYMAN 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 



KRISTIN J. YANKEE 

.Arts &: Sciences 
B.A. English 



Friends 403 



AMYM. YARBROUCH 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Psychology 

Theater Arts 



JULIAN C. YATES 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. English 



CAROLYN S. YEE 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Communications 



MARIA T. YOUNG 

Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Mathematics 



CHANCPAE J. YU 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 




MICHAEL H. 
ZAFIROPOULOS 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Political Science 



JOSEPH A. ZAREMBA 

School of Management 

B.S. Finance 



ANTHONY J. ZARILLO 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Economics 



JO ANN M. ZAWTOCKI 

School ot Education 

B.A. Mathematics 



LISA P. ZEIDMAN 

School of Nursing 
B.S. Nursing 




ANDREW J. ZELTER 

School ol Management 
B.S. Finance 



BEATRICE ZEPPA 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. Romance Languages 



LINDA S. ZERANSKI 

School of Management 
B.S. Finance 




d^d.-^ 



CHRISTOPHER J. ZISI 

Arts & Sciences 
B.A. English 



NEAL W. ZOROMSKI 

Arts & Sciences 

B.S. Biology 




ELIZABETH A. ZOUZALIK GREGORY J. ZUERCHER JEANNE M. ZURLO 

School of Education Arts & Sciences Arts & Sciences 

B.A. Elementary Education B.S. Biology B.S. Political Science 



A very special thanks to Jim Van Anglen, 
the 1985 Editor of Heights, Inc., for 
allowing Sub Turri to reprint articles 
from the past four years and for giving 
us permission to use the official Height's 
logo. Sub Turri would also like to thank 
the University Archives for their help in 
the research and copying of the articles. 



H 



404 Friends 





EDITOR'S NOTE: 

The photos and the articles for each 
page were selected at random. They 
were not necessarily meant to compliment 
one another although in some cases they 
did. A very special thanks to all members 
of the senior class who submitted candid 
photos. The idea was intended to give 
seniors the opportunity to make some of 
their own memories part of the 
yearbook. We only regret that we were 
not able to use them all. The choices were 
made by the editors based on the quality 
of the photos and how well they fit into 
the theme of friendship that the section 
set out to capture. 

RMB '86 



Friends 405 




E. Paul Robsham Jr. 
1963-1983 

"May God he kind to a noble boy 
Who is somebody's son and pride and joy" 



406 Memonum 



v-^ 



\ 



Meredith Mary Shine 
1964-1984 



For it^s the laughter 

We will remember 

Whenever we rem^em^ber 

The way we were 



c^y 



^-^^^ 



J. 






Memorium 407 



BENEFACTORS 



As Sub Turri is an organization independent from the University, we 
receive neither University funds nor a portion of the activity fee to defray 
production costs. Therefore, the staff of Sub Turri would like to extend its 
gratitude to parents, friends, faculty members, and alumnae who 
generously contributed to the 1986 edition of Sub Turri. 



GOLD 

Cy Bonoff 

John R. Riley 8c Family 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Peter J. Barry 

Mr. 8c Mrs. E. Peter Bouchard 

Mr. 8c Mrs. J. Thomas Bruno, Jr. 

Senate President William M. Bulger 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert R. Callan 

Dr. 8c Mrs. John L. Callinan 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Pedro Caride 

Mr. 8c Mrs. George L. Carney, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Matthew Casamassima 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas J. Cashman 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John M. Cataldo 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Alfred Cavuoti 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Juan R. Colon-Pagan 

Mr. Joseph E. Corcoran 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Josh D'Avanzo 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Fred M. Dellorfano, Jr. 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Salvatore A. DeLuca 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John L. Dentzer, Sr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Peter Brown Dolan 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Manfred Ernesti 

Richard Feadder, Ft. Lee, NJ 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Arnold D. Fiascone 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Richard B. Fitzpatrick 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Nicholas Gaizizitano 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Roberto B. Gonzalez-Molina 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas P. Harkins 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Edward J. Harkins 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John Adam Hillenbrand H 

W. Drew Hoffman 

Enrique Irizarry, Jr. 

Henry 8c Lillian Kakol 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John Kinsella 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Charles E. Knudsen, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Otto Kossuth 



408 Patrons 



Richard Sc Barbara Kulle 

Angelo John Lorusso M.D. 

Mn & Mrs. l.R. McDougall 

Anne Sc Duke McMahon 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Mulcahy III 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Edward F. Murphy, Jr. 

John 8c Kathleen O'Reilly 

Bernard 8c Mary Odoy 

In Memory of Cynthia Paskowski 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Martin J. Rocanelli 

Barbara F. Sanchez 

John 8c Catherine Shea 

William Sitar 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Gerald J. Smith 

Mr. 8c Mrs. David Watson Smith 

Barbara 8c Bill Sullivan 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Quinlan J. Sullivan, Jr. 

Parents of Stephen Trezza 

Prince 8c Princess of Wales 

Judge 8c Mrs. Raymond D. Williamson 

Charles G. Woran 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Frank Zabaya 

SILVER 

Al 8c Pat Brackley 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Carlos J. Clinton 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Vincent J. Conforti, Sr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Dante DeDominicis 

Mr. 8c Mrs. James Duffy 

Brian J. Farrell, Esq. Law '66 

Mr. 8c Mrs. William A. Fusco 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Salvatore Gengaro 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Donald Giampietro 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Carlos J. Ginely, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas J. Lavin, Jr. 

Gerard 8c Mary McCourt 

Patrick G. 8c Patricia A. McKeever 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Carlos J. Pou 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Antonio V. Romaldez 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert D. Ryan, Sr. 

Max J. Steinmann 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas J. Ward 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Frederick J. Wortmann 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Arthur R. Zelter 



Patrons 409 



PATRONS 

Mr. & Mrs. William Aherne 

Ben 8c Vivian Akillian 

Mr. & Mrs. R.J. Albright 

Dr. & Mrs. Jose Almeida 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Alonso 

Aramis & Myriam Alvarez 

Mr. 8c Mrs. James R. Alvord 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Joseph P. Amaral 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Francis X. Amsler 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Anderson, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Anesds 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Arkwright 

Sedat M. Ayata, MD 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Lawrence J. Badar 

Robert & Diane Baker 

Mr. 8c Mrs. James B. Barron 

Steven J. Barron, Jr. 

G. Paulina 8c Stanley J. Batog 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Rene C. Beauchemin 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Manfred E. Becker 

Mr. & Mrs. George D. Behrakis 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas Beilinski 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Peter C. Belval 

Dr. & Mrs. Patrick C. Bennison 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Norman R. Beretta 

Anthony J. Bertolino, Esq. 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Biancardi 

Carol A. Blake 

Mrs. Antoinette Bocxe 

Mr. & Mrs. Andrew R. Bombara 

Dr. 8c Mrs. George W. Bordner 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Walter Borman 

Arthur & Doris Bosa 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Louis C. Bosco, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Asimakis Botsolis 

Mr. 8c Mrs. F.C.C. Boyd 

Hon. 8c Mrs. Peter F. Brady 

Family of Joseph A. Bremner 

Charles W. Bresnahan 

Harry L. Bricker, Jr. Esq. 

Josephine Bromley 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Paul L. Broughton 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas B. Brown 

Mr. & Mrs. C.P. Bruen 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert D. Bruzek 

Mr. & Mrs. A. Lawrence Buckley 

Mr. 8c Mrs. William Buckley 

Mary Jane Buddy 

Marial Bulmer 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Brian P. Burns 

Frances Burrell-Cusack 

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Butterworth 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Patrick Callagan 

Mary 8c Paul Callan 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Harry Cardillo 

Carol 8c John Cardinal 

Dante & Jean Cardinali 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond E. Carey 

Frances M. & David F. Carney 

Herbert E. Carroll 

Pete & Barbara Carrozza 



Mr. & Mrs. J.F. Caruso 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John A. Casey 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Joseph F. Castaldi 

The Caulfield Family 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Francis. X. Cavanagh 

Mr. & Mrs. Ting G. Chin 

Ki Man Choe 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael P. Chrismer 

Dr. 8c Mrs. James E. Clark 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Frank Colangelo 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Richard M. Colley 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert T. Collins 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Matthew T. Colon 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert E. Conklin 

Mr. 8c Mrs. T.J. Connaughten 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John J. Conroy, Jr. 

Frank 8c Mary Lou Coppola 

Dr. 8c Mrs. John J. Corcoran 

Joseph 8c Gloria Costa 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Frank L. Couch, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Francis Crane 

Marjorie Cummings 

Mr. & Mrs. William L. Cunis 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Frank Cutrone 

Dr. 8c Mrs. John Cywinski 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Victor W. D'Amato 

Mr. & Mrs. Arthur D'Amico 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Bernard D'Avella 

Mr. 8c Mrs. A. Curis Daniell 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Pasquale J. Danna 

Adelia, Daniel, Julia 8c John DaSilva 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas DeAgazio 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Vincent A. DeConti 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Paul F. Degnan 

Mr. 8c Mrs. William J. Delayo 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Frank A. DeLuca 

Dr. 8c Mrs. C. DeMarco 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Peter Demogenes 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Carlos Deschapelles 

Mr. &: Mrs. David F. DesRoches 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Mark E. Devane 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Charles W. Dinn 

Antonio F. Dizon, MD 

Edward H. 8c Lois M. Doerr 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert K. Doherty 

Robert P. Doherty 

Dr. 8c Mrs. D.T. Donley 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas E. Donnelly 

Brendan 8c Patricia Donovan 

Mr. &: Mrs. Francis E. Dooley, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel A. Doran 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Edward H. Dowling 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Jack H. Doyle 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Roger L. Duerksen 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert Duffy 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul C. Duncan 

Roberto Dun Barreiro 

Mr. 8c Mrs. James J. Dunseith 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Edward H. Dwyer 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Michael Early & Family 

Mr. 8c Mrs. T.M. Edson 

John F. Eidmann 



410 Patrons 



Ml, & Mrs. Thomas P. Kldt r 

Klias & (k)nstantiria Inc. 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph F. Klsriian 

Mrs. Mary I . Knglish 

Mr. &: Mrs. Joseph Ettore 

Mr. & Mrs. James L. Fagan 

Mr. & Mrs. Dominie J. Fallon 

Mr. &: Mrs. Stephen A. Fanning, Jr. 

Phillip W. Farmer 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard P. Farnau 

Neal & Barbara Farrell 

Mr. &: Mrs. Marcel R. Faucher 

Tom & Marie Fergus 

Clare A. Finnegan 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Daniel Fitzgerald 

James Sc Ann Fitzgerald 

The Joseph J. Fitzpatrick Jr. Family 

Ellen Finley Flach 

Edward B. Flaherty 

Mr. Sc Mrs. L. Foppiani 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael P. Forrestall, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John Frasco 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Frigerio 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Gerard G. Frost 

Mr. & Mrs. Gregory F. Fulgione, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas L. Gaffney 

John 8c Terry Gaffney 

Anthony 8c Judy Gaito 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John J. Gallagher 

George E. Gallagher, Jr. 

J nana M. Garcia 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Timothy A. Garry 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John F. Gavin 

Raymond H. Gennerman 

Dr. 8c Mrs. JM. Gerend 

Mary S. Gervais 

Louis Giannuzzi 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert G. Gibbons 

Mrs. Barbara A. Gindhart 

Charles N. Gitto, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Edward J. Glackin, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. William F. Glavin 

Kenneth 8c Kaye Gnazzo 

Betty &: Joe Goldberg 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Severino G. Gomilla 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard L. Graff 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph P. Grant 

Paul 8c Terri Gray 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Richard Grizzetti 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Bernard Grothaus 

Dr. 8c Mrs. F. A. Habra 

Mr. 8c Mrs, Alfred L. Haffner, Jr. 

Thomas J. 8c Frances C. Hall 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Francis M. Hannon 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Hanrahan Jr. 

Charles & Pricilla Hart 

Parents of Jane F. Harte 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles A. Hastings, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert M. Haughey 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Fredrick D. Hayes 

Lee & Mary Hebert 

R. Hemstreet, Jr. 



Mt. 8c Mrs. George Hennessy 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Dietrick Hernandez 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Lynn Hess 

Don 8c Eileen Hill 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Hing (i. Hom 

Mr. 8c Mrs. H. Francis H(julihan 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John F. Howlctl 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter D. Howley 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Richard F. Hughes 

Don 8c Mary Beth Hughes 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert N. Hutchison 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Victor G. lanno 

Mr. 8c Mrs. James C. Israel 

Mary Elizabeth Jaeger 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Charles Janda 

Mr. & Mrs. Bernard G. Johnson, Jr. 

James 8c Frances Johnstone 

Dr. 8c Mrs. John J. Jordan 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Philip M. Judge 

Dr. 8c Mrs. James R. Kanski 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Paul Kanzler 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Karpick 

John J. Kavanagh 

William 8c Martha Kea 

The Keane Family 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Keaney 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas M. Keaney 

Carolyn Wall Keegan 

Fran 8c Paul Kelleher 

Mr. 8c Mrs. James R. Kelly 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Kelly 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert P. Kelly 

William 8c Pauline Kelly 

Mr. & Mrs. Brian Kennedy 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John Keohane 

Mrs. Elise M. Kerr 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Donald C. Kiaer 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles J. Kickham, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Edwin Kiley 

Paul & Kathy Kinderman 

John 8c Patricia King 

Bob 8c Pauline Kirchner 

Mr. & Mrs. Rudolph J. Klein 

John 8c Christine Kline 

Mr. 8c Mrs. William Korchak 

John 8c Rosmary Kowalski 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Kulas 

Jerry 8c Eileen LaForgia 

Francis E. Lake, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert V. Lallo 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John J. Landers 

Craig & Madeline Larson 

Mr. 8c Mrs. K.A. LaTeef 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Jerome C. Lawless 

Alix Lawlor 

Jack 8c Anne Leahy 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Lee 

Mr. & Mrs. Rhoady R. Lee Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert A. Leingang 

Mrs. Richard J. Leonard 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Robert V. Libertini 

Thomas E. & Rita S. Lilly 



Patrons 411 



Mr. & Mrs. R.J. Lippert 

Mr. & Mrs. Enrique Llanso 

Mrs. Veronica LoConte 

Dr. & Mrs. Robert E. I ubanski 

Mr. & Mrs. James R. Luke 

Joseph D. Lynch 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard B. Lynch 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert Thomas Lynch, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. William R. MacDougall 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter M. Macek 

Mr. & Mrs. John C. Mackeen 

Dr. & Mrs. Charles C. Mackey, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. B. MacTaggart 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Bernard Madeira 

Daniel Mahedy, Jr. 

The Oliver Mahoney Family 

The Maldonado Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Maloney 

Doug Sc Betsy Manchester 

Mr. & Mrs. James J. Manfiald, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Mannix 

Edward & Dorothy Martel 

Myrna Martinel 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Martucci 

Mr. & Mrs. Carl A. Massaro, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. John T. Massman 

Dr. & Mrs. Peter Masso 

Peter F. Mattimoe, MD & Christina 

William B. Mattinnore 

Nyal & Mary McA'Nulty 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas B. McCabe, Jr. 

Dr. & Mrs. Raymond McCaffrey 

LCT & Mrs. William D. McCarthy 

Mr. & Mrs. William L. McCarthy 

Dan & Virginia McCarthy 

Mrs. Ellen McCullough Drake 

Dr. & Mrs. Peter L. McDermott 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard E. McDonald 

Richard & Teresa McDonnell 

Dr. & Mrs. M.T. McDonough 

Mr. & Mrs. William G. McGagh 

Dr. & Mrs. Joseph J. McGee, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Vincent McGeehan 

Dr. & Mrs. Edward McGinley 

Mr. & Mrs. James L McGrath 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. McHale 

Mr. & Mrs. George L. McLaughlin 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. McLaughlin 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter J. McLaughlin 

Mr. & Mrs. David McMahon 

Dr. & Mrs. George B. McManama 

Mr. & Mrs. John B. McNamara 

Bernard & Janet McQuade 

The McWeeney Family 

Donald L. Meccia 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond R. Mendel 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald G. Mercurio 

Mr. & Mrs. Luigi Messia 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Messier 



Frank & Ann Marie Messina 

Annie Metellus 

Dr. & Mrs. Francis J. Meyer 

Mr. & Mrs. Donald J. Meyers 

Mr. & Mrs. Allen Mihalik 

Emily & George Mihelic 

Mr. & Mrs. Susuma Miiyashiro 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry G. Miller 

Chae H. Min 

Bill & Diane Ming 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph F. Mitchell 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas Moody 

Mr. & Mrs. William P. Mooney 

Mr. & Mrs. James J. Moran 

Friend of Chris Morano 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter Mordarski 

Mr. & Mrs. John A. Moreschi 

Dr. & Mrs. Vincent J. Moriarty 

Joseph & Edwina Moscaritolo 

Mr. 8c Mrs. William P. Mott 

Robert & Sarah Mottershead 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Elia A. Mottola 

Gerald R. Mouton 

Fred & Alice Mullane 

Charles F. Murphy 

Mr. 8c Mrs. William J. Murphy 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert W. Murphy 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Harry L. Murray 

Mr. 8c Mrs. William A. Murray, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Kenneth E. Nairne 

The John Nemsick Family 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Stanley Newsham 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Paul F. Noble 

Mr. &: Mrs. Stanley J. Norbert 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas E. Nunan 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas F. O'Connell 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John J. O'Connor III 

Dr. & Mrs. Paul O'Donovan 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Walter D. O'Hearn, Jr. 

Gus & Edith O'Keefe 

Mr. 8c Mrs. J.T. O'Reilly 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Gaudincio Obial 

Raymaond D. Omerza's 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John A. Palmieri 

Mr. 8c Mrs. George J. Pamtos 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Ronald A. Pardus 

Mrs. Josephine Parrella 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Pascale 

Kathleen 8c Donald Peck 

Joan M. Pembroke 

Efren Perez Suarez 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Anthony Perillo 

Mr. & Mrs. Rocco Perrotta 

Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Phillips 

Mr. & Mrs. Howard Phillips 

Eleanor M. Piers 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Ronald Pike 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Joseph A. Popolizio 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John E. Powers 



L 



412 Patrons 



Mr. &: Mrs. Leonard Friiu ipc- 

|()-Aii I'rosdoi imi Kairwcatlicr 

Mr. & Mrs. Jo.seph |. I'uslikal 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Rath 

Mi. & Mrs. K. laii Ravenscroft 

Irene Raza 

John J. 8c Carol M. Rearden 

Mr. & Mrs. James P. Redgate 

Mr. Sc Mrs. Clarence J. Reed 

Mr. & Mrs. Gregory Rice 

Mr. & Mrs. Terrence J. Richcardson 

Mrs. Thomas F. Rinehart 

Mr. & Mrs. Jose A. Rionda 

Mr. & Mrs. Gary Roache 

Dr. & Mrs. Mario J. Robles 

Mrs. Helen Rocco 

John & Irene Rogers 

The Rogers Family 

Mr. & Mrs. John R. Romanek 

Mr. & Mrs. Alberto Romero 

Mrs. Lawrence Francis Rooney, Jr. 

Jack 8c Alana Rosshirt 

Leo P. Rukstalia, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Russell 

Mr. & Mrs. Patrick Russell 

Margaret 8c Arthur Ryan 

Dr. & Mrs. Walter M. Ryan, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Joseph A. Sabga 

Dr. 8c Mrs. Andres R. Sabio 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Albert G. Sablone 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis A. Saccoccio 

Mrs. Rita D. Salamone 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Roger Salmonson 

John 8c Aileen Sanders 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Manuel D. Santos 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Scardaville 

Amy E. Schall 

Fred Schauder 

Mr. &: Mrs. Richard Schuessler 

Mr. 8c Mrs. George P. Scobie 

Dr. & Mrs. Joseph Sferrazza 

Sharon 8c Alvin Shanus 

Mr. &: Mrs. Conrad P. Sheehan 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Paul F. Sheehan 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert R. Sheehan 

Mrs. Albert V. Shelby, Sr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Gerald Sheldon 

Dr. & Mrs. David R. Sheppard 8c Family 

Mr. & Mrs. William Shilale 

Ellen Short 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Arthur T. Silk 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas Silvis 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Alfred Skoczenski 

Maurice 8c Nancy Slayton 

Mr. & Mrs. James A. Smida 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Wm. C. Smiy 

Mr. &: Mrs. J. Spellman 

Mr. &: Mrs. Francis Sprano 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Harry E. Squasoni 



B 



Mr. 8c Mrs. Ernst Stalzer 

Mr. 8c Mrs. David A. Sieinbririk 

Dr. 8c Mrs. William Stephan 

George E. Straub 

Ted & |uiu- Slrojny 

Adrian 8c Irene Strysky 

Robert & Elaine Sullivan 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Richard J. Sullivan 

Karen Sullivan 

Mr. & Mrs. James J. Sullivan Jr. 

Tony 8c Sharon Suppelsa 

Mr. 8c Mrs. David L. Sweet 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Sylvia 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Donald J. Szostar 

Mr. 8c Mrs. William S. Szymanski, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. James L. Taft, Jr. 

Ken & Mary Ellen Taggart 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Vincent J. Tague 

Frank 8c Barbara Tanlai 

Dr. & Mrs. Philip J. Tardanico 

Tom & Judy Taylor 

Barbara B. Thomas 

Robert & Sarah Thompson 

Mr. & Mrs. Stephen R. Tilton 

Lecil 8c Betty Townsend 

Johe 8c Therese Treacy 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Paul Trotta 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Alexander Troubalos 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John F. Trueman 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Joseph Truini 

Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin F. Tully, Jr. 

Stanley Turk 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas A. Turley 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel J. Turner 

John & Judy Tyler 

Angelo L. Urso 

Mr. & Mrs. Basil Vafiades 

Adrian Van Zon 

Lynne 8c Bill Wagner 

Mr. & Mrs. Martin F. Wall 

Gene & Mary Ann Wallace 

L.A. Wallisch,Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Bailey G. Walsh 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John E. Walsh 

Mr. & Mrs. John M. Walsh 

Mr. 8c Mrs. James J. Ward 

The Family of Robert J. Weber 

Mr. 8c Mrs. A. Webster 

Mr. & Mrs. Linos E. Weingart 

Tom 8c Terry Weis 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Wendelken, Jr. 

Mr. 8c Mrs. J. Wayne Wheeler 

Marilyn M. 8c Gerald O. Wilson 

The Thomas Woodka Family 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Richard Yankee 

Jane Young-Loft 

Ervan 8c Jeanette 8c Liz Zouzalik 

Rose 8c Vic Zurlo 



Patrons 413 



r 



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The Honors Program 

of 
The College of Arts and Sciences 

extends its heartiest 
Congratulations and Godspeed 

to the 
Class of 1986 



414 Ads 




liostoii (lollc-gc Aliiini Association 

Alumni Hall 

74 (/Ommon wealth Avenue 

Chestnut Hill, MA 02 Hi? 

617-552-4700 



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Events, Reunions, Address Updates, Coordinating Class 

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Education and more. 

The Alumni Association is your link to the University. 




THE BOSTON COLLEGE 

ALUMNI 

ASSOCIATION 

WELCOMES THE CLASS OF 

1986 
TO THE ALUMNI FAMILY 



Congratulations 

and Best Wishes to 

the Class of 1986 




Deans and Faculty 

of the School of 

Nursing 




Boston College 
Computer Store 



Congratulations to the 
Class of 1986 

God Bless You 



Ach 415 







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boston college !s independent student weekly 



WISHES 

GRADUATING SENIORS 

THE BEST 

OF LUCK! 



If vou would like to continue 
receiving The Heights in the 

future, send a subscription 
request to McElroy 113. 



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Compliments of 

the Bellarmine Law 

Academy 



To the members of 

the Student Program 

in Admissions 

"Thanks for all 
your help" 

From the entire 

Admissions staff 

and the Class of 

1990! 




Compliments 
of the 

BOSTON COLLEGE 

ATHLETIC 

ASSOCIATION 



Ads 417 



Congratulations to the Class of 1986 

From 

Justin C. Cronin 

Lori Egan 

JohnJ. Neuhauser 

Virginia O'Malley 

Nancy Samya 

The School of Management 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 

To The Class of 1986 

From 

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Official School Photographers 

Miller Falls, MA 



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Congratulations to the 
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Congratulations to the Class of 1986 
From 

J. JOSEPH BURNS, ASSOCIATE DEAN 
PATRICIA DE LEEUW, ASSISTANT DEAN 
CAROL HURD GREEN, ASSOCIATE DEAN 

MARIE MC HUGH, ASSOCIATE DEAN 
WILLIAM B. NEENAN, S.J., DEAN 

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Ads 419 



CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 

TO THE CLASS OF 1986 

FROM 

THE BOSTON COLLEGE BOOKSTORE 




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420 Ads 



Best Wishes to the 

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the Memoiies 

Reverend Edward 
J. Hanrahan, S.J. 

"If we are the beneficiaries of today's Christian 

heritage, are we not the seed for tomorrow's beauty 

and splendor. " 




The Deans and Faculty 

of the 

School of Education 



Salute the 
Class of 1986 



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Office of Student 

Programs and Resources 

Congratulations Class of 1986 

• The Resource Center 
For All BC Clubs 

• Located in McElroy 141 
Across from the Bookstore 







Compliments 
of 

Hunter Publishing 

Company 

P.O. Box 5867 

Winston-Salem, North 

Carolina 27113 



Ads 423 




A&S Coalition of Caucauses 

— 44 
Aaccomando, Lynette A. — 

278 
Abraiianison, Robert M. — 

278 
Accounting Academy — 68 
Acosta, Rene A. — 278 
Adelman, Fr. Fred — 217 
Alfonso, Paul F. — 278 
Agoglia, Michael J. — 278 
Agostino, Laura M. — 278 
Aguda, Melidy — 278 
Agugliaro, Barney J. — 278 
Akillian, Gail M. — 278 
Alaimo, Christopher E. — 278 
Albrecht, Kristy — 278 
Alcott, Donna M. — 278 
Aldrey, Pedrode — 278 
Alfano, Susan M. — 278 
Aljian, John M. — 278 
Allen, Peter — 278 
Alonso, Robert J. — 278 
Alpha Epsilon — 38 
Alpha Kappa Delta — 38 
Alpha Sigma Nu — 38 
Alvarez, Julie A. — 278 
Alvarez, Pablo — 278 
Alvord, Mary M. — 279 
Amaral, Maryan — 279 
Ambrose, Elaine L. — 279 
Amendola, Lisa A. — 279 
Amnesty International — 74 
Amsler, Ann T. — 279 
Anderholm, Teri — 279 
Anderson, Leslie E. — 279 
Anderson, John R. — 279 
Anderson, William — 280 
Andrade, Jose R. — 279 
Andreaggi, Lisa J. — 280 
Andrews, Jayne — 280 
Andrysiak, Jean C. — 280 
Anestis, Dianne M. — 280 
Angelus, Theodore L. — 280 
Annese, Steven R. — 280 
Anthony, Robert J. — 280 
Antunes, Antonio M. — 280 
Appleby, Julie A. — 280 
Araujo, Steven R. — 280 
Arellano, Christine M. — 281 
Armenian Club — 44 
Armian, Haleh — 281 



Armstrong, Raymond F. — 

281 
Arnold,JeffreyS. — 281 
Arrieta, Georgina A. — 281 
Arts and Sciences — 186, 259, 

260, 264 
Asam, Elizabeth A. — 281 
Asian Student Club — 44 
Assefi, Soraya J. — 281 
Astarita, Kennth — 281 
Audet, Craig M. — 281 
Aviles, Gilbert — 281 
Ayotte, Barbara L. — 281 
Azzalina, Sandra M. — 281 
Azzoio,Jeffrey O. — 281 




Badar, Jeanmarie — 281 
Bagget, Janine M. — 281 
Bagget, Robert — 281 
Bailey, Cynthia — 281 
Bailey, David L — 281 
Baker, Jean H. — 281 
Baker, Richard W. — 282 
Balf, Cynthia A. — 282 
Balog, Sheila A. — 282 
Balon, Bruce J. — 282 
Band — 54, 55 
Banoun, Gary L. — 282 
Bapst Library — 272 
Baptist, Donald J. — 282 
Barbrow, Susan L. — 282 
Barrett, Margaret M. — 282 
Barrett, Stephen J. — 282 
Barrett, Thomas A. — 282 
Barron, Michael F. — 282 
Barron, Steven J. — 282 
Bartelme, Peter J. — 282 
Basketball, Men's — 116-123 
Basketball, Women's — 127 
Bates, David F. — 282 
Batog, Deborah E. — 282 
Battaile, William G. — 282 
Bauseo, Christine — 282 
Baxter, Christopher L. — 282 
Bazarian, Charlene S. — 282 
Bazikas, Vitas A. — 282 
Bean pot — 147 



Beaulieu, Allison R. — 283 
Beaven, Maureen — 283 
Beck, Richard M. — 283 
Becker, Margaret E. — 283 
Behrakis, Drake G. — 283 
Belbal, Peter G. — 283 
Bell, Kennethy S. — 283 
Bell, Mary R. — 283 
Bellamy, Mary R. — 283 
Bellarmine Law Academy — 

67 
Belliveau, Paulette L. — 283 
Beltramini, David P. — 283 
Benjamin, MarkJ. — 283 
Bennett, Regina M. — 283 
Bennett, Marcia L. — 283 
Bennison, Patrick C. — 284 
Benoit, Richard P. — 284 
Berardo, Nancyjean A. — 284 
Berg, Patricia J. — 284 
Bergin, Susan C. — 284 
Bergstrom, Richard — 284 
Bergwall, Thomas P. — 284 
Berkenkamp, Lauri L. — 285 
Berry, Pamela J. — 285 
Bers, Lea C. — 284 
Bertron, Dennis C. — 285 
Beta Gamma Sigma — 39 
Bethoney, Judith A. — 285 
Biancardi, Salvatore L. — 285 
Bicknell, Jack — 79, 87 
Bicknell, Wendy S. — 285 
Biemer, Cynthia A. — 285 
Big East — 88, 98, 126 
Bilodeau, James E., Jr. — 285 
Binamira, Joel A. — 285 
Binda, Angela F. — 285 
Binney, Michael W. — 285 
Biology Association — 68 
Bishop, William D. — 285 
Biszantz, Jo Ann — 285 
Bitzan,John F. — 285 
Black, Kari R. — 285 
Black Student Forum — 45 
Blake, Kathleen A. — 285 
Blake, Vivienne A. — 285 
Blaz, Roberta M. — 285 
Bleck, Daniel S. — 285 
Bletzer, Kim M. — 285 
Bliss, Kevin E. — 286 
Blomquist, John D. — 286 
Blood, Mary Jean — 286 
Bloom, Sara A. — 286 
Blouin, Kathleen A. — 286 
Blue, James D. — 286 
Bobadilla, Teresa — 286 
Bobelis, Ruta K. — 286 
Bocx, Hendricus F. — 286 
Bogan, Karen M. — 286 
Bokhour, David P. — 286 
Boksanski, Patricia A. — 286 
Boldry, Carolyn M. — 286 
Bolger, Stephen J. — 286 
Bonadies, Lisa A. — 286 
Boni, Jonathan S. — 286 
Boo, Kathleen S. — 286 



Bookstore — 201 
Booth, Ann M. — 286 
Bordner, Barbara J. — 286 
Borg, Mary Beth — 286 
Borman, Linda L. — 287 
Boroff, Robert S. — 287 
Borsodi, Kelly D. — 287 
Borsos, Deborah J. — 287 
Bosa, John W. — 287 
Bostick, David R. — 288 
Boston — 20-34, 230 
Boswell, John S. — 288 
Botsolis, Christopher — 288 
Bottomley, Louise C. — 288 
Bouchard, Elizabeth A. — 288 
Bouchard, Timothy H. — 288 
Boudreau, Wilfrid P. — 288 
Bouley, Linda M. — 288 
Bourke, Karen A. — 288 
Bouvier, Danniel J. — 288 
Bowen, Douglas M. — 288 
Bowes, Cheryl A. — 289 
Bowker, Mary C. — 289 
Boyarsky, Bruce T. — 289 
Boyce, Timothy — 289 
Boyle, Helen N. — 289 
Bracciotti, Peter M. — 289 
Bradley, Robert E. — 289 
Brady, Colleen Ann — 289 
Brady, Peter F. — 289 
Brady, Rosemary — 289 
Braga, Jill A. — 289 
Bralla, Mary C. — 289 
Bransfield, Marie E. — 289 
Brehm, Felicia C. — 289 
Bremis, Irene — 289 
Brennan, David J. — 289 
Brennan, Elizabeth M. — 289 
Brennan, Gregory C. — 289 
Brennan, Katherine E. — 289 
Brennan, Michael J. — 289 
Breton, Myriam — 290 
Brewster, Ben — 102 
Brezinski, Donna J. — 290 
Bricker, David L. — 290 
Brill.Jennifer M. — 290 
Broderick, Cecil B. — 290 
Bromley, James L. — 290 
Broughton, Karen M. — 290 
Brown, Douglas A. — 176, 

177, 290 
Brown, Ellen — 290 
Brown, Erin M. — 290 
Brown, James — 290 
Bruen, Kevin P. — 290 
Bruey, Elizabeth E. — 290 
Bruni, Danielle J. — 290 
Brunnick, Theresa M. — 290 
Bruno, Corri A. — 290 
Bruton, Francis X. — 290 
Bucceri, MarkJ. — 290 
Bucci, Christine M. — 290 
Bucciarelli, Aimee — 290 
Buck. Robert P. — 291 
Buckingham, Steven H. — 

291 



424 Index 



lUicklc-y, Joliii K. — 291 
Biuklcy, Jiidilli M. — 291 
liuckk-y, Kciry — 291 
Buckley, Michael P. — 291 
Buckley, luuolhy D. — 291 
Buckley, I'aul S. — 291 
Buddy, Mara — 291 
Buui, Johu — 291 
Buuuell, Richard T. — 291 
Burgess, Peggy A. — 292 
Burke, Fdiiuuid C. — 292 
Burke, jauel M. — 292 
Burke, Karen A. — 292 
Burke, Kathleen — 292 
Burke, Mary L. — 292 
Burrell, Kristen — 292 
Buses— 198, 199 
Butler, Mary E. — 292 
Byrne, Christine M. — 293 
Byrne, Gail P. — 293 




Cabelin, Michael A. — 293 
Cabot, Daniel D. — 293 
Cabral, Sally A. — 293 
Cabral, Charles N. — 293 
Caceres, Bernado — 293 
Cademator, Steven A. — 293 
Caggiano, Christopher — 293 
Cahill, John D. — 293 
Cahill, Kenneth — 293 
Cahill, Margaret — 293 
Cairoli, Eve M. — 293 
Cala, Carlos — 293 
Caliendo, Amy J. — 293 
Callaghan, Marie A. — 293 
Callaghan, Patricia A. — 293 
Callinan, Julie M. — 293 
Calzada, Maria E. — 293 
Cammarota, Anthony P. — 

293 
Campanelli, Ronna M. — 294 
Campbell, Kerry C. — 294 
Campus Crusade — 60 
Campus Liturgy — 60 
Campus Masses — 217 
Campus School — 264 
Cannon, Mark J. — 294 



lannoM, Clare M. — 294 
la|)(>//i, NaiK y (i. — 294 
iardcll, Ann E. — 294 
lardellio, Kristin M. — 294 
latdiiial, ( ilii i.sl()|)her — 294 
Cardinal, Kalhlecti M. — 294 
Carew, Williani James — 294 
Carey, Mi< had S. — 294 
Carey, I'loicme A. — 294 
Carey, Richard J. — 294 
Caride, Peter — 294 
Carney, Marua J. — 294 
Carney, Kevin M. — 294 
Carpenter, Mona A. — 294 
(^arpi, Anthony — 294 
Carr, Eileen M. — 294 
Carr, Susan T. — 294 
Carroll, Eddie — 1 10 
Carroll, Judith A. — 295 
Carter, Phillip J. — 295 
Carvajal, Margarita — 295 
Carvalho, Kimberly A. — 295 
Casavant, Marcel J. — 295 
Case, WendyJ. — 295 
Casey, Brian B. — 295 
Casey, Diane F. — 295 
Casey, Diane P. — 295 
Casey, Pamela J. — 295 
Casey, Patricia A. — 295 
Cass, Mary R. — 295 
Castellon, Carlos A. — 295 
Castellone, Mary S. — 295 
Catalano, Ben J. — 296 
Cataldo, John M. — 298 
Caterina, John G. — 296 
Cattley, Deborah A. — 296 
Caulfield, Joseph T. — 296 
Cavanagh, Sean J. — 296 
Cavanaugh, Diana R. — 296 
Cavanaugh, Lisa A. — 296 
Cavuoti, Anthony R. — 297 
Cayer, Denise M. — 297 
Cedrone, Lydia T. — 297 
Centeio, Maria J. C. — 297 
Chahmirzadi, Nadereh — 297 
Chamorro, Maria A. — 297 
Chappell, Marial A. — 297 
Charismatic Prayer Group — 

59 
Charles River — 221 
Cheerleaders — 52 
Cherubino, Judy — 297 
Chess Club — 45 
Chestnut Hill — 88, 272 
Chestnut Hill Mall — 218 
Chiampa, Gregory — 298 
Chiang, Lingling V. — 297 
Chiarlone, Angelo Aroldo — 

297 
Chicago Bears — 222 
Children's Theater — 51 
Chin, Melissa — 297 
Chin, Susie Y. — 297 
Ching, Betty P. — 297 
Chiriboga, Pablo — 297 
Chong, Chiu Hak A. — 297 



;h()iig, Myong A. — 297 
ilioralc University — 56, 210 
:hrisi, William A. — 297 
lliristman, Lymi Ami — 297 
:inist<), John S. — 297 
ihunias, Ste|jhen G. — 297 
Ciampa, Rita K. — 298 
liaslko, Christine A. — 298 
iicchelli, l.auia — 298 
Cichewicz, Robert W. — 298 
alea, Anthony J. — 298 
ancai i, Mary (;. — 298 
Cinema Society — 48 
Cirino, Deborah E. — 298 
Cistulli, Joseph R. — 298 
Clancy, Pamela A. — 298 
Clarey, Lisa A. — 298 
Clark, Cynthia E. — 298 
Clark, David D. — 298 
Cleveland Circle — 195, 198, 

218, 238 
Clifford, Amory S. — 298 
Clifford, Linda — 298 
Clifford, Peter — 298 
Clifford, James D. — 298 
Clinton, Lizabeth — 298 
Cloos, Paul A. — 298 
Clouser, Karen L. — 298 
Glower, Elizabeth M. — 299 
Coakley, Timothy J. — 299 
Cobety, DavidJ. — 299 
Cogliano, John — 299 
Cohane, William J. — 299 
Cohen, Pierre V. — 299 
Cohen, Wendy A. — 299 
Cohler, Mary — 299 
Cokonis, Mary E. — 299 
Colangelo, Robert J. — 299 
Coldren, Carol A. — 299 
Coleman, Maureen A. — 300 
College Sub Shop— 191 
Collier, Richard P. — 300 
Collins, Bernadine M. — 300 
Collins, Donna M. — 300 
Collins, Lynne M. — 300 
Collins, Maurice J. — 300 
Collins, MichaelJ. — 300 
Collins, Peter J. — 300 
Collins, Stephen J. — 300 
Colon, Francisco J. — 300 
Colpak, Brian D. — 300 
Comer, Joan T. — 300 
Computer Science Academy 

— 67 
Computers — 271 
Condry, Pamela M. — 300 
Confort, Nicholas M. — 300 
Conklin, Robert W. — 301 
Conley, Timothy J. — 301 
Conlon, Eileen M. — 301 
Connaughton, Maureen — 

301 
Connon, Mark D. — 301 
Connor, Daniel P. — 301 
Connor, Thomas M. — 301 
Connors, Daniel S., Ill — 301 



Connors, Donald P. — 301 
CoiHiors, Terence P. — 301 
Oiniiors, Nancy M. — 301 
( Minroy, John — 301 
(>()iisolini, Diiia M. — 164, 

165, 301 
Consolini, Domia M. — 164, 

165, 301 
Conlraia, Maura — 301 
Conway, John D. — 301 
Conway, Raye Ann • — 301 
(Jon/a, Michael A. — 301 
Cook, Patricia M. — 301 
Coppola, Allison M. — 302 
(Corcoran, Christine M. — 302 
Corcoran, Michael — 302 
Corcovan, William P. — 302 
Cordio, Maria — 302 
Core Courses — 268, 269 
Cornelius, Bruce — 302 
Corrigan, Catherine D. — 302 
Costa, Joseph W. — 302 
Costas, Joanne A. — 302 
Costello, John M. — 302 
Cotell, Richard W. — 302 
Cotter, Thomas E. — 302 
Cotton Bown — 79 
Couch, Lynda M. — 302 
Coughlin, Clare — 302 
Couto, Alexander A. — 302 
Cowan, Kelly A. — 302 
Cox, Daniel W. — 302 
Cox, Linda R. — 302 
Coyle, Joseph E. — 302 
Crean, Joanne M. — 302 
Cresci, Charles G. — 303 
Crew Club — 60 
Croke, Debra — 303 
Cronin, Anne M. — 303 
Cronin, Diane M. — 303 
Cronin, Kathleen J. — 303 
Cross and Crown — 40 
Cross-Country Men's — 98, 

99 
Cross-Country Women's — 

96,97 
Croteau, Deborah L. — 303 
Crotty, Carole M. — 303 
Crowell, Colin E. — 303 
Crowley, Robert C. — 303 
Cruz, Carl J. — 303 
Cshiriboga, Carlos — 304 
Cullen, John S. — 304 
Cullen, Sharon A. — 304 
Cummings, Leslie E. — 304 
Cunis, David W. — 304 
Cunnane, Deirdre A. — 304 
Cunningham, Colleen M. — 

304 
Cunningham, David L. — 304 
Curran, John A. — 304 
Curtin, Thomas A. — 304 
Cusack, Marguerite M. — 304 
Cusack, MichaelJ. — 304 
Cusanelli, Elizabeth C. — 305 
Czertak, Steven M. — 305 



Index 425 




D'Alessandro, Lisa B. — 305 
D'Allessandro, Douglas M. — 

305 
D'Amato, Ellen — 305 
P'Amato, Susan — 305 
D'Ambrosio, Elaine M. — 305 
D'Amico, Domenic — 305 
D'Amico, John A. — 305 
D'Ariano, Gerard D. — 3D5 
D'Avanzo, Louis — 306 
D'Avella, Denise M. — 306 
Davey, Jennifer L. — 305 
Dacey, Mark P. — 305 
Dacey, William M. — 305 
Dailey, Geth Ann — 305 
Daley, Kathleen M. — 305 
Daly, Debra A. — 305 
Daly, Joan M. — 305 
Daly, Kathleen — 305 
Dance Ensemble — 53, 244, 

245 
Daniels, Julie Anne — 305 
Danna, Maryann — 305 
Dario, Perto — 306 
Darling, Joseph D. — 306 
Daronco, Maria M. — 306 
Daunt, Ann M. — 306 
Davey, James S. — 306 
David, Steven — 306 
Davis, Marilyn J. — 306 
Davis, Timothy C. — 306 
Davis, Jeanne M. — 306 
Davis, Michael C. — 306 
Dawson, Patricia E. — 306 
Day, Jane A. — 306 
Deagazio, Rosella C. — 306 
Deangelo, George T. — 306 
Deblasio, Maria A. — 306 
Deconti, Brenda M. — 306 
Dedominicis, Luisa A. — 306 
Dedominicis, Nunzia — 306 
Degiulio, Lisa A. — 307 
Degnan, Thomas — 307 
Deguzman, Brian J. — 307 
Delagenest, Valerie E. — 307 
Delaney, Christine — 307 
Delano, Carolyn M. — 307 
Deleo, John D. — 307 
Dell, Laura F. — 307 
Delouchrey, Sharon A. — 307 
Deluca, Joan Marie — 307 
Deluca, Michael E. — 307 
Demarco. Adriene — 308 
Demarco, Nicholas P. — 308 



Demaso, Jeffrey A. — 308 
Dempsey, Gregory J. — 308 
Denham, Lilibeth K. — 308 
Dennis, Thomas W. — 308 
Derrickson, Paul F. — 308 
Deschapelles, Carlos O. — 308 
Deshields, Spencer L. — 308 
Desouza, David A. — 308 
Desroches, David J. — 308 
Deuchler, Carol L. — 308 
Devane, Glen E. — 308 
Deverna, Richard D. — 308 
Dianrdo, Judith A. — 309 
Dibella, Barbara M. — 309 
Dibernardo, Rosita C. — 309 
Dibiaggio, Deirdre — 309 
Dibiase, Lisa P. — 309 
Dibona, Diane — 309 
Dicapua, Frank M. — 309 
Dichiara, Barbara F. — 309 
Dieffenbach, Eric J. — 309 
Digiuseppe, John L. — 309 
Digiustini, Juliana A. — 309 
Dillihunt, Joan E. — 309 
Dillon, Martha — 309 
Dilorenzo, Frank T. — 309 
Dineen, Mary A. — 253 
Dining Services — 193 
Dinn, Kathleen A. — 309 
Dinnigan, Leah M. — 309 
Dion, Jacqueline M. — 309 
Dischino, Daniel J. — 309 
Dischino, Dennis — 309 
Discoll, PaulT. — 313 
Dizon, Anthony A. — 309 
Dmohowski, Kathy — 310 
Dobens, Charles T. — 310 
Dobro Slavo — 39 
Docktor, Andrew G. — 310 
Doerr, Nancy L. — 310 
Doherty, Daniel P. — 310 
Doherty, Maura Jean — 310 
Donahue, Anne M. — 210 
Donahue, Jane — 310 
Donegan, Michael P. — 310 
Donley, Donald — 310 
Donnegan, Christopher B. — 

310 
Donnelly, Brian F. — 310 
Donnelly, John M.,Jr. — 310 
Donnelly, Kathleen M. — 310 
Donnelly, Thomas H. — 310 
Donoghue, Chris M. — 310 
Donovan, Tara M. — 310 
Donovan, Timothy P. — 310 
Doolan, Kathryn M. — 310 
Dooley, Stephanie M. — 310 
Doran, Ann Christine — 311 
Dormitories — 189 
Dorsey, Patricia M. — 311 
Douchette, Paul — 193 
Dougherty, Allison A. — 311 
Dougherty, Elizabeth A. — 

311 
Dougherty, James J. — 311 
Dougherty, Maribeth — 311 



Doulton, Bettina — 311 
Dow, Mark V. — 311 
Dowd, Deirdre Marie — 312 
Dowling, Barbara S. — 312 
Downey, Kevin 1. — 312 
Downey, Matthew J. — 312 
Downing, Peter J. — 312 
Doyle, Ellen G. — 312 
Doyle, Tara M. — 312 
Draeger, Rebecca M. — 312 
Drain, Joan D. — 312 
Drama Society — 53, 213 
Driggs, Woodruff A. — 180, 

181, 312 
Driscoll, David M. — 312 
Driscoll, Joseph S. — 312 
Drolet, Renee A. — 313 
Drummond, Theodore G., Jr. 

— 313 
Dubois, MichaelJ. — 313 
Dudley, Dorothy P. — 313 
Dudley, James G. — 313 
Duffy, Carolyn F. — 313 
Duffy, Kevin — 256 
Duffy, Sandra A. — 313 
Duffy, Eileen M. — 313 
Duncan, Anne — 313 
Dunn, Roberto A. — 313 
Dunne, Patrick J. — 313 
Dunseith, Janeen M. — 313 
Dupere, Nelson A. — 313 
Duran, Robert — 313 
Durbin, Jeffrey D. — 313 
Durburg, Jennifer A. — 313 
Durkin, John — 201 
Dus, Lisa M. — 313 
Dustin, Deborah A. — 313 
Dwyer, Amy E. — 314 
Dwyer, Suzanne — 314 




Early, Eileen — 314 
Eastus, Victoria M. — 314 
Economics Association — 68 
Eddy, Carol J. — 314 
Edson, Stephanie A. — 314 
Edwards, Dennis M. — 314 
Edwards, John H. — 314 
Egleston, Colleen M. — 314 
Eidmann, John F. — 314 
Elder, John K. — 314 
Elsman, James M. — 314 
Emello, Catherine R. — 314 



Emens, Theresa E. — 314 
Emery, Robert D. — 314 
Engel, Richard C. — 314 
Engels, Cathleen M. — 314 
Engler, Brien A. — 314 
English, Nancy M. — 314 
Environmental Action Center 

— 64 
Epsilon Delta — 38 
Erb, Kurt K. — 314 
Erbin, Joan — 315 
Ernest, Monica A. — 315 
Ernst, Marie — 315 
Essex, Jean M. — 315 
Ettore, Joseph R. — 315 
Evangelidis, Louis K. — 315 
Evans, Linda M. — 315 
Evans, Susan M. — 315 
Exercise — 240, 241 




Faber, Susan — 315 

Fahey, Fr. Joseph, SJ. — 187, 

254 
Falcone, John J. — 315 
Fall Fest — 242, 243 
Falla, lleana — 316 
Fallon, Ann V. — 316 
Fallon, Jeanne M. — 316 
Fallon, Joseph M. — 316 
Fallon, MartinJ. — 316 
Falotico, Anthony L. — 316 
Falvey, Mark A. — 316 
Fanelli, Daria E. — 316 
Faneuil Hall— 186, 238 
Fanning, Robert J. — 316 
Farina, Melissa A. — 316 
Farmer, Christy L. — 316 
Farnan, Lori A. — 317 
Farone, Mary Jo T. — 317 
Farrar, Michelle C. — 317 
Farrell, Lisa J. — 317 
Farrell, William G. — 317 
Faucher, Dennis — 317 
Feeney, Donald G. — 317 
Feeney, Robert F. — 317 
Feitelberg, Jane E. — 317 
Feitelberg, John J. — 317 
Felker, Christopher D. — 317 
Fergus, Catherine M. — 317 
Ferguson, Kevin P. — 317 
Ferrante, Maria A. — 317 
Ferrara, Lisa A. — 317 



426 Index 



Fcrrara, Ruliard A. — :517 
Fiascone, James A. — 317 
Fiold Hockey— 108, 109 
Fikis, jolm G. — 317 
Film Board — (iO 
Fina, Ro.salI)a A. — 317 
Finance Academy — 69 
Fine, Stephanie C). — 317 
Fine Arts Union — 44 
F"inigan, Maura D. — 318 
Finnegan, Robert M. — 318 
Firicano, Lisa C. — 318 
Fitzgerld, Brian J. — 318 
Fitzgerald, Jenniler — 318 
Fitzgerald, Kerry A. — 318 
Fitzgerald, Margaret E. — 318 
Fitzgerald, Patricia — 318 
Fitzgibbon, Nancy K. — 318 
Fitzpatrick, Kelly J. — 318 
Fitzpatrick, Theresa M. — 318 
Flach, Rosemary D. — 318 
Flaherty, Diane — 318 
Flaherty, John J. — 318 
Flanagan, Joseph E. — 318 
Flanagan, Karen A. — 318 
Flanagan, Wendy W. — 318 
Flatley, Stephen R. — 318 
Flett, Elizabeth J. — 318 
Flock, Rebecca A. — 318 
Flores, Mark D. — 319 
Florio, Luanne M. — 319 
Flutie, Doug — 79 
Flynn, Ellen — 319 
Flynn, Lorraine — 319 
Flynn, Mary L. — 319 
Fogarty, James E. — 319 
Foley, Eileen — 319 
Foley, Michael B. — 319 
Follette, Dana M. — 319 
Fong, Elaine — 319 
Fontanella, Mary — 319 
Fonts, Regina V. — 319 
Football — 78-87 
Foote, Kelly — 319 
Fopiano, Robin A. — 319 
Foppian, Rose Ann — 320 
Ford, Kenneth M. — 320 
Forrestall, Michelle P. — 320 
Forsythe, Nicholas B. — 320 
Foster, Lisa H. — 320 
Foster, Peter — 320 
Fovvley, Eileen P. — 320 
Fox, Jerry P. — 320 
Fox, Stephen J. — 321 
Foz, Maria L. — 321 
Fran^ais, LeCercle — 47 
Francis, Kelly A. — 321 
Freeman, Bethany A. — 321 
Freeman, Leslie M. — 321 
Freeman, Shelila J. — 321 
Freese, Deborah E. — 321 
Freiberger, Robert G. — 321 
Freitas, Miriam A. — 321 
French, Thomas C. — 321 
Freshmen Assistants — 186, 
187 



ries, Paul E. — 321 
rosco, DoiHia — 32 1 
r()S(<), Donna E. — 321 
ucarilc, Julie E. — 321 
uchs.John S. — 321 
uchicr, |()anna L. — 321 
uiginili, Mary E. — 321 
uigione, Lynne-Ellen — 321 
ull{ iton, Pamela A. — 321 
ulioii Society — 70 
uria, Kristen L. — 321 
uriong, Thomas P. — 322 
usco, Barl)ara L — 322 
usco, Marisa C. — 322 
uture F"emale Execs — 7() 




Gaffney, Anthony C. — 322 
Gaffney, Eleanor M. — 322 
Gaffney, Theordore J. — 322 
Gage, John H. — 322 
Gagliardi, Mark V. — 322 
Gagne, Andrea J. — 322 
Gagnon, Maria — 322 
Galang, Roy D. — 322 
Galgay, JohnJ. — 322 
Gallagher, James P. — 322 
Gallagher, Joseph G. — 322 
Gallagher, Susan M. — 322 
Gallatin, Andrea J. — 322 
Galvin, Joann M. — 322 
Gambarini, Arturo F. — 322 
Garcia, Francisco J. — 323 
Garcia, Cecile M. — 322 
Garcia-Chacon, Fernando — 

322 
Gargas, Anthony S. — 323 
Garippo, Lisa M. — 323 
Garner, Thomas P. — 323 
Garofalo, Michael J. — 323 
Garry, Patrick J. — 323 
Garvin, Ethel B. — 323 
Gaspard, Lisa R. — 323 
Gates, Joanne M. — 323 
Gatti,John C., Jr. — 323 
Gaughan, Maureen C. — 323 
Gee, Sherry A. — 323 
Geis, Geoffrey — 324 
Gengaro, Christopher — 324 
Genirs, Timothy R. — 324 
Gentile, Daniel J. — 324 
Gentile, David — 324 
Georgeu, Richard J. — 324 



(ieraghty, Patrick C. — 324 
Gerbasi, Joseph S. — 324 
ierman Academy — 47 
;ervaiN, Paul 1). — 324 
Gcsmundo, Kristen A. — 324 
Ihura, Uneal S. — 325 
iiaui|Melro, Donald J. — 325 
Giannuzzi, Susan !•'. — 325 
iiacjuinlo Joseph — 325 
;iar<liell(),' Michael G. — 325 
libbons, Eileen A. — 325 
Gilbert, MaryAnn T. — 325 
iiil, Janice — 325 
;ill, Suzanne A. — 325 
lillespie, Anne G. — 325 
lillette, Anne M. — 325 
iilson, Thomas F. — 325 
Ginley, John J. — 325 
Giovannucci, Laurie A. — 325 
Girard, Deborah A. — 325 
Giuffrida, Caroline J. — 325 
Glackin, Amy E. — 325 
Glavin, Cecily M. — 325 
Glebus, Kristin A. — 325 
Glora, Mary K. — 325 
Glowik, William V. — 326 
Gnazzo, Kerstin R. — 326 
Go, Phyllis Monique H. — 

326 
Goddard, Stacia M. — 326 
Godfrey, Thomas — 326 
Godvin, Regina — 326 
Goganian, David H. — 326 
Goggin, Linda M. — 326 
Gold Key Society — 65 
Goldman, Jill A. — 326 
Golf, Men's— 110, 111 
Goncalves, Maria F. — 326 
Gonser, George W. — 326 
Gonthier, Denyse — 326 
Bonzabez-Molina, Robert L. 

— 326 
Good. Irene R. — 326 
Goodman, Laura J. — 326 
Gordon, Michael J. — 326 
Gordon, Scott M. — 326 
Gorga, Charlene L. — 326 
Gosesorkhi, Maani — 326 
Goss, Craig — 326 
Gottlieb, Elaine A. — 327 
Gowetski, Mark — 327 
Grace, Julie E. — 327 
Grace, Thomas M. — 327 
Graeb, Sharon E. — 327 
Graff, MaryBeth — 327 
Gramaglia, Nina L — 327 
Grammas, Maria — 327 
Grande, Mary A. — 327 
Grant, Marie L. — 327 
Grant, Michael S. — 327 
Gray, Debra T. — 327 
Greene, John E., Jr. — 327 
Greenfield, David T. — 327 
Greenlaw, Sandra L. — 328 
Gregoire, Kathy A. — 328 
Grew, Carolyn J. — 328 



(ireycliff — 49 
Grie.sdorn, Monica M. — 328 
(Jriflln, Linda M. — 328 
(irilfin, Paula — 328 
Griffin, William N. — 328 
(iriffith, William F. — 328 
(iroden, lorn — 135, 137 
Grothaus.JulieJ. — 328 
(;rozier,John l". — 328 
(iuarnier, Fimothy J. — 329 
Gudailis, Nancy J. — 329 
Guerlin, Patrick M. — 329 
(iuido, Jeanine M. — 329 
(iuinla, Joe — 107 
Gulino, Glenn A. — 329 
Gunning, Timfjthy M. — 329 
Guy, Tracy A. — 329 




Hafey, Margaret E. — 329 
Hage, Sarah M. — 329 
Haggerty, Christine — 329 
Hajjar, James N. — 329 
Haley House — 49 
Hall, Maris J. — 329 
Hallisey, Amy E. — 329 
Halloran, Shawn M. — 329 
Hamilton, Patricia C. — 329 
Hammond, Lisa F. — 329 
Han, Mary Y. — 329 
Hanaway, Dawn E. — 329 
Hanh, Chau — 329 
Hanlon, Jennifer M. — 330 
Hannigan, Patrick A. — 330 
Hannon, Michael T. — 330 
Hanrahan, Anna M. — 330 
Hanrahan, Fr. Edward J. S.J. 

— 217, 257 
Hanrahan, Shelia M. — 330 
Hanson, Michelle — 330 
Harkins, Maria K. — 330 
Harlow, Scott C. — 330 
Harney, Joseph M. — 330 
Harrington, Paul — 330 
Harrison, Michelle — 330 
Hart, Kelly A. — 330 
Hart, Paul C. — 330 
Harte, Jane E. — 330 
Harvard Square — 218 
Hasbun, Eric A. — 330 
Hassey, Catherine A. — 330 
Hastings, Elaine M. — 330 
Hastings, Susan M. — 330 

Index 427 



Haughey, Karen E. — 330 
Hauser, Wendy A. — 330 
Hawkins, Allyson R. — 331 
Haxton, Jacklyn A. — 331 
Hayes, Michael P. — 331 
Haynes, Katherine A. — 331 
Healey, Alicia E. — 331 
Heaslip, Christopher K. — 

331 
Hebert, Suzanne P. — 331 
Heck, Alyssa M. — 331 
Heelan, Peter R. — 331 
Hegarty, James W. — 331 
Heggie, Gerald A. — 331 
Heights — 230 
Heisman Trophy — 79 
Helfrich, William P. — 331 
Hellenic Society — 46 
Helow, Diane M. — 331 
Hemmer, Andrew — 331 
Hemstreet, Raymond M. — 

332 
Henderson, Susan E. — 332 
Hennessy, Beth A. — 332 
Herina, Jo-Anne — 332 
Hernandez, Christina M. — 

332 
Hernandez, Lorieta E. — 332 
Hernandez, Samantha A. — 

332 
Hesenius, Janet R. — 332 
Hess,Jodi A. — 333 
Hesse, Karyn A. — 333 
Hewitt, SueAnn — 333 
Hickey, Barbara R. — 333 
Hill, Rosemary — 333 
Hill, Patricia M. — 333 
Hillenbrand, Holly M. — 333 
Hippeli, Christina M. — 333 
Ho, Frankie C.T. — 333 
Ho, Michael C.H. — 333 
Hoban, Patrick J. — 333 
Hockey, Men's — 138-144 
Hockey, Women's — 61, 146, 

147 
Hoffman, Beth A. — 333 
Hoffman, Steven J. — 333 
Hogan, Maureen B. — 333 
Holden, LisaJ. — 333 
Hoidner, Gretchen A. — 333 
Holland, Ken — 333 
Hone, Thomas E. — 333 
Honors Program — 259 
Hooton, Michael L. — 333 
Hopper, Adrianne — 333 
Horan, Nancy E. — 334 
Horrigan, Sharon M. — 334 
Horwitz, Robin S. — 334 
Hosbein, Gregory — 334 
Houle, Kevin J. — 334 
Houlihan, Darragh M. — 334 
Howlett, Carolyn A. — 334 
Hoye, Patrick J. — 334 
Hsu, Joan Y.A. — 334 
Hudzik, Michael J. — 334 
Huether, John S. — 334 



Hughes, Ernia P. — 334 
Hughes, Richard Mark — 334 
Hulse, Lori L. — 334 
Humanities Series — 225 
Hunt, Amanda — 334 
Huntress, Steven G. — 334 
Huppe, Susan M. — 334 
Hurley, Margaret — 334 
Hurricane Gloria — 205 
Hussey, Robert G. — 334 
Hutchison, Barry — 334 




laccarino, Michael L. — 335 
lanzito, Anne-Marie — 335 
Igoe, Kathleen T. — 335 
Incandela, Denise — 335 
Intramurals— 112, 113, 114, 

115 
Investment Club — 71 
Irish Society — 46 
Irvine, Gregory — 335 
Irwin, Nancy S. — 335 
Isacco, Maria B. — 335 




Jabbour, Joanne — 335 
Jackowitz, Todd — 335 
Jaeb,Jill A. — 335 
Jaillet, Heidi — 335 
Janda, Richard C. — 335 
Jaramillo, Francisco J. — 336 
Jarrell, Marcie — 336 
Jazz Ensemble — 56 
Jeanneret, Andrew J. — 336 
Jear, Sidney — 336 



Jennings, Philip W. — 336 
Jensen, Lance C. — 336 
Joakim, Karen — 336 
Johnson, Dawn M. — 336 
Johnson, Linda E. — 336 
Johnson, Raymond M. — 336 
Johnston, Suzanne — 336 
Johnstone, Lori A. — 336 
Jones, Richard A. — 336 
Jordan, Lisa M. — 336 
Jordan, Michael J. — 337 
Joseph, Lisa P. — 337 
Joy, Richard J. — 337 
Joyce, Anne T. — 337 
Judge, Mary G. — 337 
Judge, Teresa — 337 
Judicial Board — 66 
Julian, Ann M. — 337 
Juliano, Kathleen L. — 337 
Jumes, James G. — 337 
Jung, Paul — 337 
Junus, Yasmin — 337 




Kakol, Jayne E. — 337 
Kale, Carol A. — 337 
Kale, ElizabethJ. — 337 
Kane, Carole A. — 172, 173, 

337 
Kane, Kelley A. — 337 
Kaplan, Stacey M. — 337 
Karamitsios, Nicholas — 337 
Karate Club — 61 
Kasparian, Charles V. — 337 
Kasperovich, Susan M. — 337 
Kaster, Chris M. — 338 
Kates, Kimberley A. — 338 
Katis, Susiemae — 338 
Kaupp, David L. — 338 
Kaynor, Frederick K. — 338 
Kea, William D. — 338 
Keane, Robert E., Jr. — 338 
Keaney, Kelly A. — 338 
Keaney, Michael J. — 338 
Keating, Michael J. — 338 
Kehoe, Elizabeth A. — 338 
Kehoe, Kathleen — 338 
Keith, Lynne A. — 338 
Kelfer, Lori S. — 338 
Kelleher, Eileen G. — 338 
Kelley, Edward J. — 338 
Kelley, Eileen M. — 338 
Kelley, Sean J. — 339 



Kelley, Deborah A. — 338 
Kelley, Heather M. — 338 
Kelley, Lisa A. — 338 
Kelley, Madeline C. — 339 
Kelley, Sheila — 339 
Kelly, Carol M. — 339 
Kelly, Shaun P. — 339 
Kelly, Thomas P. — 339 
Kelly, Ursula A. — 340 
Kelly, Wendy Barnes — 340 
Kelly, Joseph P. — 339 
Kelly, Patrice M. — 339 
Kelly, Shelagh — 339 
Kelly, Shelia — 339 
Kelterer, Kathryn Jeanne — 

340 
Kemmerer, Allison N. — 340 
Kemper, Joanne E. — 340 
Kendrick, Jill M. — 340 
Kennedy, Christopher G. — 

340 
Kennedy, Clare M. — 340 
Kennedy, Joan T. — 340 
Kennedy, Kathleen — 340 
Kenney, John J. — 340 
Kenney, Maura A. — 340 
Kenney, Robert J. — 340 
Kenny, Kevin Eugene — 341 
Kenny, James B. — 340 
Kerr, J. Andrew — 341 
Kerr, Jacqueline A. — 341 
Kerslake, Scott W. — 341 
Kiaer, Kathleen M. — 341 
Kickham, Charles — 341 
Kiley, Edwin F. — 341 
Kiley, Lisa A. — 341 
Kimball, Kristie L. — 341 
Kinderman, Laurie A. — 341 
King, Edward L.R., Jr. — 341 
Kinsella, Jeanette E. — 341 
Kirchner, John M. — 341 
Klein, Ann M. — 341 
Khne, Betsy A. — 341 
Klug, Terri L. — 341 
Klumpp, Linda S. — 341 
Knudsen, Cynthia Ann — 341 
Kohler, Elizabeth L. — 341 
Konchalski, Susan M. — 341 
Korchak, Richard S. — 342 
Kosciuszek, Joseph A. — 342 
Kossuth, Kelly A. — 342 
Kotsopulos, Sofia — 342 
Kowalski, Lisa Ann M. — 342 
Kozlowski, Karen E. — 342 
Kranick, Christopher G. — 

342 
Kreshik Andrew P. — 342 
Kulas, John P. — 342 
Kulbis, Tasas A. — 342 
Kulevich, Jo-Mary — 342 
Kulevich, Jo-Mary — 342 
Kulle, Christine M. — 342 
Kupersmith, Kenneth L. — 

342 
Kuras, Kelley M. — 342 
Kuryla, Alison A. — 342 



428 Index 



Kwasniowski, Lisa M. — 342 




Labbe, David P. — 342 
Labelle, Paul D. — 342 
Labrecque, Robin L. — 342 
Laconca, Lisa M. — 342 
Lacruz, Marco Antonio R. — 

343 
Ladd, Alexia A. — 343 
LaFleur, Denise M. — 343 
Laforgia, Margaret — 343 
Lafreniere, Lisette M. — 343 
Lagerson, Shirley A. — 343 
Lagerstrom, Kristi A. — 343 
Lahive, James — 343 
Lai, Shirley — 343 
Laliberte, John C. — 343 
Lallo, Robert M. — 343 
Lambert, James M. — 344 
Lamparelli, Kara E. — 344 
Landers, John — 344 
Lane, Edward M. — 344 
Lane, Mary L. — 344 
Lane, MaryRose — 344 
Langille, David B. — 344 
Langway, James F. — 344 
Lanouette, Laurie A. — 345 
Laplace, Jeannine — 345 
Larkin, Thomas M. — 345 
Lauble, Stephen M. — 345 
Laurie, Ellen C. — 345 
Lawless, Christine L. — 345 
Lawless, Patricia A. — 345 
Lawson, Stephen J. — 345 
Ldambert Trophy — 79 
Leary, Jean M. — 345 
Lee, Barbara T. — 345 
Lee, David K.Y. — 345 
Lee, John Michael — 345 
Lee, Lily — 345 
Lee, Martha M. — 345 
Lee, MaryEllen — 345 
Lee, Michael J. — 345 
Lee, Pui Ching — 345 
Lee, William L. — 345 
Leighton, Robert H., Jr. — 

345 
Lemieux, Jean E. — 345 
Leonard, Alison — 346 
Leonard, Kathleen — 346 
Limon, Jodie Ann — 346 
Linehan, Ann-Marie — 347 



Lines— 190 

Linnehan, [olin [. — 317 
Lippcit. Juliana — 347 
Liiiatio, Digiiora — 347 
Lister, Lauri-iuc W., )r. — 

347 
Listen, Deboiah A. — 347 
Lilurgy Arts (irou|) — 60 
Livecchi, Karen A. — 347 
Lianso, Carlos E. — 347 
Lo (ionte, Jean M. — 347 
Logan, Deborah — 347 
Long, Caroline R. — 347 
Long, Katherine H. — 347 
Long, Melissa J. — 347 
Lopez, Elvis — 347 
Lorusso, Mark D. — 348 
Loscocco, James — 348 
Lowney, Dawn L — 348 
Lubanski, Christine S. — 348 
Luber, Steven T. — 348 
Luke, Mary Grace — 348 
Lure, Loretta A. — 348 
Luttazi, Tracy A. — 348 
Luzzi, Michele R. — 348 
Lynch, Albert Thomas — 348 
Lynch, Christopher J. — 348 
Lynch, Colleen M. — 349 
Lynch, Edward C. — 349 
Lynch, Karen L. — 349 
Lynch, Laura A. — 349 
Lynch, Mary B. — 349 
Lynch, Robert P. — 349 
Lynch, Thomas F. — 349 
Lyon, Ann M. — 349 
Lyon, Christopher M. — 349 
Lyon, Harry D. — 349 
Lyons, Kevin J. — 349 
Lyons, Margaret M. — 349 




Macaione, David M. — 349 
Macchi, Edward J. — 349 
Macconi, Richard A. — 349 
MacDonald, Jack — 98, 130 
MacDougal, Laurie A. — 349 
Macek, Elizabeth A. — 349 
MacFarlane, Maureen A. — 

349 
MacGuire, MaryBeth — 350 
Maclsaac, Darlene F. — 349 
MacKeen, John Michael — 

349 
Mackey, Charles C. — 350 



MacLc-aii, Kathleen — 350 
MacPherson, Patiicla K. 

350 
Madaus, Marllia M. — 350 
Madden, Claire A. — 350 
Madden, Claire M. — 350 
Madeira, Sally Ann — 350 
Madonna — 245 
Mahl, Christopher C. — 350 
Mahler, John A. — 350 
Mahoney, Arnie R. — 350 
Mahoney, Mary T. — 350 
Mahoney, Shelia M. — 350 
Mahoney, Tracy E. — 350 
Mahoney, Thomas E. — 350 
Mailroom — 232 
Maitland, Christopher S. — 

350 
Maldonado, Andrew — 350 
Mallon, Laurie }. — 350 
Malloy, Sheila B. — 350 
Malone, Diane M. — 351 
Malone, Patricia A. — 351 
Maloney, David C. — 351 
Man, Leslie A. — 351 
Mancini, Karen — 351 
Manee, Sandra — 351 
Manfredonia, Gina M. — 351 
Mangan, MaryBeth — 351 
Mangraviti, Mary F. — 351 
Mannarino, Michelle K. — 

351 
Manning, Jefferey W. — 35 1 
Manning, Michelle G. — 351 
Manning, Paul S. — 352 
Manning, Peter J. — 352 
Mara, Maureen E. — 352 
Marandino, Robert P. — 352 
Marcelynas, John — 352 
March, John B. — 352 
Marek, Scott Allen — 352 
Marin, Lisa — 352 
Marketing Academy — 71 
Marma, Marijean — 352 
Marra, Sheila M. — 352 
Marrone, Mark G. — 352 
Marrs, Nancy — 352 
Marsan, William P. — 352 
Marsh, Kevin M. — 352 
Marshall, Rachel M. — 353 
Martin, Catherine L. — 353 
Mardn, Karen T. — 353 
Martin, Michele C. — 353 
Martin, Thomas J. — 353 
Martinez, Robert M. — 353 
Martins, Karen — 353 
Martwick, Cathleen R. — 353 
Mary-Ann's — 206 
Masek, Donna M. — 353 
Masi, Michelle — 353 
Massaro, Christopher A. — 

353 
Massey, Melissa A. — 353 
Massey, Michael P. — 353 
Masso, Peter — 353 
MASSPIRG — 63 



Mastriano, Louis — 353 
Malachana, Manuel — 353 
Maili Society — 72 
Mai hews, Martin H. — 353 
Maiinho, Paul J. — 353 
Matthews, Nancy L. — 353 
Maung, Melanie C. — 353 
Mavandad, Farhad — 354 
McAlary, Alison — 354 
McAleer,John J. — 3.54 
McAilisler, Susan R. — 354 
M( Aneriy, Anne (;. — 354 
McAiuilty, Brian N. — 354 
McCabe, Katherine M. — 354 
McCabe, Patricia J — 354 
McCaf ferty, Karen A. — 354 
McCallion, Michele — 354 
McCann, Karen — 354 
McCarthy, Anne H. — 354 
McCarthy, Edward J. — 354 
McCarthy, Hugh F. — 354 
McCarthy, Kathleen — 354 
McCarthy, Linda M. — 354 
McCarthy, Patricia W. — 354 
McCarthy, Susan — 354 
McCarthy, Maureen M. — 

354 
McCauley, Christine — 354 
McCauley, Michael P. — 355 
McClellan, Lauri S. — 355 
McConnell, Margaret A. — 

355 
McCormack, Francis J. — 355 
McCormick, Jennifer A. — 

355 
McCormick, Paul J. — 355 
McCourt, Marianne C. — 355 
McCready, Rogert L. — 355 
McCullough, Helen M. — 355 
McDermott, Paul G. — 355 
McDonald. Kelly A. — 355 
McDonald, Nancy C. — 355 
McDonnell, Raymond P. — 

355 
McDonough, Ann L. — 355 
McDonough, Margaret — 356 
McEvoy, Melanie — 356 
McGarry, Christine A. — 356 
McGeehan, Patrick — 356 
McGillvray, Mildred M. — 

356 
McGinness, Robin M. — 356 
McGinty, Mary E. — 356 
McGovern, Fr. Leo, S.J. — 

255 
McGrail, Alice — 356 
McGrath, Brian J. — 356 
McGrath, Karen M. — 356 
McGuire, Michael T. — 356 
McGuire, Regina A. — 357 
McGuire, Robert J. — 357 
McHale, Kim A. — 357 
Mclnnis, Susan J. — 357 
Mclntyre, Mary E. — 357 
Mclsaac, Andrew J. — 357 
McKeena, Deidre Ann — 357 



Index 429 



McKeever, Amy S. — 357 
McKeena, James H. — 357 
McKinney, Robert E. — 357 
McKinnon, Brian J. — 357 
McKitchen, Liane M. — 357 
McLafferty, Robert B. — 357 
McLaughlin, Joseph D. — 357 
McLaughlin, Maura L. — 357 
McLaughlin, Michael E. — 

357 
McLaughlin, Peter J. — 357 
McLean, James A. — 357 
McLean, Lisa C. — 357 
McMahon, Julie E. — 357 
McMahon, R.J.,Jr. — 358 
McManama, Deborah E. — 

358 
McNally, Grace E. — 358 
McNamara, John B. — 358 
McNamara, Maura M. — 358 
McNeill, John B. — 358 
McQuade, Peter J. — 358 
McQuade, Peter J. — 358 
McQuillen, Michael P. — 358 
McSally, Mary Kaitlin — 358 
McShane, Joanne Marie — 

358 
McVay, Patrick J. — 358 
McQeeney, Jeff M. — 358 
McWeeney, Mary A. — 358 
Measelle, Lara — 358 
Meccia, John W. — 358 
Medeiros, Ana M. — 358 
Medina, Elizabeth J. — 358 
Meghreblian, Susan L. — 358 
Mehri, Susan — 358 
Meisenbacher, Patrick N. — 

359 
Mekemson, Caryn M. — 359 
Mellin, Jonathan B. — 359 
Melon, Steve — 359 
Mendel, Kevin J. — 359 
Mendel Club — 74 
Mercado, Teresita, M. — 359 
Mercuro, Thomas — 359 
Meriam, Anne F — 359 
Merlesena, John G. — 359 
Merren, Helen — 359 
Messer, Mary C. — 360 
Messier, Erin P. — 360 
Messina, Andrea M. — 360 
Meyers, James R. — 360 
Meyers, Karen C. — 360 
Mezzanotte, Joseph J. — 361 
Micozzi, Angela — 361 
Mieszkalski, Glenn B. — 361 
Mihalik, John — 361 
Mihelic, Mary B. — 361 
Miller, E. Miller — 361 
Miller, Edward G. — 361 
Miller, Jennifer — 361 
Millerick, Colleen M. — 361 
Mills, Alice D. — 361 
Milton, Maureen — 361 
Mirra, Leonard — 361 
Misail, Hope V. — 361 



Mitala, Helen — 361 
Mitchell, Frank S. — 361 
Mitchell, Timothy A. — 361 
Mod Life — 205 
Mok, Robert— 361 
Molinary, Charles T. — 361 
Monaghan-Dee, Elizabeth — 

361 
Monahan, David J. — 361 
Monahan, Michael F. — 362 
Monan, Fr. Doanld, S.J. 
Mondell, Denise S. — 362 
Monette, Pierre F. — 362 
Montana, Catherine M. — 362 
Montani, Christopher J. — 

362 
Montrone, Michele M. — 362 
Mooney, Mary M. — 362 
Mooney, William S. — 362 
Moore, Paula — 362 
Moore, Randall A. — 362 
Morals, Manuel V. — 362 
Mordarski, Christopher P. — 

362 
Moreschi, Patricia A. — 362 
Morett, Charlene — 108 
Morgan, Jeffrey M. — 362 
Moriarty, Diane M. — 362 
Moriarty, Kenneth John — 

362 
Moriarty, Paul F. — 362 
Moroney, Kerry A. — 362 
Morrill, Brian R. — 362 
Morris, Ellen — 362 
Morris, James P. — 363 
Morris, Maria L. — 363 
Morrissey, Carolyn — 363 
Morrissey, Leo J. — 363 
Morrissey, William P. — 363 
Morsellino, John P. — 363 
Morton, Catherine E. — 363 
Moscaritolo, Christine A. — 

363 
Moskowitz, Anita L. — 363 
Motta, Luis Carlos — 363 
Mottershead, Yvonne A. — 

363 
Mottola, Joseph M. — 363 
Moyer, Kristin M. — 363 
Mozek, George J. — 363 
Mudd, Matthew Moring — 

364 
Mueller, Dawn L. — 364 
Mueller, Gregory T. — 364 
Mula, David P. — 364 
Mulcahy, Kelly A. — 364 
Mulcahy, Matthew R. — 364 
Muldoon, Maray E. — 364 
Muldoon, Mary E. — 364 
Mullane, Marie D. — 364 
Mullarkey, Margaret B. — 

364 
Mullen, Richard J. — 364 
Mullen, Steven J. — 364 
Mullins, Tara J. — 365 
Mulroney, Christine L. — 365 



Mulvaney, Robert J. — 365 
Mulvey, Kathleen J. — 365 
Munro, Susan M. — 365 
Munroe, Robert L. — 365 
Munsell, Sheilah M. — 365 
Murphy, Alice M. — 365 
Murphy, Anne Marie — 365 
Murphy, Brian A. — 365 
Murphy, Brian J. — 365 
Murphy, Christopher J — 365 
Murphy, Henry L. — 365 
Murphy, Margaret O. — 365 
Murphy, Maureen Anne — 

365 
Murphy, Maureen E. — 365 
Murphy, Maureen T. — 365 
Murphy, Michael J. — 366 
Murphy, Michaela M. — 366 
Murphy, Michele A. — 366 
Murphy, Donald, Jr. — 365 
Murphy, Michael J. — 365 
Murray House — 49 
Musical Guild — 56 




Naas, Gayle S. — 366 
Naddaff, Elizabeth G. — 366 
Nagle, Paul W. — 366 
Nairne, Christopher K. — 366 
Nappa, Lisa A. — 366 
Nash, Kevin J. — 366 
Nash, Timothy J. — 366 
Nazaretian, Lisa A. — 366 
Neave, Tracey A. — 366 
Nedelkoff, Rebecca R. — 366 
Needelman, William B. — 366 
Needle, Lawrence — 366 
Neenan, Fr. William, S.J. — 

217, 250 
Nelson, Lynda A. — 366 
Neuhauser, John J. — 251 
Newman, Carol B. — 366 
Newsham, David W. — 366 
Nguyen, Thieu — 366 
Nickeson, Richard E. — 367 
Nicosia, Anne Marie — 367 
Niewinski, Michael B. — 367 
Nikitin, Patricia A. — 367 
Nobili, Giulia — 367 
Noble, Charles H. — 367 
Noble, Paul H. — 367 
Nolan, Joanne C. — 367 
Noland, Jaime M. — 367 
Noonan, Brendan — 367 



Noone, Michael B. — 367 
Norbert, Stephen J. — 367 
North, Susan — 368 
Norton, Kimberly A. — 368 
Norton, Paul F. — 368 
Nothelfer, Suzanne — 368 
Nunan, Kathleen A. — 368 
Nunez, Luis — 368 
Nunno, Goerge J. — 368 
Nyklewicz, Michael J. — 368 




O'Berdiek, Heidi — 369 
O'Brien, Angela C. — 369 
O'Brien, Anne M. — 369 
O'Brien, Anthony F. — 369 
O'Brien, Catherine M. — 369 
O'Brien, Mary Patricia — 369 
O'Brien, Nora E. — 369 
O'Brien, Patricia A. — 369 
O'Brien, Sean C. — 369 
O'Brien, Colleen P. — 369 
O'Connell, Amy L. — 369 
O'Connell, Julie A. — 369 
O'Connell, Mark — 369 
O'Connell, Nancy — 369 
O'Connell, Virginia — 369 
O'Connell, William F — 369 
O'Connell House — 50 
O'Connor, David — 369 
O'Connor, Jeannine M. — 

369 
O'Connor, Kevin J. — 369 
O'Connor, Paige A. — 370 
O'Connor, Kathleen — 369 
O'Donnell, Matthew J. — 370 
O'Duffy, Brendan P. — 370 
O'Hearn, Meghan — 370 
O'Keefe, Karen E. — 370 
O'Koniewski, Scott P. — 370 
O'Leary, Robert J. — 370 
O'Leary, Suzanne M. — 370 
O'Malley, Tom — 147 
O'Neil, Tara D. — 370 
O'Neill, Brigid B. — 370 
O'Neill, Edward P. — 370 
O'Neill, John C. — 370 
O'Neill Library — 230, 231, 

272 
O'Reilly, Liam — 370 
O'Reilly, Patricia M. — 370 
O'Reilly, Tricia M. — 370 
O'Shea, Mary T. — 371 



430 Index 



O'loole, Jean — :57l 
Observer — 57 
Off-Campus Ijfc — 194, \9r> 
Ogden, Deborah A. — :^7() 
OISA — 47 

Olaiuler. I.ars W. — 370 
Olmslead, Dai lene A. — 370 
Olsen, Shelley L. — 370 
Omicroii Delia Kpsilon — 39 
Oiulerdoi.k, Paul I,. — 370 
Orrjohn R. — 371 
OSPAR — 75 
Ottaviani, Pliilip R. — 371 
Otto, Thomas B. — 371 




Padden, Michael J. — 371 
Page, Katherine B. — 371 
Paladino, Rosemarie — 371 
Palladino, Joan M. — 371 
Rallies, John S. — 371 
Palmer, Katherine J. — 371 
Palmieri, Lisa A. — 371 
Pankey, Laura A. — 371 
Pantano, Dawn M. — 371 
Papagoda, Gretchen, M. — 

372 
Papso, Catherine F. — 372 
Paquette, Monique A. — 372 
ParaProfessional Leader 

Group — 65 
Pardus, Jennifer L. — 372 
Parente, Deborah L. — 372 
Parisi, John Paul — 372 
Parisi, Stephen D. — 372 
Park, SoungJ. — 372 
Parker, Susan G. — 372 
Parking— 197 
Parks, Kathleen M — 372 
Parrella, David J. — 372 
Partridge, David A. — 373 
Pascal, Elaine F. — 373 
Paskowski, John P. — 373 
Passanante, Joseph K. — 373 
Passios, Susan L. — 373 
Passmann, Marc A. — 373 
Patriots, New England — 222 
Patterson, Marybeth — 373 
Paul, Marybeth — 373 
Peach, Stephen — 373 
Pearsall, DiahneJ. — 373 
Pecevich, Anne M. — 166, 

167, 373 



Pe( k, jong-Kwan — 373 
Pcderson, Patricia Ann — 373 
Palaez, Katherine — 373 
Pelidis, Denietri |ohn — 170, 

171,373 
I*el()C|uin, Dr. C. Alexander — 

210 
Pembroke, Joan M. — 373 
Pena, Antonella — 373 
Pena, Steven M. — 373 
IViniachio, Michael A. — 373 
Pepe, Andrea F. — 373 
Peralta, JudyAnn A. — 374 
Pereira, AnneMarie — 374 
Perez, Eric — 374 
Perillo, Alfonso A. — 374 
Perrotta, Brigitte — 374 
Personnel Management 

Association — 73 
Pesce, Gregory J. — 374 
Petersen — Kirsten L. — 374 
Peterson, Cheryl L. — 374 
Petit, Christian L. — 374 
Petrillo, Maria Rita P. — 374 
Pfeiffer, Kenneth W. — 374 
Phi Alpha Theta — 40 
Phi Beta Kappa — 40 
Phillips, Sandra A. — 374 
Pi Mu Epsilon — 41 
Picot, Mark S. — 374 
Pierce, Diana A. — 374 
Pierce, Louise C. — 374 
Piers, Wayne D. — 374 
Pietrangeli, Lisa A. — 374 
Pike, Barry Michael — 374 
Pina,Joel B. — 374 
Pinstein, Robin P. — 374 
Pisacich, Bran J. — 375 
Plex, The — 240 
Plotzke, Mardo— 125 
Plummer, Priscilla B. — 375 
Pokorny, Christine — 375 
Polerecky, James P. — 375 
Political Science Association — 

72 
Polk, Kim A. — 375 
Ponce, Elizabeth S. — 375 
Pontes, Crisolita H. — 375 
Popolizio, Joseph J. — 375 
Porche, Cecelia A. — 375 
Porter, Mary — 375 
Porzio, Julie M. — 376 
Poston, Craig A. — 376 
Power, Elaine M. — 376 
Powers, Barry F. — 376 
Powers, Karen — 376 
Powers, Sheila M. — 376 
Prado, Ana M. — 376 
Precopio, Dominic — 376 
Prendiville, Patricia A. — 376 
Pro-Life Coalition — 74 
Prosper, Genevieve A. — 377 
Protonotarios, Alexios — 377 
Provost, Ellen M. — 377 
Pugliese, Marc C. — 377 
Pullia, Michele M. — 377 



Pulsiler, Mi( helle A. — 377 
Pushkal, Janei Therese — 377 




Qualtere, Maria — 377 
Quay, Sara E. — 377 
Que, Michael — 377 
Quigley, Mary B. — 377 
Quincy Market — 238 
Quinn, Patricia M. — 377 
Quirk, Peter — 377 




Raffaele, RobertJ. — 377 
Raia, Mary Jo — 377 
Ramirez, Joseph A. — 377 
Ramos, Maria Judith — 377 
Randell, William Mark — 377 
Ranno, Dianne J. — 377 
Raring, Elisabeth S. — 378 
Raskin, Michael L. — 378 
Rat Staff — 50 
Rat, The — 236, 237, 263 
Ravosa, Anthony William — 

378 
Raybuck, Jacqueline A. — 378 
Raza, MarkJ. — 378 
Rearden, Maura E. — 378 
Redgate, Kathleen M. — 378 
Redznak, Susan M. — 378 
Reed, Frank A. — 378 
Reed, Tanji P. — 378 
Regalado, Ernesto D. — 378 
Regan, Noreen M. — 378 
Regatta — 22 1 
Reidy, Thomas J. — 378 
Reilly, Ann Marie — 378 
Reilly, John L. — 378 



Reilly, Kathleen M. — 378 
Reilly, Peter A. — 378 
Reindl, Thomas J. — 378 
Rciih, Katherine A. — 378 
Renehan, Joan F. — 379 
l<(-ngucci, Diane L. — 379 
Renner, Kara E. — 379 
Republican (>lub — 57 
Restivo, Thomas F. — 379 
Reyes, Gabriela — 379 
Reynolds, Margaret M. — 379 
Reziiick, Darrin M. — 379 
Rice, Kathryn A. — 379 
Rice, Pamela F. — 379 
Richard, Colleen — 379 
Richards, Torri A. — 379 
Ri( hardson, Mary Beth — 379 
Rickard, Anne C. — 380 
Rico, George A. — 380 
Ridgway, Lisa A. — 380 
Riehl, Patricia A. — 380 
Riga, Joseph F. — 380 
Rigdon, Joan E. — 380 
Riley, Maureen K. — 380 
Rinehart, Anne L. — 380 
Ring, Mary E. — 380 
Rionda, Gloria M. — 380 
Ripley, Sandra R. — 380 
Ritchie, Lionel — 245 
Ritzinger, Lisa A. — 381 
Rivera, NinaC. — 381 
Rizy, Leonard L. — 381 
Rizziere, Laura A. — 381 
Rizzo, Maria Antonetta — 381 
Rizzo, Raymond F. — 381 
Roach, Rita E. — 381 
Roaches — 214 
Road Trips — 234, 235 
Roberts, Casey L. — 381 
Roberts, John F. — 381 
Roberts Center — 125 
Robertson, Daniel J. — 381 
Robins, Jennifer A. — 381 
Robinson, Maureen G. — 381 
Robinson, Scott — 381 
Robles, Mario A. — 381 
Robsham Theatre — 213 
Rocanelli, Andrea L. — 381 
Roche, Patricia M. — 381 
Roche, Philip P. — 381 
Rodriguez, Giselle M. — 381 
Rogers, John J., Ill — 381 
Rogers, Michele K. — 381 
Rogers, Monique — 382 
Roldan, Luis F. — 382 
Roman, Annemarie R. — 382 
Romanek, Donna M. — 382 
Romaniw, Janine Marie — 

382 
Romano, James P. — 382 
Romano, Robin L. — 382 
Romero, James M., Jr. — 382 
Romo, Erika J. — 382 
Romualdez, Rafael C. — 382 
Ronan, Mark Paul — 382 
Rosa, Stephen M. — 382 

Index 43 1 



Rouvapes, Jane — 382 
Rowe, Kevin P. — 382 
Roy, Rhonda A. — 382 
Rugby, Men's — 62, 105 
Rubgy, Women's — 62 
Rumrill, Cindy M. — 382 
Russ, Michael A. — 382 
Russell, Caroline A. — 382 
Russell, Thomas — 382 
Russo, Salvatore A. — 382 
Ryan, Andrews Thomas — 

383 
Ryan, Colleen A. — 383 
Ryan, David M. — 383 
Ryan, Irene H. — 383 
Ryan, Michael A. — 383 
Ryan, Richard J. — 383 
Ryan, Robert H. — 383 
Ryan, Siobhan — 383 
Ryan, Tara-Ann — 383 
Ryan, Maureen — 383 
Ryder, James L. — 383 
Rzewnicki, Andree — 383 




Saia, Paul M. — 383 
Sailing — 94, 95 
Salmen, Tania — 383 
Salmon, Thomas M. — 384 
Salmonson, Wendy J. — 384 
Salvatore, Matthew P. — 384 
Sampson, Carol — 384 
Samuelsen, Lisa — 384 
Sanchez, Olga E. — 384 
Sanchez, Viviana — 384 
Santagata, Michael W. — 384 
Santamaria, Susan J. — 384 
Santiago, Linda C. — 384 
Santiso, Ana M. — 385 
Santos, Michael D. — 385 
Sarnacchiaro, Antoinette N. 

— 385 
Sarram, Peter — 385 
Sasek, Jerilyn M. — 385 
Sauls, Carlton R. — 178, 179, 

385 
Savoca, Karen A. — 385 
Scanion, Mary S. — 385 
Scanneil, Laura A. — 385 
Scardaville, Rosemary F. — 

385 
Schali, Amy Elizabeth — 385 
Schauder, Frederick F. — 385 



Schaus, Deirdre O. — 385 
Scheffert, Christine — 385 
Schiavoni, Andrea J. — 385 
Schur, Stuart J. — 385 
Schwegman, John E. — 385 
Schwenker, Wendy L. — 385 
Scobie, Paul J. — 385 
Scordino, Joseph S. — 385 
Scoreboard — 150, 151 
Seaward, Gerald — 386 
Seely, Keith D. — 386 
Sefchick, Chrisann — 386 
Seigenthaler, Amy — 262 
Seman, Mark D. — 386 
Semino, Semira — 386 
Sen, Brian L. — 386 
Serrano, Kimberlee — 386 
Sessa, Roberta A. — 386 
Shannon, Laura L. — 386 
Shanus, Stuart A. — 386 
Shapiro, Milton L. — 386 
Shea, Colleen M. — 386 
Shea, John M. — 386 
Shea, NeilJ. — 386 
Sheehan, Deirdre M. — 386 
Sheehan, Mary J. — 386 
Sheehy, James L. — 386 
Sheppard, Valerie K. — 386 
Sheptock, Patricia A. — 386 
Sheridan, Richard C. — 386 
Sheridan, Suzanne M. — 387 
Shilale, Gayle A. — 387 
Shimkus, Susan D. — 387 
Shin, Karen G. — 387 
Shopping — 218 
Short, Audrey B. — 387 
Short, Kelly M. — 387 
Sibley, Jennifer D. — 387 
Sica, Richard M. — 387 
Sicbaldi, Carol A. — 387 
Sicotte, David R. — 387 
Siegel, Marc E. — 387 
Siegmann, Trudi M. — 387 
Sieh, Victoria — 388 
Sigma Theta Tau — 4 1 
Silk, Michael T. — 388 
Silva, Carlos A. — 388 
Silvestri, Vincent A. — 388 
Simard, Kathleen M. — 388 
Simoneau, Donald A. — 388 
Singer, Howard — 91 
SInicki, Michael S. — 388 
Sipple, Mary K. — 388 
Sirignano, Barbara C. — 388 
Sisk, Cathleen E. — 388 
Ski Team— 127, 128 
Skoczenski, Ann M. — 388 
Skorczewski, Dawn M. — 389 
Slavic and Eastern Circle — 

48 
Slayton, Jill — 389 
Small, Beth A. — 389 
Small, Susan M. — 389 
Smillie, Martha M. — 389 
Smith, Andrew G. — 389 
Smith, Bradford C. — 389 



Smith, Carolyn A. — 389 
Smith, Christine M. — 389 
Smith, Christopher R. — 389 
Smith, Glen P. — 389 
Smith, Kristin — 389 
Smith, Marilyn A. — 389 
Smith, Pamela J. — 389 
Smith, David W. — 182, 183, 

389 
Smith, Kenneth J. — 389 
Smiy, Donna M. — 389 
Snow, Karen M. — 389 
Soccer, Men's— 102, 103 
Soccer, Women's — 100, 101 
Social Scene — 206, 209 
SOE — 264, 268 
SOE Senate — 44 
Sohn, Joori — 389 
Solda, Marianne — 389 
Solomon, Stephen M. — 390 
Solviletti, Steven A. — 390 
SOM — 260, 268 
SOM Honors — 73, 260 
SOM Senate — 42, 260 
Sommerlad, Patricia — 390 
SON — 263, 268 
SON Senate — 42 
Sorrento, Karen E. — 390 
Sparring Club — 61 
Speckhart, Patricia M. — 390 
Spellman, Mart. T. — 390 
Spending — 202 
Spera, Susan E. — 390 
Spirit — 52, 230 
Sprano, Jeanne A. — 390 
Spurgas, Edwin R. — 390 
Squash Club — 63 
Squasoni, Douglas W. — 390 
St. George, Patricia A. — 390 
St. Ignatius — 217 
Stadulis, Lawrence P. — 390 
Stahlie, Michelle — 390 
Stalzer, Ernest D. — 390 
Stanton, Mary E. — 390 
Stanton, Richard P. — 390 
Stapp, Cynthia D. — 390 
Steinbrink, Leigh A. — 390 
Steinkamp, Diane E. — 390 
Steinkrauss, Kristin E. — 390 
Steinmann, Peter M. — 391 
Stenberg, Paul H. — 391 
Stepanek, Timothy J. — 391 
Stephanos, Ann Marie — 391 
Stephen, Craig M. — 391 
Stevens, Brian M. — 391 
Stevens, Thomas P. — 391 
Stickle, Deborah S. — 391 
Stiglmeier, Carol R. — 391 
Stoltenhoff, Laureen — 391 
Stradford, Troy E. — 391 
Strahorn, Kathleen E. — 391 
Straker, Volma T. — 391 
Stojny, Michael D. — 39 1 
Strueber, Francis S. — 392 
Strysky, Alexander J. — 392 
Student Admissions Program 



— 64 
Student Transfer Center — 

64 
Stutzman, Micheal J. — 392 
Stylus — 58 

Sub-Turri — 19, 59, 444-448 
Sullivan, Catherine R. — 392. 
Sullivan, David N. — 392 
Sullivan, James F. — 392 
Sullivan, John L. — 392 
Sullivan, Kevin P. — 393 
Sullivan, Laura K. — 393 
Sullivan, Mark V. — 393 
Sullivan, Martha P. — 393 
Sullivan, Paul L. — 393 
Sullivan, Susan T. — 393 
Sumberg, Martha C. — 393 
Surman, Julie A. — 393 
Suski, Diane M. — 393 
Sweeney, Robert E. — 393 
Swimming, Men's — 135 
Swimming, Women's — 136, 

137 
Sylvia, Marueen M. — 393 
Sylvia, Lisa M. — 393 
Szabo, Victoria — 393 
Szekely, Julie A. — 393 
Szoka, Patricia A. — 393 
Szostak, Christine A. — 393 
Szustak, Michel K. — 393 
Szymanski, Robert J. — 393 




T, The — 218 
Taber, Elizabeth — 393 
Taft, Jamie L. — 393 
Taggart, Margaret J. — 394 
Tagila, James J. — 394 
Tague, Lizanne C. — 394 
Tamney, Tara L. — 394 
Tardanico, Susan M. — 394 
Taylor, Christopher M. — 394 
Taylor, Eileen — 394 
Taylor, Jennifer M. — 394 
Taylor, Justin Nicholas — 394 
Taylor, Matthew A. — 394 
Tennis, Men's — 88, 89 
Tennis, Women's — 90, 91 
Terpening, Wendy A. — 394 
Terpstra, Bryan J. — 394 
Terry, Lisa O. — 394 
Tevnan, Thomas P. — 394 
Thanner, Koren I. — 394 
Thibodeau, Kristen C. — 394 



432 Index 



Thie, Bernadeltc M. — 394 
Thonias. |aines 1). — 394 
Thomas, Fclcr W. — 174, 

175, 394 
Th()m])S()n, Cllirislinc M. — 

394 
Tiangco, Kenneth T. — 395 
Tierney, Paul A. — 395 
Tierno, David A. — 395 
Tillinghast, David G. — 395 
Tobin, Catherine M. — 395 
Tobin, Maurice J. — 395 
Toelke, Richard A. — 395 
Toof, Bill— 128 
Toossi, Fatemeh — 395 
Tosado, Rebekah — 395 
Tota, Susan J. — 395 
Towey, Susan E. — 395 
Tracey, Joshua S. — 396 
Track, Men's— 130, 131 
Track, Women's — 132, 133 
Tragert, Joseph P. — 396 
Traietti, Andrew A. — 396 
Trainor, Dawn P. — 396 
Trainer, Elizabeth P. — 396 
Tran, Thanh N. — 396 
Trapilo, Stephen P. — 396 
Trepp, Steven R. — 396 
Tricca, Suzanne T. — 396 
Trofi,Juliet C. — 396 
Troubalos, Rita A. — 396 
Truini, Lisa M. — 396 
Tsang, May P. — 396 
Tsoucalas, Gerogia — 396 
Tully, Dawn A. — 397 
Tally, Timothy J. — 397 
Tully, Timothy M., Jr. — 397 
Turczynski, Patricia — 397 
Turk, Russell F. — 397 
Turner, Donald J. — 397 
Tyler, Laura A. — 397 
Tyler, Sloan A. — 397 
Tzimopoulos, George E. — 

397 
Tzoufa, Anna — 397 




UGBC — 51, 243 
UGBC Senate — 43 
Ulian, Stephen P. — 397 
Ulrich, Laurette I. — 397 
Urn, Woochong — 397 
Unger, Kara J. — 397 



Urso, Frank A. — 397 
Usilcr, Laura L. — 397 




Vadas, Bradley H. — 397 
VaFiades, Kerri L. — 397 
Vagelatos, Sandra — 397 
Valenti, Theresa M. — 397 
Vallace, Mary S. — 398 
Vananglen, James B. — 398 
Vanasse, Gary K. — 398 
Vanderslice, Peter T. — 398 
Vandervelde, Christiaan D. — 

398 
Vandeven, Maryke E. — 398 
Vanhorn, Richard J. — 398 
Vazquez, Isabel M. — 398 
Vazquez-Capote, Juan Jose — 

398 
Vazza, Richard W. — 398 
Vece, Sallie A. — 398 
Velasco, Kristie — 398 
Ver Eecke, Fr. Robert, S.J. — 

245 
Vetri, Paul T. — 398 
Vieira, Lorene — 398 
Vinci, Trish A. — 398 
Visual Arts — 51 
Vitti, Sherri A. — 398 
Voices of Imani — 57 
Volleyball, Women's — 92, 93 
Voloshin, Cynthia L. — 398 
Von Feldt, Judith A. — 398 
Vonleh, Adelaide — 398 
Voutsaras, Theofanis — 399 




Wade, Cheryl A. — 399 
Wagner, Paul F. — 399 
Wakin, Elizabetyh A. — 399 



Walkina, Kellie A. — 399 
Wall, Maureen P. — 399 
Wallace, Theresa M. — 399 
Wallisch, Tracey A. — 399 
Walsli, Carolyn J. — 399 
Walsh, Donna — .399 
Walsh, Elizabeth M. — 399 
Walsh, James F. — 399 
Walsh, John M. — 400 
Walsh, John M. — 400 
Wal.sh, Jo.seph T. —400 
Walsh, Margaret M. — 400 
Walsh, Mary — 400 
Walsh, Mary — 400 
Walsh, Maura A. — 400 
Walsh, Maureen E. — 400 
Walsh, Steven J. — 400 
Walter, Eric G. — 400 
Walther, Barbara L. — 400 
Walton, Jacquelyn M. — 401 
Ward, Maureen M. — 401 
Warren, Tiffanye E. — 401 
Wasik, Joann M. — 401 
Water Polo, Men's — 63 
Waters, George A. — 401 
Watkins, Mary M. — 401 
Watkins, Sheryl A. — 401 
Watson, Caroline F. — 401 
Watson, Laurie A. — 401 
Weaver, Kathleen — 401 
Weber, Robert J., Jr. — 401 
Weingart, Michael E. — 401 
Weinheimer, Eric P. — 401 
Weis, Louise M. — 401 
Weldon, Christine — 401 
Welsh, Anastasia L. — 401 
Wendel, Petter E. — 401 
Wendelken, Karen E. — 401 
Weselcouch, Elizabeth M. — 

401 
Wheaton, Sarah — 401 
Wheeler, Misty G. — 402 
Whelan, John F. — 402 
White, CarlaJ. — 402 
White Mountain Creamery — 

191 
Wickwire, Joseph — 402 
Wildman, Susan L. — 402 
Wilkins, Lisa W. — 402 
Willette, Lindsay A. — 402 
Williams, Anthony T. — 402 
Williams, Edward W. — 402 
Williams, Kristen M. — 402 
Wilson, Ellen A. — 402 
Wilson, Janet L. — 402 
Wilson, Mark C. — 402 
Wilson, Pamela D. — 402 
Wilson, Robert C. — 402 
Winokur, James H. — 402 
Winsor, Jeffrey J. — 402 
Wisiaiko, Edward S. — 402 
Witherell, Theodore J. — 402 
Witt, Colleen M. — 402 
Wittek, Anja — 403 
Woicik, Christopher C. — 403 
Wolfelsperger, Scott R. — 403 



Wong, Chiu —403 
Wong, Hun S. — 403 
Wong, Laura — 403 
Wong, Mee C. — 403 
Wong, Vidoria ML — 403 
Wood, Midiael P. — 403 
Woodbury, Peter M. — 403 
Worthen, William A. — 403 
Wortniann, Susan M. — 403 
Wrestling— 107 
Wyman, Barry S. — 403 
WZBC — 59 




Yankee, Kristin H. — 403 
Yarbrough, Am M. — 404 
Yates, Julian C. — 404 
Yee, Carolyn S. — 404 
Young, Maria T. — 404 
Young, Paul — 242, 243 
Yu, Changpae J. — 404 




Zafiropoulos, Michael H. — 

404 
Zaremba, Joseph A. — 404 
Zarillo, Anthony J. — 404 
Zawtocki, Jo Ann M. — 404 
Zeldman, Lisa P. — 404 
Zelter, Andrew J. — 404 
Zeppa, Beatrice — 404 
Zeranski, Linda S. — 404 
Zisi, Christopher J. — 404 
Zoromski, Neal W. — 404 
Zouzalik, Elizabeth A. — 404 
Zuercher, Gregory J. — 404 
Zuercher, Gregory J. — 404 
Zurlo, Jeanne M. — 404 

Index 433 




434 Gallery 




GALLERY 



Gallery 435 



^■i^-^^.-m: 




436 Gallery 




Galleij 437 




438 Gallery 




^,^.,.:, .y^,^ ^..;^,o.. -,. -^^--^■.. ^, v>r 



Gallery 439 




I 



440 Gallery 





Bill Russell 




Oeoii wny 



Gallery 441 




442 Gallery 




Geoff Why 



Gallery 443 



ge off why, bill russell, andy ryan-photographers 




Christopher bote Iho- layout 



444 Suh Turri 



mimi rehak, cynthia cady-sporLs 




Joanne palumho-academics 




Carolyn morrissey, judy vogtle, Joanne conte-student life 



Sub Turri 445 




rj mcmahon-friends 



herta blaz-friends 




amy seigenthaler-copy 



446 Sub Turn 







father leo mcgovern, sj-advisor 





The 1986 Sub Turri is the 74th volume of the book, with a press run of 
1800 copies. It was printed in April 1986 by Hunter Pubhshing Company 
of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Pages are printed offset using black ink 
with pages 17-32 on 80 pound lustre and pages 1-16, 33-448 on dull paper 
stock. The cover is maroon Lexotone. Lettering used on the front cover 
and spine is Letraset Westminster Light and gold mylar stamped. The 
design of the eagle is embossed with a gold metal applique and a spot rub. 
The cover was designed by Kerstin Gnazzo. The eagle was designed from a 
photo of the Gasson eagle taken by Dave Monahan. The primary type face 
is Baskerville with the opening done in Avant Extra Light, the Student 
Activities done in American Typewriter and the Senior names in Venture 
Script. All color photographs were made from transparencies. Spot colors 
were applied to the following pages: 1,19,37,77, 153. 185,247,275,277, PMS 
485,2-15, PMS 479, 82,83,86,87,90,91,94,95,102,103, PMS 432,150,151, 
PMS 429,228,229,232,233,236,237,240-245, PMS 500,259,260,263,264, 
267,268,271,272, PMS 281. Portraiture was done by Harold Dodge of 
Yearbook Associates, Millers Falls, MA. Many thanks to Mom. Dad, Kerry 
Missy. Father McGovern; Lee Pellegrini and the Office of Communica- 
tions; Bill Thompson and OSPAR; Reid Oslin; The Heights; Arnie 
Lohmann, Tracy Holtzmann and Hunter Publishing; Harold Dodge, Ed 
Ralicki and Yearbook Associates; 1986 Patrons, Benefactors, Advertisers; 
and the Class of 1986. 

Copyright by the 1986 Sub Turri, the Yearbook of Boston College, 
Kerstin R. Gnazzo, Editor in Chief. 



I 



to 



keith gnazzo-managing editor 



Sub Turri 447 




kerstin r. gnazzo-editor in chief 

After spending a year as editor in cliief ofthe Sub Turn, I find it hard to express in 
words what I am feeling now that the 1986 Suh Turri is finished. Page 448 not only 
represents the end ofthe 1986 Sub Turri, but also the end of a chapter in my life. It's 
tough to write how it feels not having to put in anymore late nights of typing and 
editing copy, the shooting, proce.ssing, and printing of photos, plus the layout and 
design oi tne book. It is also time for me to turn the reigns over to a new editor. But, 
this book wasn't an individual effort. It was a combined effort of nineteen. 

As an editor. I can testify that hard-working and dedicated people are hard to 
find. So, I would like to take this opportunity to thank each person m my own way. 

The first person on my list is my brother, Keith. When things looked grim in my 
life, he was always there to pick me up. He put in sometimes more hours than I dici. 
He's handling tne finances next year, but I hope he'll also share his support and 
friendship to those, like me, who need it. 

One afternoon when I was first learning how to use our Compaq computer, there 
was a girl who was writing a storv. She was extremely polite and dicln't want to 
bother anyone. After talking with her, I had found a new copy editor-Amy Seigen- 
thaler. She is one person I can't thank enough. All ofthe articles she wrote directly 
from her head. I give her .so much credit for not leaving the office until the last bit of 
copy was tvped in. 

I think this next person is someone who has the drive to succeed in whatever he 
does-Dave Monahan. I spent three months trying to get in touch with him to no 
avail. .After our first meeting. I was impressed with hini. He was starting to work on 
his photography and was an incredible writer. I gave him an idea, and he wrote and 
created the entire opening section. He aLso helped me design the cover. 

"Friends" was a section name thought of by Berta Blaz. She thought that it would 
be more appropriate to think ofthe graduating class as friends, not seniors. Berta 
was responsible for helping me keep my sanity. She made me laugh and look me out 
ofthe office. I'll never forget the Army-Navy game (Navy won) and doing the 128 
pages of seniors. Berta dicln't work solo, her counterpart RJ McMahoii helped us 
get things done so we could study for finals. R|, you were a great comic relief Don't 
ever stop smiling. 

The next person who I owe a great deal to is Geoff Why. When I first became 
editor. I asked Geoff if he wantecltobe the photo editor. He said he didn't want it. 
The week before our first deadline, he took over the position of photo editor. 1 
don't know how to thank him for all of the great photos in this book. (Jeollhad Bill 
Russell and Andy Ryan to help him out. 1 don't know how they handled all ol tho.se 
hours in the darliroom. It must have been the breaks on which they drank Molson's 
and ate a Pizza Wheel Special. 

Every deadline. I knew the spon.s section would be done early. Mimi Rehak has 
no interest in sports, but I asked her to do it, since she was so organized. I never 



448 Sill) Turri 



knew how much time she spent in the office, since she was never there hours on end 
during deadlines, but everything was always done. Thanks for being so organized 
in doing the sports section. Her counterpart was Cynthia Cady. When she took the 
job, I told her she would be running errands. I can't thank her enough for all ofthe 
running to Roberts Center, but also, for being so dedicated and always being in the 
office for her office hours. 

Our finances were handled by Tony Cammarota. As an accounting major, he 
knew exactly how to go about keeping our records. He was a big inspiration in try- 
ing to have a unified staff If it wasn't for him, I don't think I would have tried to 
"unify" the 1986 editors. 

The next six people I want to thank are the different section editors. First of all, 
there is Joanne Palumbo. She wrote me quite a bit during the summer of 198.5, so 
that by the time we came back to school, her whole section was decided upon. 
Thanks for all of the phone calls and running around. Laurie Frazierand Georgina 
Arrieta were responsible for the student activities section. They started working on 
their section in September and didn't finish until January. The next three girls were 
responsible for the most important section of the book: Student Life. Joanne Conte, 
Carolyn Morrissey, and Judy Vogtie spent more hours trying to come up with 
different story ideas than they diclwith the actual layout. 1 am proud of their sec- 
don. It is a unique Student Life section, never before done in a Sub Turri. 

I would like to add a special thanks to our advisor. Father McGovern,S.J. \ou 



were there when I needed guidance. 

■ day 
and asked if he could join the staff. I said we needed a layout editor, so he was wil- 



Last, but not least. I 



xled gi 
would 



ike to thank Chris Botelho. He phoned me one day 



ling to give it a try. He has so much determination and enthusiasm that I know he 
will succeed when he takes over my job as editor in chief Chris, I won't leave you 
with a challenge to try and outdo the 1986 Sub Turri. 1 want to leave you with the 
motivation toW different. 

I think the best way for me to entf this is by something Dave Monahan had said to 
me over and over, "Kerstin, don't lose your creativity " Well Dave, I survived a 
rough year, but I still have my creativity. I have the abihtv to get things done lo the 
best of my ability. I just hope thai lor vou, ihe reader, this book means as much to 
you as it cloes to me. I've done my best to make it different and unique. This was one 
of the best years in my life, and I hope this book has captured sonieof your special 
memories of Boston Colege. 




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